NC Diploma Programs

  1. Hi, I'm thinking of applying to one of the three diploma programs in NC and was wondering if there was anyone who graduated or curremntly in the program (or works in one of the diploma hospitals). I am going to apply to Queens, Mercy, and Durham. I've heard that these programs turn out very good graduates. But thats all I've heard. Tried searching on this board for more information but really couldn't come up with much. Hopefully by applying to all 3 I'll get into one!
    •  
  2. 19 Comments

  3. by   doublej
    I don't know what diploma schools are today but back in the "dark ages", they were fantastic. It was three years- all year- one mo. off each yr. and by the time we were seniors, we were in charge of the floors with supervisors over us. Now that was a long time ago and I am sure that legally this could not be allowed today (that is, being in charge as senior student nurses). The biggest need in nursing (coming from a retiree who had young new nurses working under me) is "on hands" experience and learning to handle volumes of patients. Not easy but it comes at you once you have been graduated and face the real nursing world.
  4. by   elkpark
    The Queens program is not a diploma program; they offer a traditional BSN program and an AD program. The AD program used to be the Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing (of which I am a proud graduate ), but the program converted from a traditional 3-yr. diploma program to an AD program while it was still Presby, and then Presby "gave" the program to Queens and got out of the nursing school biz altogether.

    There is no longer any connection between the Queens AD program and Presbyterian Hospital. The only two remaining diploma programs in NC are Mercy in Charlotte and Watts in Durham.
  5. by   sameasalways
    Hi I guess I am confused. What is a diploma program and how does it differ from the ADN and LPN program? Our community college (Wayne Community College) in Goldsboro, NC offers the ADN program and the LPN program. I thought you got a diploma after the completion of the LPN program but I am probably mistaken since I am not clear on the differentiation. I am not sure if it helps, but you can also bridge from LPN to ADN here in one year.
  6. by   suzy253
    Quote from doublej
    I don't know what diploma schools are today but back in the "dark ages", they were fantastic. It was three years- all year- one mo. off each yr. and by the time we were seniors, we were in charge of the floors with supervisors over us. Now that was a long time ago and I am sure that legally this could not be allowed today (that is, being in charge as senior student nurses). The biggest need in nursing (coming from a retiree who had young new nurses working under me) is "on hands" experience and learning to handle volumes of patients. Not easy but it comes at you once you have been graduated and face the real nursing world.
    Pretty much what it's like now...only we had the summer off. I just graduated for a 3-year diploma program and in our senior year we were doing management and rotated being charge, mod leader, and med nurse which exposed us to the 'real world' and pretty much got us up to speed. I can wholeheartedly recommend diploma programs. The clinical experience is very intense for the full three years. I've since done a 2-month orientation at the hospital I'm working on and am now on my own on the floors. I don't think I would be able to handle it if I hadn't been exposed to management and time management skills the way that we were. The adjustment has been pretty easy to handle.

    Also, 100% NCLEX pass rate for the last four years. We also had a 4-week (daily) NCLEX review course at school which I'm sure helped us all immensely.
    Last edit by suzy253 on Sep 28, '06
  7. by   Jolie
    I used to work at CMC-Pineville, back when it was Mercy South. My impression of the nursing program and students was very favorable. That was beck in the 1990's, so things may have changed, but it was a good program back then.

    While I am not trying to start an ADN-Diploma-BSN debate, I would encourage you to look at all options, and consider the career implications of each.

    In my opinion, Diploma programs produce capable and independent practitioners. I think it is a shame that they have diminished so in numbers.

    Goodluck!
  8. by   suzy253
    Quote from tinkerbellsmagicglit
    Hi I guess I am confused. What is a diploma program and how does it differ from the ADN and LPN program? Our community college (Wayne Community College) in Goldsboro, NC offers the ADN program and the LPN program. I thought you got a diploma after the completion of the LPN program but I am probably mistaken since I am not clear on the differentiation. I am not sure if it helps, but you can also bridge from LPN to ADN here in one year.
    Diploma programs are hospital-based rather than university/college based. Although we do have colleges that are affiliated with the diploma program and we took some courses there like Anatomy, Human Physiology, Dosage Calculations, and the Psych courses. You don't graduate with a 'degree' i.e. AD or BS but you can always go for that later if you are so inclined.
  9. by   Cherish
    I understand Queens is an ADN program and so is Mercy's since you get a diploma thru the hospital and an ADN degree thru carolina health college. I think Durhams is the only REAL diploma school since u only get a AD in health science thru mount olive. There all 2 year programs. BUT It doesnt matter which one I choose since I plan on get my RN-BSN I would rather have my hospital pay for it then me. Plus I already have 48 credit hours only need 4 more classes to get a AD. So I got the pre-req's that RN-BSN programs require bassically. Just wanted to see how these programs are as in class vs. clinicals, and how they are structured. How competitive it is to get in, etc.
  10. by   lalagrace
    Hi, I am currently enrolled at Watts school of Nursing in Durham. It has been a dipoloma program for 110 years. Now they are affiliated with mt olive college so that you get an associates degree as well as the diploma.
    It is an awesome program, with a lot of clincial time. It is old fashioned in a lot of ways, like the uniform and the cap(!), but you really get a great foundation. I would strongly advocate for this type of program esp. if your truly intrested in being a bedside nurse.
    la
  11. by   sanctuary
    Think of another single symbol of Nursing that is as easily identifiable and iconoclastic as our good ol' cap?
  12. by   RNinJune2007
    I go to Mercy Currently! We have a 100% NCLEX pass rate. It's a wonderful school, and I graduate may 4th.Full capacity is about 120-140 students, my classs began with 45 students and currently have 21.

    Mercy is pretty competitive, both in clinical and class portions. It is extremely difficult to get into. They accept students based on a "risk" assessment, giving points for different things.

    The passing score is 80+ (you make a 79 you're failing). It's EXTREMELY difficult and challenging, but we like to say, if you can make it to graduation, you can DEFINITELY pass NCLEX.

    Lots of great nurses are made every year at Mercy, it's a great school.

    GOOD LUCK!
    Last edit by RNinJune2007 on Oct 1, '06
  13. by   RNinJune2007
    Quote from Cherish
    I understand Queens is an ADN program and so is Mercy's since you get a diploma thru the hospital and an ADN degree thru carolina health college.
    Mercy is a DIPLOMA not adn school. CMC has two schools: CCHS which offers an ADN , and MERCY which offers a DIPLOMA in 18 months.

    Hoped to clear that up for you
  14. by   BSNtobe2009
    Queens college is now an Associate degree program. Their requirements are detailed on their website. However, it's a very, very expensive college.

Must Read Topics


close