Angry Nurse - page 5

by goldilocksrn 14,605 Views | 141 Comments

I am wondering if this has happened to any of you.... I got "talked to" by my Assistant Nurse Manager (charge nurse) because of an incident with a patient. My patient asked for some water, and I went to get it, but on the way to... Read More


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    Hi. Jerry Falletta made clearer what I pointed out in my first post regarding the legal repercussions from discussing certain types of information. I wonder. Don't hospitals have some type of bill of rights for patients?
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    Originally posted by nrsjo:
    We have a rule that you are to never tell "customers" that you are short staffed. However, when they see you working double after double, they figure it out for themselves.

    As for complaints, well, people these days will complain if you put the ice cubes in their glass wrong. They have no clue or concept of what nurses do all day. As long as we continue to treat patient's as "customers" and give them the sense they are staying at a resort, we will always be regarded as nothing more than the hired help as opposed to the professionals we are.

    HEAR,HEAR!!! My VERY STRONG sentiments exactly!!!! Since when did a hospital become the Holiday Inn? (Or the Marriott?)
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    We are viewed this way because it is the only way we have been portrayed on tv. You never see a nurse on those real-life ER shows. You see "nurse-ratchets" in movies like "one flew over the cookoos nest" and many sitcoms. They need to see what we REALLY do. I don't know if it would make a difference, but it would give them a different perspective. The truth is though, hospitals would never allow cameras to follow nurses, because the public would be APPAULED at what they saw. I know I am..
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    As an Assistant Unit Manager myself I would encourage you not to project an incompetent image onto the unit. It is enough to say a priority situation came up. I would not apologize if I were you! Apologizing implies you did something you are sorry for. I would not be sorry I responded to a situation appropriately; I would be proud! Furthermore you are a Nurse NOT a Waitress!

    Speaking directly to the short staffing issue: as an Assistant Unit Manager I would ask you to come talk to me directly as opposed to just WRITING ME UP for not providing adequate staff. You see when that happens... I GET THE TALKING TO ;-)
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    Originally posted by dwajr:
    As an Assistant Unit Manager myself I would encourage you not to project an incompetent image onto the unit. It is enough to say a priority situation came up. I would not apologize if I were you! Apologizing implies you did something you are sorry for. I would not be sorry I responded to a situation appropriately; I would be proud! Furthermore you are a Nurse NOT a Waitress!

    Speaking directly to the short staffing issue: as an Assistant Unit Manager I would ask you to come talk to me directly as opposed to just WRITING ME UP for not providing adequate staff. You see when that happens... I GET THE TALKING TO ;-)
    AS WELL YOU SHOULD. In most states as the representative of the hospital you assume part of the legal liability for inadequate staffing. You can be held responsible if litigation results in a claim against the hospital. All nurses need to assure that there is adequate staffing for patient care and nurse safety. You need to defend nurses to senior management, I've rarely found RN's crying wolf about not having enough staff to care for their patients. You were an RN before you were a manager, don't change your professional affiliation and don't defend inadequate staffing to "staff" as your effectiveness as a leader will fall.
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    I think this is a very valid discussion, one that needs to be addressed. I'm a senior yr nursing student. In clinicals I experienced something similar. I was doing my first admission on a post-surg unit. In the next bed a pt was being transferred to ICU, required the rest of the RN's on the floor to just move the woman. Apparently one of my pts needed to go to the bathroom during this time (it took me about a half hour to do a full admission). There was, however, 2 CNA's at the desk who were answering call lights. When I made it in to check on my pt she was very upset because she needed to help getting up to get to the BSC, demanded an apology so she could "forgive me". This woman was 53 yrs old, fully continent, but had to use the call light 3 times to get assistance to the BSC. I apologized, tried to explain briefly that I was doing an admission and that the other RN's were doing a pt transfer of a very critically ill pt, to which she cut me off and said that she didn't care- she needed to go to the bathroom. She also informed me that if this happened in the future that she would urinate in the bed and then inform my teacher of why she had done so. I left that day feeling pretty down because I felt like I had let my pt down, even though in retrospect I don't know what else I could have done at the moment. My instructor told me to get ready- there will be a lot of pts that will not be happy with me. They don't care if the pt in the next room is coding, they want to (fill in the blank) when they want it. It was an eye-opener for me. How would you all have handled this situation? Shannon



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    "The highest reward for man's toil is not what he gets for it, but what he becomes by it."-Johan Ruskin
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    I think this is a very valid discussion, one that needs to be addressed. I'm a senior yr nursing student. In clinicals I experienced something similar. I was doing my first admission on a post-surg unit. In the next bed a pt was being transferred to ICU, required the rest of the RN's on the floor to just move the woman. Apparently one of my pts needed to go to the bathroom during this time (it took me about a half hour to do a full admission). There was, however, 2 CNA's at the desk who were answering call lights. When I made it in to check on my pt she was very upset because she needed to help getting up to get to the BSC, demanded an apology so she could "forgive me". This woman was 53 yrs old, fully continent, but had to use the call light 3 times to get assistance to the BSC. I apologized, tried to explain briefly that I was doing an admission and that the other RN's were doing a pt transfer of a very critically ill pt, to which she cut me off and said that she didn't care- she needed to go to the bathroom. She also informed me that if this happened in the future that she would urinate in the bed and then inform my teacher of why she had done so. I left that day feeling pretty down because I felt like I had let my pt down, even though in retrospect I don't know what else I could have done at the moment. My instructor told me to get ready- there will be a lot of pts that will not be happy with me. They don't care if the pt in the next room is coding, they want to (fill in the blank) when they want it. It was an eye-opener for me. How would you all have handled this situation? Shannon



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    "The highest reward for man's toil is not what he gets for it, but what he becomes by it."-Johan Ruskin
    jbabyblu65 likes this.
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    In all due respect, dwajr, for years nurses have 'taken it on the chin' and done it your way and let management 'handle the complaints'. Patient care has NOT improved because of a 'talking to' that you may get from your manager. I feel that patients have EVERY right to be aware that staffing isses ARE real, and if that means that the nurse whom they may have a relationship with tells them-quite frankly I don't care WHO tells them-they do have a RIGHT to know.
    Why do we in healthcare feel the need to 'hide' behind a shroud of secrecy to pretend that everything in healthcare is allright-when we know in our heart of hearts that its not? Consumers may take time to 'catch on' to what we see every day, but once they know, I believe they will be a formidable force for change, and healthcare professionals from top to bottom will have egg on their faces from a deception that 'everything is all right'. I cease to see patient advocacy here. The damage done from this deception will take YEARS to remedy, and I see that as an unnecessary erosion of trust.

    [This message has been edited by teamrn (edited November 19, 2000).]
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    The stonewalling and secrecy in healthcare has been going on for a long time and I believe it's coming to an end. Everything has been hushed up "to protect the patient" and if things were done right, this wouldn't be necessary. The stories go on and on about short staffing, etc. and it seems as if nothing ever changes. I think it is changing; the public is more aware; the hospitals are having problems with labor disputes and publicity and nurses are finally speaking up.
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    Nuring administrators, managers, and supervisors have a responsibility to ensure the best qualit of nursing care. At one hospital we were told, "The corporate office goes over our staffing records. The unit secretary is counted in nursing hours per patient day now. That change is why we had to cut licensed nursing staff." As important as clerical work is, they do not provide nursing care. Why not count the CEO too!.
    If nursing management continues to go along with this dishonesty it must be the bedside nurses. We MUST be honest. I can say I'm sorry without assuming blame. Once I did not answer a call light while caring for a patient in an emergency. The patient with the call light unanswered wet the bed for want of a bedpan. I WAS sorry. It was NOT my fault.
    The public is told of "near miss" airplane crashes, they need to be told of "near misses in hospitals. Sounds like a new thread.
    I know people who took management jobs and left. These nurses should have told why in an exit interview. Say, "I quit because the greedy administration did not allow me to do the job they hired me for, ASSURING QUALITY NURSING CARE!"

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