Real Life in NYC - page 2

I have some questions for all the NYC nurses out there, as I wish to relocate there someday (i.e., approx 2 years or so): 1. Do you love living in NYC? Why or why not? 2. Any hospitals there... Read More

  1. by   SarasotaRN2b
    Quote from mfe916
    Why New York CIty, Rochester, Ny had wonderful magnet hospitals..
    Mel in NY
    Nothing against Rochester, but there is no comparison to the energy and excitement of Manhattan.
  2. by   SarasotaRN2b
    Quote from tinderbox
    Sorry, but Rochester is not NYC. I love the urbane, chaotic, multiethnic, highly energetic, and fast pace of the ultimate city environment. I already live in a place with a slow pace and pretty scenery. I'm looking for something more urban. I love all the elements that living in a large city bring. I crave that extra stimulation of city life.
    You said it Tinderbox!!!
  3. by   jellie22
    Would you recommend any travel companies?
  4. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from tinderbox
    i have some questions for all the nyc nurses out there, as i wish to relocate there someday (i.e., approx 2 years or so):

    1. do you love living in nyc? why or why not? i lived in nyc for ten years. and i loved every minute of it. there were the parks, zoos, museums, lincoln center, broadway, the village, more then 365 different types of restaurants, central park, horse back riding, to name a few.

    2. any hospitals there with magnet status? there are several with that status.

    3. which hospitals there have the best reputations (in terms of quality of care, treatment of nurses and staff)? i worked at mt. sinia and new york hospital which were good places to work.

    4. what's your average annual salary and is it enough to live on in expensive nyc? i'm single, young, no kids, so trying to support a family would not be an issue for me. i lived and worked back in the 70s.

    5. oh and i guess while i'm at it, to any of the single nyc rns out there, how is the dating scene in the city? my so still lives and works there. would offer you his name but i think he might be a little old for you but not for me:roll

    6. is travel nursing the best way to get to nyc, in the first place?

    ps- the reason that i'm waiting approx 2 years to relocate is because i am a recent grad (spring '05) and feel like i need to chalk up some more experience. i'm currently an rn in oregon, working med-surg/tele at a major teaching hospital.

    thanks!!!!!! your inputs will be greatly appreciated.
    i have returned to the city frequently to visit it. if i could, i would return to live there. i miss the city a great deal.

    grannynurse
  5. by   SarasotaRN2b
    Yes, Cross Country travcorps. I've heard a lot of good things about it. Check out their website.
  6. by   TigerSN
    Hey Tinderbox, I will be graduating in May, and I plan to move to NYC next summer. I am applying to Mt. Sinai, NYU, Lenox Hill, NYP, and Sloan Kettering as of right now. I thought about doing travel nursing, but I really just want to get out of New Orleans now. I don't want to wait 2 years. NYU has a nursing residency program for new grads. I'm not too sure about the orientation programs at the other hospitals.

    Good luck!
  7. by   tinderbox
    I know. Sometimes I wonder if I should just move there and just go for it and not wait another year or year and a half to get hired on with a travel company. There's nothing really holding me here in OR (except great friends and an awesome apt.), and I wonder...
    I dunno. Just thinking out loud.
  8. by   MagicalThinking
    Quote from tinderbox
    i have some questions for all the nyc nurses out there, as i wish to relocate there someday (i.e., approx 2 years or so):

    1. do you love living in nyc? why or why not?

    2. any hospitals there with magnet status?

    3. which hospitals there have the best reputations (in terms of quality of care, treatment of nurses and staff)?

    4. what's your average annual salary and is it enough to live on in expensive nyc? i'm single, young, no kids, so trying to support a family would not be an issue for me.

    5. oh and i guess while i'm at it, to any of the single nyc rns out there, how is the dating scene in the city?

    6. is travel nursing the best way to get to nyc, in the first place?

    ps- the reason that i'm waiting approx 2 years to relocate is because i am a recent grad (spring '05) and feel like i need to chalk up some more experience. i'm currently an rn in oregon, working med-surg/tele at a major teaching hospital.

    thanks!!!!!! your inputs will be greatly appreciated.

    hi tinderbox, i lived in nyc for 6 years and while i wasn't a nurse in the city i can answer your non-nursing questions...btw i am in sc right now but i'm moving back to nyc in august to go to bmcc and i've only been away for 10 months soooooo as to your first question living in nyc is a love/hate experience...on one hand you will meet fascinating people, experience a million different cultures and have more opportunity but there is also alot of stress and it is expensive and the first few months are confusing when your learning to get around on the subways and stuff, but i personally think there are far more pros than cons. living in nyc is like living in a different country in alot of ways...every where you go people are speaking different languages and the way of life is a bit different...like when you go shopping you go to little boutiques and individual shops not a mall (although there is one mall in the city but it's lame) also instead of home depot for paint, etc. you'd go to a little hardware store like in europe. you'd be amazed the variety of shops there are.. you can buy anything and everything...and the food is amazing!!!...there's one street called "the indian street" it's on 6th street between 2nd ave. and ave. a in the e. village...the whole street is indian restaurants and at night they're all lit up and as you walk down the waiters stand outside and haggle prices with you...like one guy will say "hey come eat here i'll give you free wine" and the next will say "no don't go there i'll give you a free entree" or whatever...can you imagine that happening anywhere else..lol...as far as being expensive well yes it is...you can drop $50 easy just in one day and not know where it all went ( and that isn't just me ) so you have to be careful if you're on a budget...to save cash for $70 you can get an unlimited metrocard for the subway and busses. also where you live makes a big difference i would suggest living in:
    brooklyn- in these neighborhoods...park slope, williamsburg, greenpoint, bushwick & caroll gardens try to get as close to the city as you can get but do not live in williamsburg or bushwick if it's not on the l subway line or if it's past the 7th stop and do not live in red hook, flatbush or bed-stuy ).
    queens- can be nice if you're in long island city or close to the city.
    as for living in manhattan:
    harlem- below 116th street and on the west side is best. harlem is very up and coming ..lots of new buildings and stores and very safe now w/ big apts..
    upper west side- up and coming area and cheap with big apts.
    downtown/financial district- you can find somegood spots here sometimes ever since 9/11

    as for being single well there are tons of hot single guys in nyc...the hottest people i have ever seen have been in nyc. it is very easy to date and there are tons of bars, the kind of guy you want determines where you should go...
    if you want a rocker or hipster or artist type go to the e. village, union square or lower east side bars.
    if you want a business guy go to the bars in midtown or on the upper east side ...
    if you want a guy with money go to the upper east side, upper west side, tribeca, union square (the chic spots), soho and the greenwhich village.

    personally i think you should just go for it and move as soon as you can, b/c the longer you wait things could come up to prevent you from moving...and look at it this way the 2 years you wait are 2 years you're not in nyc....ok i'm exhausted ..lol..anymore questions just pm me-
  9. by   GrnHonu99
    This is the best post

    I was reading the OPs post and I thought that could be me! I really want to move to NYC after I graduate. I also thought about travel nursing but I'd have to stay around ohio for awhile to get some experience.

    I have so many good friends living in the city and I, like the OP feel like its just something I need to do.

    My fiencee is finishing up his bachelors degree in landscape architechture and when hes done im home free and the first stop on my agenda is NYC!!!!

    Im so excited.

    Keep me posted guys!
  10. by   tinderbox
    YOu may have it a bit easier than I would. I'd be making the move alone, and I know no one in the city, except for a brother of a friend that I've met only once. Ahhh!
  11. by   GrnHonu99
    Quote from tinderbox
    YOu may have it a bit easier than I would. I'd be making the move alone, and I know no one in the city, except for a brother of a friend that I've met only once. Ahhh!

    you would know me!! lol...well sorta! Part of me wants to go before my fiencee finishes his degree...he could be here for a few more years and im so tired of living in ohio! Thats why I was thinking of travel nursing where I could do a shorter assignments while he was still in ohio. We will see!
  12. by   tinderbox
    I wouldn't wait for travel nursing, esp since you already know people there. YOu're still in school and then after school, you'd have to work AT LEAST 2 yrs before a travel agency would take you on. Seriously, I keep hearing that over and over. The good reputable agencies require AT least 2 yrs RN experience before they will take you on. Just thinking to think about.
  13. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from tinderbox
    However, she told me to stay away from a couple hospitals.. can't remember the names now, except that they both started with Bs... Beth Israel? and Bellevue.
    BI on the lower East side (there are several divisions of BI in that area), some travelers have difficulty with. There are some great things and great people there, but the management and structure is terrible. Imagine having to bring your own paper (for copies) and toilet paper (BRs run out on the weekend and it takes several phone calls and practically an act of congress to get one stinking roll from the lockup) to work. Paper MARs that are handwritten and are used for a week, before being rewritten. Imagine a tube system that neither goes to the pharmacy or the lab (WHAT GOOD IS IT!!!!), and people keeping tubes in the refrigerator because it is the only way that they won't get swiped and that you can have one in an emergency. I think I actually counted five THE ENTIRE 13 WEEKS THAT I WAS THERE. That is about one every 2-3 weeks.

    My favorite was the rule that Blood Cultures be drawn and ABX started on a neutropenic fever patient within 1 hour. It is a great rule but difficult if not impossible in this facility. You receive the patient, get them settled, have to draw and send the labs (no phlebotomist), start the IV ( no IV team), admit the patient, get the allergies to pharmacy, the orders to pharmacy (no tube system for either of these on the floor that I was on). Some units have a fax but it requires a security code that only"special" people have access to...and they are rarely working. Then you have to leave the floor, to go to the pharmacy and wait in a line of other nurses for your ABX. Then pharmacy tells you that the ABX needs ID approval, so you have to go back upstairs, hunt down the MD/intern, get the order changed or ID approval, and then you go back downstairs, just to wait in line AGAIN. And you still have 5-8 other patients receiving blood, chemo, etc. while you are enduring this garbage.

    The ancillary personnel frequently were lazy, did shoddy work. There were some great ones but there were some that I would not have wished on my worst enemy. I had one that literally had a cell phone bead in her ear while doing vitals and care...for 90 straight minutes. And the manager did nothing about it.

    During the winter, there is frequent mandated OT (not required of travelers but helped out anyway). They would literally call the unit 15 minutes before shift ended, to mandate you stay 8 more hours.

    You get the idea. This and many other chores were made incredibly difficult.

    While I am sure that there were better units in the facility, I heard many of these same complaints from other travelers on other units.

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