Job Positions in NICU

  1. Hello,

    I know you all are probably tired of hearing about students asking the same questions about the degree differences, which I already know all about. But the one question that still lingers in my brain after all of my research is the difference between a NNP, or a neonatal clinical nurse specialist, or a NICU RN. Are there any other positions that I don't know of in the NICU? What do they do exactly? I do want to eventually get my MSN, and I would like to be in a beside...more hands on position in the NICU. Please help clarify-it would be greatly appreciated from a student trying to choose the right path for my career! Thanks.
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   prmenrs
    A NNP or a Clinical Nurse Specialists are RNs with further graduate level education (usually @ Master's degree level). NNPs can do Histories and Physicals, proceedures usually done by MDs, provide ongoing care for babies, write orders, progress notes, discharge summaries--medically oriented tasks. CNSs often coordinate ongoing education for staff nurses, annual competencies required by regulatory agencies, they also might coordinate or conduct research. They often publish articles in nursing journals.

    Alot of what these advanced practice nurses do is dicatated by the environment in which they practice. A University/teaching setting is different, and has different needs, than a community hospital.

    Usually, you cannot proceed to this level of practice w/o a couple years of experience in a Level III NICU.
  4. by   aggiernwannabe
    Thanks for your response. It was very helpful to my search. Are most beside job positions mainly filled by regular RN's with their BSN degree? And can you also tell me what their daily duties and responsiblities are? One thing that I just set up was a shadowing of a NICU RN for a day in the next few months, so I know I will learn alot in the field I want get my degree in.
  5. by   natasha700
    Quote from aggiernwannabe
    Thanks for your response. It was very helpful to my search. Are most beside job positions mainly filled by regular RN's with [font=Comic Sans MS]their BSN degree? And can you also tell me what their daily duties and responsiblities are? One thing that I just set up was a shadowing of a NICU RN for a day in the next few months, so I know I will learn alot in the field I want get my degree in.

    RN's working bedside may or may not have their BSN. It is not a required degree to work. If you plan on furthering your practice or be in a managerial position then BSN is the way to go. It does not really matter when you are at the bedside. I have my ASN and function very well along with co workers who have their BSN. When you start choosing your path in nursing it will help you in the long run. I would like to do advance practice nursing and I need that BSN for starters. Some nurses opt for a 4 year program and some opt for 2 year but we still have the same license at least in California. :-)

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