What's the easiest RN-BSN & MSN program in New York City

  1. 0
    Hey everyone,

    I just graduated not too long ago from Queens Borough Community College with an ADN in nursing. While I had a great time learning about nursing, I didn't particularly like the fuss that some of these programs make with regards to making the process so damn complex.

    Are there any programs in New York City that are a little more lax with regards to attaining the BSN (via the RN-BSN route)? In other words, I am not asking for a flat out easy program that gives away grades, not at all, I'm more interested in a program that makes learning worth while, yet puts less stress on making you freak out over making a grade or trying to make the cut. I find that many of these programs try so hard to keep a reputation consisting of being the "most" challenging/demanding that they forget that sometimes in the process the students aren't able to retain as much as they should because they are more worried & concerned about just getting that grade to keep above the curve.

    If any of you have a good program in mind that concentrates more on teaching as opposed to brutal testing, please let me know.

    Also, with that in mind, if any of you know of a similar program to attain an MSN in Nurse Practitioner, make it known..

    If you don't want to publicly state a program's name here for fear of backlash, feel free to send me a private message.

    Thanks!!
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  4. 7 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    I don't know of any but have been told by many that getting a BSN or MSN after your ADN is way easier. It's not as demanding as the ADN you'll be focusing more on writing papers. It doesn't come close to what you have been through in the ADN program.
  6. 0
    Quote from Wsmith16
    I don't know of any but have been told by many that getting a BSN or MSN after your ADN is way easier. It's not as demanding as the ADN you'll be focusing more on writing papers. It doesn't come close to what you have been through in the ADN program.
    Everyone keeps saying that...

    For some reason, everyone keeps saying that most BSN and MSN programs are filled with more papers to write, so much so that you will find your final grades being a combination of a percentage from papers and tests as opposed to just tests as they did in our ADN program.
  7. 0
    WSmith,

    Are you in a BSN program yourself?

    Thanks,
    Nancy
  8. 0
    No, I am in an ADN program. I have a prior BS degree in another field & I have found that nothing can compare to the amount of work & stress I have had in the ADN . So I am looking forward to getting a BS/MSN--it'll be work but again it won't be anything like we've experinced. It'll actually be a more supportive environment since the colleges/hospitals want nurses to further their education.
  9. 2
    When I initially read the title of your thread, I thought, "I'm not so sure I'd want someone who wanted an 'easy' program to be taking care of me." However, after reading your thread, I TOTALLY understand. My diploma program was REALLY challenging (and I had a bachelor's and part of master's from very reputable schools). As much as I dislike the term "critical thinking," the program REALLY taught me how to do this. I am 50% done with an online RN-BSN program and, for the most part, it is ALL fluff. I am SO tired of writing papers. It essentially amounts to rehashing someone else's thoughts. I would recommend looking into some online programs (especially since you already have an undergraduate degree). I don't particularly like online courses, but, considering we (ADN nurses) are taking care of the same patients that BSN-prepared nurses are, we're essentially just paying for the piece of paper. Good luck! I'm done with my contract in one year and I'm applying to graduate programs in NYC (I lived there for five years).
    CeceStar5 and x_coastie like this.
  10. 1
    Quote from AWanderingMinstral
    When I initially read the title of your thread, I thought, "I'm not so sure I'd want someone who wanted an 'easy' program to be taking care of me." However, after reading your thread, I TOTALLY understand. My diploma program was REALLY challenging (and I had a bachelor's and part of master's from very reputable schools). As much as I dislike the term "critical thinking," the program REALLY taught me how to do this. I am 50% done with an online RN-BSN program and, for the most part, it is ALL fluff. I am SO tired of writing papers. It essentially amounts to rehashing someone else's thoughts. I would recommend looking into some online programs (especially since you already have an undergraduate degree). I don't particularly like online courses, but, considering we (ADN nurses) are taking care of the same patients that BSN-prepared nurses are, we're essentially just paying for the piece of paper. Good luck! I'm done with my contract in one year and I'm applying to graduate programs in NYC (I lived there for five years).
    Hey Minstral,

    I don't mind doing an RN-BSN program online. If it's all just writing papers (boring but still effective way of learning), it beats having to show up to class 2-3 times a week to do the same thing we have already done before.

    Which program are you completing now for your BSN? Also, if you'd prefer (for privacy purposes) feel free to [PM Member]

    Thanks,
    Nancy
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    Last edit by SteveNNP on Jul 21, '08 : Reason: please do not post email address per site TOS
    CeceStar5 likes this.
  11. 1
    Quote from AWanderingMinstral
    When I initially read the title of your thread, I thought, "I'm not so sure I'd want someone who wanted an 'easy' program to be taking care of me."
    I kind of thought the same thing too, but I do get it. And everyone who posted is right, it is nowhere near the workload of the ADN. It is fluff (and that's exactly what I tell my ADN students, but it is work too. There were hardly any tests, mostly papers, or group projects. There is no way to escape that (even online you will do group projects).

    For some reason, everyone keeps saying that most BSN and MSN programs are filled with more papers to write, so much so that you will find your final grades being a combination of a percentage from papers and tests as opposed to just tests as they did in our ADN program.
    that's exactly how it works. It is so much easier, but it is work, and it is time consuming. Not anything like the ADN, and there are no careplans and stuff like that. Depending on your class, you may have to work up a patient you would see in real life (like if you're taking a physical assessment class, or a nutrition class, or a cultural assignment). But you will not do everything you already learned in QCC.

    There are also a lot of non-nursing classes, and yes, there's no way around them.
    Just like any bachelor's degree, you need history, english and all that other stuff. You have to go in with an open mind, and you might as well try to be interested in them. Especially if you go to a school like Molloy (where I went), where you have to take Philosophy and Theology. I actually found them kinda interesting.

    Now, the Masters... no matter what you do..... is tough!! No way around it. It's much much much more time consuming, especially if you go for the NP. It's like applea and oranges, comared to the AD. I did my masters in Nursing Education (also at molloy) and there were tons of papers and group projects. Even online, it is tough.
    CeceStar5 likes this.


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