A patient wants to know your thoughts on frequent fliers... - pg.2 | allnurses

A patient wants to know your thoughts on frequent fliers... - page 2

First of all, forgive me, as I'm sure this will be a long post. Also, it's my first... so hello. To be clear, as the subject states, I am a patient and not a nurse. But given my history I'm... Read More

  1. Visit  Clusterhead profile page
    0
    This is a test post... was trying to upload an image of my eye during an attack for anyone who was interested and was having issues, so really just seeing if this goes through.

    EDIT: Okay, the post went through, but can someone help out here? I intended to upload an image of what my eye usually looks like at the onset of an attack that I had taken a few weeks ago for my doctor. I just figured if anyone were interested in seeing it (as images of such are not common online) then I'd be happy to share. I tried uploading it directly from my computer but it says I do not have permission to do such. Is this because of my small number of posts or....?

    Thanks!
  2. Visit  CaitlynRNBSN profile page
    2
    I think you need to stop worrying about what others think about you. All that matters is you seem like you are getting the treatment you need. Do we have drug seekers?? Of course, but i think nurses and doctors are pretty good about sniffing them from miles away. For every 100 patients we get for chronic pain issues, i'd say only a few are true drug seekers. Alot of them i believe abuse the system. For example, if a patient tells me their pain is a 10/10 and they are resting comfortably, watching TV, talkin on the phone or surfing the web that is abuse of the system. Yes, that person probably does have pain but is it REALLY a 10/10?? Now..if i have a patient who has physial signs of pain, i.e. Moaning, gaurding, rubbing, screaming, crying then i will believe it is a 10/10 and treat it as such. If they felt you were seeking drugs they would take further action and talk to your neurologist or PCP. We have ways of handeling drug seekers, and it doesn't sound like they are doing that to you.
    Just stop worrying about what nurses/doctors think about you. It doesn't matter, you know you have pain. If anyone tries to minimize it or not give you the necessary treatment then report them.
    Last edit by CaitlynRNBSN on May 18, '13
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  3. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    1
    Quote from Clusterhead
    This is a test post... was trying to upload an image of my eye during an attack for anyone who was interested and was having issues, so really just seeing if this goes through.

    EDIT: Okay, the post went through, but can someone help out here? I intended to upload an image of what my eye usually looks like at the onset of an attack that I had taken a few weeks ago for my doctor. I just figured if anyone were interested in seeing it (as images of such are not common online) then I'd be happy to share. I tried uploading it directly from my computer but it says I do not have permission to do such. Is this because of my small number of posts or....?

    Thanks!
    Thank you for offering the picture....however, We cannot offer legal advice....and I think you misunderstand what we are saying...we are not doubting your illness, nor the validity of your complaints.

    Unfortunately.....we deal with the general public and just like a beaten dog we will growl and flinch at a raised fist. Unfortunately.....the few legitimate patients will pay for the majority seekers we see. I have a chronic condition and I will suffer in pain before going to the ED because I think I how they think. I would rather suffer than bother the ED.

    We are only trying to answer your question to maybe give you a little insight that it isn't personal....there have also been regulation changes with the government breathing down everyone's back about excessive usage and prescribing of narcotics....it is CRAZY and this will only get worse with OBAMA care.....especially with the IRS overseeing it. REPORT THEM!

    There may be easier ways to get drugs....but some seekers have a secondary gain for telling everyone how horrible their pain was that they had to go to the ED.

    Here is the point...you have poorly controlled pain. As a chronic illness sufferer of a rare disease...I know your pain .....I am all too aware of "The look" those rolled eyes and audible sigh with that insulting.....we will do our best or when handed Tylenol for pain when your B/P is 180/100 .....or whatever the case is when you suffer from an unusual disease that no one knows that took almost 10 years to get diagnosed with and have many challenges because of it.....I get it, I really do.

    If you were treated poorly then report the facility or offenders to the administration. Kill them with the patient survey. Knock on more MD doors to get you some relief and I agree with Caitlyn.....STOP worrying about what they think.

    President Bush said recently to Matt Lauer.......Don't let the loud voices get you!

    I wish you the best.
    psu_213 likes this.
  4. Visit  dudette10 profile page
    2
    Quote from CaitlynRNBSN
    For example, if a patient tells me their pain is a 10/10 and they are resting comfortably, watching TV, talkin on the phone or surfing the web that is abuse of the system. Yes, that person probably does have pain but is it REALLY a 10/10?? Now..if i have a patient who has physial signs of pain, i.e. Moaning, gaurding, rubbing, screaming, crying then i will believe it is a 10/10 and treat it as such.
    Here's the thing. Chronic migraine sufferers hardly ever look like the second description. They mostly look like the first description, even the teens. They are experts at using distraction to deal with their pain. The OPs outward management of his pain is really an anomaly among migraine pts. Migraine specialists avoid narcotics to treat anyway. They use DHE, beta blockers, anti seizure meds, and teach a wide array of nutritional and behavior and environmental mgmt techniques to help pts.

    OP, I sent you a PM.
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  5. Visit  Clusterhead profile page
    0
    Esme, you'll have to forgive me... I have no idea what you're talking about with "offering legal advice"??? I wasn't asking for any... not trying to be combative, I just really don't have the slightest idea which post or part of my post you're referring to.

    dudette, I will respond later on tonight, thank you for sending it!
  6. Visit  ixchel profile page
    0
    Love, allow me to share with you a perspective of a nursing student who is a chronic pain sufferer. I fell late last year, and discovered as a result that I have fractures in my spine that appear on my x-rays to be very old fractures. I can remember having pain all the way back to 8 years of age, so they are labeling it congenital. My fall pushed my spine forward just enough that I am in chronic daily pain that requires varying degrees of medication.

    Because I am in nursing school, I have to choose wisely when I make any changes to my meds. If I have an increase in pain nowhere near a long weekend, break, or semester's end, I just have to deal with it. I can't let the change in medications kill my grades or this work will have been for nothing. I have to have special consideration to continue in clinical experiences. I had to fight my tail off to keep my seat and gain the blessing of my neurosurgeon. I may be approached this summer for further evidence that I will be cleared for duty this fall. I am afraid. I have had a horrible several weeks that have resulted in tear-filled phone calls to my neurosurgery office's NP to figure out how I can manage to keep this under control. The real kicker is it appears I have issues in my neck, too. My initial diagnosis was in my low back, but now I'm having issues with my neck that are radiating into my shoulders and arms. My NP chooses to treat neuropathy with neurontin. That stuff makes me so stupid. I will be in the middle of a sentence and lose the ability to recall works I want to use. I understand this is a somewhat normal experience on that medication. So do I push through the pain? Or do I treat it with a medication that does affect my ability to function?

    Even when I am not at school, my life is centered around deciding whether I would rather deal with side effects or pain that day. Imagine that on a school or clinical day, when there isn't actually time to deal with either one. I just have to keep going. I have many days when I do genuinely feel I am suffering from a chronic condition. Had I received this diagnosis before beginning the program, I would have gone into health education instead. Nursing is so, so hard. It doesn't help when you go into it with a handicap. But..... as has already been mentioned in this thread, I have a unique perspective into the experience of a chronic pain sufferer that others may not understand the same way. Even the most compassionate nurse on the planet, no matter how much he wants to say he understands, he simply wont be able to appreciate this experience in the same way. I do feel like this will ultimately impact my ability to be a better nurse. Is been there, done that experience really worth it though? My answer to that changes daily. Heck, sometimes it changes hourly.

    Anyway, I hope this perspective can help you with deciding about nursing school or some other path. I am so sorry to be such a debbie downer but I do believe a little reality is good when going in with open eyes. If you do decide nursing school is your path, know that others do get through successfully, and I can also tell you that the taste of success is even sweeter when you have to fight so much harder to achieve it. Good luck to you, and I hope your new doc can help you get a successful regimen with bearable side effects. It is such a shame to be so young and to carry such a burden. You are welcome to PM me any time if you'd like support.
  7. Visit  OCNRN63 profile page
    0
    I've had debilitating migraines that started when I was in grade school. I can completely understand dealing with the kind of pain you describe, but when you seem to be the slightest security threat to staff (e.g. agitation, irritability), that's a problem. As miserable as I felt with my migraines, and there were times I thought I was having a stroke they were so bad, I knew I had to maintain my composure. It wasn't going to help my case to get difficult with the staff, no matter how miserable I felt.

    You need to get your headaches under control before you plan on going to nursing school. You can't be going to the ED with that frequency; it's going to interfere with your classroom and clinical. In addition, you'll need to get on a stable medication regimen. That way you won't be in the ED so frequently, and your quality of life will be much better.
  8. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    Quote from Clusterhead
    Esme, you'll have to forgive me... I have no idea what you're talking about with "offering legal advice"??? I wasn't asking for any... not trying to be combative, I just really don't have the slightest idea which post or part of my post you're referring to.

    dudette, I will respond later on tonight, thank you for sending it!
    I drifted for a moment....medical advice....medical..... I was only trying to commiserate with you that we feel your frustration and empathize with your predicament....and to ignore the mean people..I guess I shouldn't multitask so much...sorry if I confused you....it was perfectly clear this afternoon....
  9. Visit  monkeybug profile page
    0
    Sent you a PM. Best wishes to you, it's certainly no kind of life you'd wish on anyone else.
  10. Visit  Clusterhead profile page
    1
    Another general thanks to the responses!

    Esme, I wasn't asking for medical advice, sorry if that was confusing I just thought it might be helpful for anyone who was interested to see, especially those who work either on the floor in neuro or in the ED. As I've already said, it's not a common disorder and many people who land in the hospital find themselves misdiagnosed... not that an image of my eyes during an attack is going to fix that, I just thought it might be of interest to some. If that's not allowed for any reason then I do apologize. But no, I wasn't asking for any advice, I was just thinking maybe someone would find it of some educational value.

    PS: To those of you who sent me PMs, an extra thanks to you. Hopefully I'll be able to respond soon, but new members can't until they have 15 posts... that's why you haven't heard from me :/
    Last edit by Clusterhead on May 21, '13 : Reason: PS
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  11. Visit  anotherone profile page
    1
    I work on a medical/surgical floor but when I see a frequent flier I don't care unless the pt is someone I dread taking care of. To me this means someone who yells a lot, ( is completely oriented) , rings for silly stuff (move the call bell half an inch) when s/he is a walkie talkie. Yells, " NURSE, HELP ME" when they need a ginger ale etc. Or who do not understand, that while yes s/he is in pain I have OTHER patients who may be even more sick and I have to prioritize care, and pain is not often a priority even if the person is yelling about it. I don't care when pts need narcotics to function even if that means I have to page a doctor. I don't understand why some nurses get so worked up over it. We see a lot of frequent fliers for cystic fibrosis, sickle cell, copd, dka, chrons, all sorts of things. That's part of having a chronic medical condition.
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  12. Visit  anotherone profile page
    0
    The whole " patient doesn't look to be in pain" is so subjective for many patients. Yeah some fake it to get dilaudid but some people are more stoic then others. I always go on my smart phone as a means of distraction or try to focus on the tv.
  13. Visit  nursemike profile page
    0
    My father has dealt with chronic pain for several years. I've tried to coach him how to seek relief without looking like a drug-seeker. I have also discussed with doctors--his (not so much) and on-call for my patients (more often, and sometimes heatedly) that some, maybe most, drug seekers are seeking drugs for relief. (Maybe all, but some for the wrong kind of relief. Drug abusers are self-medicating, but they're using the wrong meds.)
    I work in neuro and have seen cluster headaches. I wish you success in finding treatment. I see you are young, so I hope you may "outgrow" them, as some apparently do. As far as how nurses may perceive you, as others have suggested, it shouldn't matter. We have a job to do, and judging you isn't part of that. But I can imagine if I were in your shoes, I'd have the same concerns. I see a lot more patients with migraines than clusters. What I've seen of clusters--you don't wonder if they are in pain. You wonder how they survive. I do recall a time I was awaiting a transfer from our ED and saw on the Kardex that the patient had migraines and fibromyalgia and thought to myself it was going to be a long night. I don't honestly know whether fibromyalgia is a real condition. It has been debated for awhile and the concensus seems to be leaning toward real, but poorly understood. Anyway, we treat it, and some people seem to get some relief. In the past, and perhaps still outside the hospital, a migraine diagnosis had a similar reputation. A lot of times, though, we have imaging that's pretty definitive and you'd have to be pretty stubborn to think the patient was faking.
    Still, I wasn't wrong about it being a long night, and migraine patients can be awfully frustrating. You can educate until you are blue in the face and they still want Percocet, because Tylenol "doesn't work." The oxycodone in Percocet lowers the threshold for migraines. Narcotics are contraindicated. Percocet "works" because it also contains acetaminophen (Tylenol) which is so good it can work in spite of the oxycodone. And a significant number of our "migraine" admissions are headaches from drug abuse, secondary to actual migraines. That is, they do have migraines, but the present headache has more to do with inappropriate meds. It's a very hard case to argue, and on top of everything else, when you are in a lot of pain, unconsciousness can look pretty darned inviting.
    And don't even get me started on spines. You've been maxing-out Percs for a year-and-a-half before you finally have surgery. If you are lucky you get a day on a PCA, then it's one Lortab every six hours, and you're so resistant from the oxycodone that the Dilaudid in the PCA wasn't getting the job done, and you look at these people with a straight face and tell them it will be better when they go home tomorrow and have other things to do than lie in bed and think about how much it hurts (which is probably true) and that it will be worth it when they heal (which you hope is true).
    Patients in pain are a pain. Most of the time, it isn't their fault. And you do have the occasional ortho or trauma with new-onset acute pain and all you have to do is get their ordered meds on time and they're happy campers. Getting a percocet out of the Pyxis every four hours and handing it to someone is NOT the hard part of pain management. Would that it was. And if all you're looking is to get high, hell, that's easy. I can see you three times in a shift and keep you stoned the whole time. But that's rare.

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