Is working in the NICU a good idea for me, as a person with mild cerebral palsy?

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    I will be applying to an adn nursing program next year and am looking at possibly working in the NICU because it's not as physically demanding. It's important that it's not so physically demanding as I have a mild form of cerbral palsy which affects the coordination of my legs and feet.

    In my case of cerebral palsy, I am able to walk but not in a coordinately manner to a certain extent; and I do tend to get tired alittle quicker than the average person(physically leg and feet wise); but am able to stand for sufficient amounts of time. I was originally thinking of working in the ER as a nurse but in reality I don't think I would be able to handle it physically because there would be too much running around from room to room and I can't lift and carry regularly sized patients.

    ** The reason I'm thinking of working in the NICU and or nursery is because all my patients would be babies which I would be able to lift and they would be all in the same room so it wouldn't as physically demanding. Plus I plan on working only on the weekends sat and sun 12hr shifts. What do you guys think? Is this a good idea?
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    Quote from bella201
    I will be applying to an adn nursing program next year and am looking at possibly working in the NICU because it's not as physically demanding. It's important that it's not so physically demanding as I have a mild form of cerbral palsy which affects the coordination of my legs and feet. In my case of cerebral palsy, I am able to walk but not in a coordinately manner to a certain extent; and I do tend to get tired alittle quicker than the average person(physically leg and feet wise); but am able to stand for sufficient amounts of time. I was originally thinking of working in the ER as a nurse but in reality I don't think I would be able to handle it physically because there would be too much running around from room to room and I can't lift and carry regularly sized patients. ** The reason I'm thinking of working in the NICU and or nursery is because all my patients would be babies which I would be able to lift and they would be all in the same room so it wouldn't as physically demanding. Plus I plan on working only on the weekends sat and sun 12hr shifts. What do you guys think? Is this a good idea?
    Usually I lurk, but I had to put in my 2 cents here. NICU is physically demanding, not in a lifting heavy people since, but you've got to be quick on your feet. In my unit, the babies are not all in one room, but in pods. Some nights I can span 3 pods. If my baby alarms, I run if it's someone that needs stimulating. Some deliveries we go on are ran to. Like, no time for the elevator, take the stairs and run. Also, I don't know what area you're from, but my area doesn't hire ADNs in NICU. Just some things to think about. Good luck in finding an area you'll fit into!
    scrubsandasmile likes this.
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    Hey -lovelovelove thanks for your input I appreciate it! I know that not all NICU departments are the same and things may be done differently. When looking for NICU RN positions I plan on only applying to those where the unit is all on one floor where the babies are all in the same room or if it is more than one floor; I'd make sure that my assigned patients are on the same floor same room.

    After I get my Adn I plan getting my BSN for job security as I know many won't hire adn's and oh i'm in tx.

    How did you get your job?
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    NICU is definitely not as physically demanding as other specialties in terms of lifting, but you need to be very coordinated. Would you have any difficulty getting teeny babies in and out of isolettes while juggling multiple wires and vent tubing? You may also be standing for hours and hours during a delivery and while admitting a baby. NICU is no picnic. I think general care nursery would be better for you, if you can find a position in that field.
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    Well you still have to get through nursing school with mostly adult patients. What if you can't get a job in nicu, that's a very popular area..
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    Many units are going to single patient rooms, so you may still be spread out. We are in pods with 6 kids to a room, but for assignment purposes sometimes we are in 3 or 4 rooms. We also go to LD on our floor, but we can be called anywhere in the hospital such as ER or one of the adult ICUs where or mom's can be. No matter where you work, you have to be able to take any assignment and sometimes we can't promise things like you want, especially when you are on orientation.

    We also get bigger kids and kids that stay with us for a year, and they are deadweight sometimes, so you concept that we only get teeny kids is off. We get newborns who can weigh up to 12 or 13 pounds and older kids who are over 20.

    See how nursing school goes and go from there. NICU jobs can be hard to come by, you may have to work somewhere else to get in the door.
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    Thanks guys for the reality check you have given me alot to think about and I will most definitely take these things into consideration whether or not I choose to work in the NICU. Based on all this though, I think it would be a better fit for me to work in a nursery. I still have nursing school to go through so only then will I truly know if NICU or nursery or any other speciality is a better fit for me.

    **Can anyone elaborate on what it's like to work in a nursery? What can I expect? Duties of a nursery nurse?
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    You would still be going back and forth to the rooms, since the babies are in and out of the nursery. Not as critical though. Usually just normal labs and teaching for the parents etc.
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    Hey

    I would of thought an outpatients role would be more suitable for your needs shorter days, tend to be healthier patients not requiring much physical movement. I hope you find where you would like to be a that it suits you tho and I wish u all the luck for your future
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    You also wouldn't be able to control whether or not all your assigned patients would be in one room. It doesn't work like that. Being able to find a job that is just 12 hour Saturday and Sundays will not be that easy either.12 hour shifts are extremely exhausting as well.You may need to get some general experience before you will be able to work in the NICU.Not very many NICUs will hire new grads.


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