I'm starting my NNP, need some advice from y'all! - page 2

Well, I'm putting this post here, because you all are like family, "sniff, sniff" and I've yet to meet someone on this website who is an NNP/SNNP and will answer posts. I've realized that I... Read More

  1. by   Brownbetty
    Hello there,

    Sorry I have not been around for awhile. I work 12 hours shifts/3 x a week where I work (The day usually runs longer with sign out etc to 13+ some days). I also know of NNPs who work 10 shifts/4 x a week. It all depends on the institution you work for, some people may even work 24 hour shifts.

    Yes as a new NNP I do find the job challenging at times but that is what I signed up for when I decided to become an NP. That is with any specialty. I truly do enjoy what I do.

    I am actually paid hourly which works really well for me while some other NNPs I know are salaried and sometimes do not get paid for overtime, unlike myself. It all depends what the institutions does. Feel free to send me a private message with your email address included to get specific details with certain questions.

    I hope that helps somewhat.

    Brownbetty :-)
  2. by   SteveNNP
    Welcome back, BB!!
  3. by   Brownbetty
    Thanks, I am working on birthing a baby
  4. by   SteveNNP
    Oh, well I won't distract you.... push away! (Please tell me you DON'T have a birth plan..)

    Birth Plan = Instant NICU admission with lots of labs and drugs.
  5. by   bayouchick02
    Wow, thank y'all sooo much for all ur input so far....this has really helped make things a little more clear for me! Okay, so the type of hours worked, salary pay vs. hourly pay and all of that just basically depends on the institution...I will keep y'all posted if i have anymore questions!!
  6. by   bayouchick02
    oh yeah, another question i have for those of y'all that are NNP's or SNNP's:

    Would you say that 2 years of level 3 NICU experience is sufficient enough for success as an NNP or in the NNP program? or would 1 year be okay? I know that most programs require 2-3 years, but I am really eager to get back to school and start the program.

    Also.....
    As far as pay is concerned, is this field one of the "higher paying" specialties that one can work as an NP? I know that CRNA's make tons of money too, but I guess pay just comes down to how much one works (overtime if hourly paid, etc, etc, etc).

    Thank y'all sooo sooo much, I love my new allnurses.com family!!!!
  7. by   Brownbetty
    Quote from SteveRN21
    Oh, well I won't distract you.... push away! (Please tell me you DON'T have a birth plan..)

    Birth Plan = Instant NICU admission with lots of labs and drugs.
    lol, I will be pushing in Feb or late Jan :-) No birth plan just simple request just my hubby, doc adn nurse in room. no need for a large peanut gallery. :-)

    bayouchick i hope i answered all of your questions via PM
  8. by   Love_2_Learn
    Concerning missing the bedside care...

    I work with a NNP who also does air transports during some of her days/nights off. She says this is where she gets her warm fuzzies relating to bedside care. I once asked her if she missed bedside care now that she is a NNP (she's been a NNP for almost 20 years) and she told me that she doesn't miss it as much as she thought she would and that the transports help her enjoy a little bedside nursing care.
    Last edit by Love_2_Learn on Dec 19, '07 : Reason: spelling error
  9. by   SteveNNP
    Well that's comforting.... I actually really want to do air/ground transport once I graduate. I've "kind" of been offered a transport coordinator position at the last place I worked....you never know....
  10. by   Brownbetty
    Depending on the institution you may be required to do some transport as an NNP. Also, no one says that once you become an NNP you cannot do agency as an RN to get in some bedside care if that is what your heart desires. I know some who do that.
  11. by   Brownbetty
    Quote from bayouchick02
    oh yeah, another question i have for those of y'all that are NNP's or SNNP's:

    Would you say that 2 years of level 3 NICU experience is sufficient enough for success as an NNP or in the NNP program? or would 1 year be okay? I know that most programs require 2-3 years, but I am really eager to get back to school and start the program.

    Also.....
    As far as pay is concerned, is this field one of the "higher paying" specialties that one can work as an NP? I know that CRNA's make tons of money too, but I guess pay just comes down to how much one works (overtime if hourly paid, etc, etc, etc).

    Thank y'all sooo sooo much, I love my new allnurses.com family!!!!
    i forgot to answer this question. I remember when I was completing my NNP program, the NCC made it a requirement for people to have 2 years experience in a Level 3 NICU before starting a NNP masters program.

    Check out the website http://www.nccnet.org :spin:

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