Angry Nurse - page 5

I am wondering if this has happened to any of you.... I got "talked to" by my Assistant Nurse Manager (charge nurse) because of an incident with a patient. My patient asked for some water, and I went... Read More

  1. Visit  teamrn profile page
    0
    No, I don't think we need to give complete DETAILS re: why[there are problems], but I think its wrong to completely disavow knowledge of them. We need to find a way to indicate to patients that we are aware of their concerns, and are working to find solutions, w/out making patients feel unsafe and afraid that their care may suffer. Its been my experience that patients are already aware that something is 'amiss', so an indication to the contrary would be deceptive. Finding the necessary balance (telling some vs. telling all) is a juggling act in itself, so that needs to be OUR challenge. The American public is very savvy and intelligent, and does NOT enjoy hearing of a deceit perpetrated on itself. If given the facts and the opportunity, I believe they would be a valuable asset in helping to find a solution to a problem that affects THEM as well as us. Isn't that what we want? The majority don't want to see us coming to work with the negative attitudes that can result from unsafe conditions, poor compensation, mandatory OT, etc. They don't prevent it because they're not AWARE that it exists. I see no need or reason to alienate such a powerful group, and I see that exclusionist attitudes can and will do just that. Aren't we all really on the same 'side'?

    [This message has been edited by teamrn (edited November 19, 2000).]
  2. Visit  goldilocksrn profile page
    1
    I believe we should be as honest as possible with our patients, regardless of what management says. It is our responsibility. Management can lose their perspective under all of the paperwork and meetings they are caught up in. Whether or not they care, I tell them that I am sorry I could not be there for whatever reason I wasn't there. For example, today I had an anxious COPDer that needed to get up to the bathroom (we were 2 cna's short). I was in another room literally holding the hand of a dying pt. because her family had not arrived yet( she died before they could arrive, and the family was distraught) Anyway, the patient was furious. I simply told her, I had a patient pass away, and I felt she should not die alone. She didn't say another word.
    Aurora77 likes this.
  3. Visit  goldilocksrn profile page
    0
    I believe we should be as honest as possible with our patients, regardless of what management says. It is our responsibility. Management can lose their perspective under all of the paperwork and meetings they are caught up in. Whether or not the patients care, I tell them that I am sorry I could not be there for whatever reason I wasn't there. For example, today I had an anxious COPDer that needed to get up to the bathroom (we were 2 cna's short). I was in another room literally holding the hand of a dying pt. because her family had not arrived yet( she died before they could arrive, and the family was distraught) Anyway, the patient was furious. I simply told her, I had a patient pass away, and I felt she should not die alone. She didn't say another word.
    We as nurses are constantly prioritizing the importance of our daily tasks. If one patient's needs are postponed or omitted due to the needs of another, it must be explained to them why they were forgotten in a confidential way. If the patients or family don't understand, they can call on management. Management is supposed to handle the problems that surface like these and deal with them. I think we should start delegating this task away to them and let them handle it. Maybe if they have to deal with angry family and patients, they can give good reason for not having the help we need.
  4. Visit  ccelia profile page
    0
    I think it is simply not worthed to be angry over an unreasonable person. Our energy should be treasured for people who appreciate.
    Nor do I agree with the nurses in this forum who feel a waitress is a lower-ranked person who can be humiliated.
  5. Visit  natalie profile page
    0
    From Denver Post..


    Denver hospital's ER chief pleads for with doctors to pitch in during crisis
    Denver Post

    Major staffing changes and troubled union negotiations at Denver's Exempla St. Joseph Hospital's emergency room have prompted the ER's top physician to issue a plea for cooperation and increased focus on patient care. He's called upon doctors to help overwhelmed nurses make beds, change IVs, give medications and speed up the flow of patients from the waiting room into the ER.
  6. Visit  goldilocksrn profile page
    0
    Originally posted by ccelia:
    I think it is simply not worthed to be angry over an unreasonable person. Our energy should be treasured for people who appreciate.
    Nor do I agree with the nurses in this forum who feel a waitress is a lower-ranked person who can be humiliated.
    Let me first say that I respect any hard working woman. However, I went to college for 5 years to practice nursing, not waitressing. I know that the nurses on this post don't think they are above a waitress, but we get frustrated because we do so much more than fetch water. It seems sometimes that patients and family members think that is our sole purpose, to serve their every need. Let us all be reminded that our job in nursing it to get the patients back to their baseline ADLS prior to admit. (and point out the obvious to MD's).I think what makes us angry is that at this point in the history of nursing, our best isn't enough to satisfy patient and family needs.

  7. Visit  pickledpepperRN profile page
    0
    Maybe you've heard this before but if we deny that we are not provided with the people and equipment we need in order to provide the nursing care that is the ONLY reason for a hospital to exist we are accepting abuse. Does it not remind you of the family that covers up "Daddys drinking" or the victim lying to protect the abuser?
    If we don't speak up about the abuse of nurses (blaming us because we are not able to do the impossible) we should do it for our patients just as a mother may tell the truth to protect her kids.

    PS: Lets line up bedside nurses to tell the truth at MNM events.
    ------------------


    [This message has been edited by spacenurse (edited November 20, 2000).]
  8. Visit  kurtz profile page
    0
    I am really sorry but I disagree with most of the posters here. I think that it is imperative that we tell patients the reason that we are so run off our feet! It is only through these people that any sort of change is going to occur. If we just smile and say that an emergency has occured or something equally as trite these people will never know the sort of conditions we work under! Enough!! Let the people know how understaffed we are! We can't go on strike because we don't want to leave our patients so the only other way is to get these people to complain a lot more. Maybe they would complain less about us and more about understaffing if they knew the truth.
  9. Visit  mustangsheba profile page
    0
    This is such a hard nut to crack. At the moment we are dealing with a specific problem on the floor is not the time to give detailed or negative explanations to patients. Explaining that an emergency arose that required immediate attention is sufficient. When time allows (little joke here), we may return and reassure patients that we would not have left them hanging if circumstances hadn't dictated that we must. Depending upon the patient, I have pointed out after one of these incidents that had they had their own emergency, I would have dropped a bedpan and been right at their side. I validate their feelings and apologize for the inconvenience, but I do not apologize for prioritizing appropriately. I recommend patients contact the hospital administration for any complaints or recommendations they may have and encourage them strongly to follow through, reminding them that they are the consumers and are the ones with the power. This does not mean I don't advocate strongly for my patients while they are in the hospital. I would have been in my supervisors office about the wet bed. I do believe patients need to be reminded that they are paying the bills and need to demand adequate MEDICAL care. Unfortunately, it will be a while before the insurance companies are put in their place. Which is not in control of medical care.
  10. Visit  OC_An Khe profile page
    0
    If the nurses don't expose the lack of appropriate staffing on the hospital units who will? Maybe the hospitals financial officer will?
  11. Visit  teamrn profile page
    0
    I believe that most RNs think that the patients should be told the 'why's, but the grey area is HOW to tell them and HOW MUCH and WHEN. Do you try to stop at the time of the 'emergency' and explain, do you wait and hope that you'll have the opportunity to discuss w/ them at a later time that your priorities shifted(like mustangsheba said), or do you hope that they'll take the time to answer those patient satisfaction surveys,(and then if they do, be honest!)? Lots to think about here, but I agree that the financial officer's NOT going to address this, and if we REALLY want to advocate for our patients, we need to figure a way to get to the meat of the issue.
  12. Visit  Mijourney profile page
    0
    Originally posted by teamrn:
    No, I don't think we need to give complete DETAILS re: why[there are problems], but I think its wrong to completely disavow knowledge of them. We need to find a way to indicate to patients that we are aware of their concerns, and are working to find solutions, w/out making patients feel unsafe and afraid that their care may suffer. Its been my experience that patients are already aware that something is 'amiss', so an indication to the contrary would be deceptive. Finding the necessary balance (telling some vs. telling all) is a juggling act in itself, so that needs to be OUR challenge. The American public is very savvy and intelligent, and does NOT enjoy hearing of a deceit perpetrated on itself. If given the facts and the opportunity, I believe they would be a valuable asset in helping to find a solution to a problem that affects THEM as well as us. Isn't that what we want? The majority don't want to see us coming to work with the negative attitudes that can result from unsafe conditions, poor compensation, mandatory OT, etc. They don't prevent it because they're not AWARE that it exists. I see no need or reason to alienate such a powerful group, and I see that exclusionist attitudes can and will do just that. Aren't we all really on the same 'side'?

    [This message has been edited by teamrn (edited November 19, 2000).]
    Hi teamrn. I like your thoughts. What do you think about the concept of filling out and making copies of incident reports and submitting them to risk management? I think that staff shortages coupled with patient complaints is a risk management problem. I wonder what the pros and cons would be? Two cons do come to mind: 1-If incident reports have to go through someone in administration,(which they would) would the forms reach risk management? 2-Would the nurse feel confident enough about his/her care to fill out one when faced with patient complaints/demands and excessive nurse-patient ratios? The first question would easily be solved if nurses have access to a computer database with direct email access to risk management. The second I don't know. I agree problems with patient demands/needs and nurse access/availability need air time.
    What do you think about using incident reports in this area? Anyone else? Bad idea?

    Another nurse posted perhaps under another topic that he/she used the facility mission, values, and goals to hold the hospital accountable for providing adequate staff for patient care.
  13. Visit  Doey profile page
    0
    I had a situation not too long ago where we had 9 pts. in ICU, five which were vented with myself and two other RNs one of which was just recently off orientation and new secretary/CMO. In PCU 11 pts. with two RNs one of which was an agency nurse, and CCU with 6 pts. and two RNs, no secretray/CMO. Because of this no one from these units was able to help out like they normally would. Needless to say it was one of the worst nights of my life. The supe., who would have normally piched in to help was stuck up on the floors almost the whole night trying to fix things (med errors, orders not noted etc, etc...) from the last shift which had been staffed with new nurses. None of our pts. was able to complain, but I did for them. The next day when I was calmer, I wrote a letter to risk management with copies to the nurse manager and VP of nursing. (I hand delivered that one). That entire w/e there must have been at least 6 letters/incident reports made out to risk management. The VP also spoke with me for 2hrs. at the time I gave her my letter. (signed by all who worked that night). I told her about the whole night and she was understanding and we went over each problem I addressed in the letter. She then asked me for my input on things including recruitment/retention etc. I did learn that her hands are tied too as to what she is able to do. She said that she would bring some of my suggestions to the executive committee. (always a committee of some kind). Anyway, it didn't happen right away, and maybe it had little to do with our meeting, but we got a raise in Oct. with another one scheduled for Feb. and a critical care and med-surg educator obtained through a grant that the VP of nursing and HR worked on. She had also told me that if this type of situation were to happen again that we could call her/nurse manager in to help out. We also have specific pt. complaint forms that we fill out when pt./family member has an issue/complaint that we give to our nurse manager and she follows through with it. I have to say that up to this point she has followed through on them. So for me thus far, incident reports and pt. complaint forms have helped. (after this we also started seeing more agency nurses to fill the holes)

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