North Shore University RN Fellowship? Input needed! - page 2

I'm interviewing at North Shore University Manhasset for critical care fellowship. Everything seems to be great... nurse recruiter friendly and helpful, so is the floor where I interviewed. Anyone... Read More

  1. by   Anjeleyes214
    Hello All,

    I was wondering about the RN Fellowship Program. I applied and just received an email stating they want me to call to schedule an interview.

    I haven't been on an interview in a very very long time, so pretty nervous and curious as to what type of questions they ask. If anyone can offer more info it would be greatly appreciated.

    I read all the below info and wow program sounds great!! This is the only program I've found that take GN's and Im very interested in it.

    Any information anyone can offer would be awesome!!

    I'll officially be a GN in 5 weeks!! almost there!!!
  2. by   SarasotaRN2b
    Quote from Anjeleyes214
    Hello All,

    I was wondering about the RN Fellowship Program. I applied and just received an email stating they want me to call to schedule an interview.

    I haven't been on an interview in a very very long time, so pretty nervous and curious as to what type of questions they ask. If anyone can offer more info it would be greatly appreciated.

    I read all the below info and wow program sounds great!! This is the only program I've found that take GN's and Im very interested in it.

    Any information anyone can offer would be awesome!!

    I'll officially be a GN in 5 weeks!! almost there!!!
    First congratulations on your interview...that's great! It's something I am definitely looking into when I finish school (I'm only finishing semester #1/#4).

    Remember, an interview is a 2-way street...on their part, they'll probably ask you for some of your nursing school experiences and where you have strengths and weaknesses are...be honest, they'll probably want to know how you handle stress as this will be a very stressful area that you will be going into. On your part, ask questions about their residency...if there is something not clear to you, ask about it. A big concern they will be having is wanting to make sure that you will succeed in the program and stay with them (retention is a big concern) due to the high cost of training a new employee.

    You'll be fine! Let us know how it goes!
    Kris
  3. by   billythekid
    I'm finding the NSLIJ Fellowship to be a great critical care experience...
  4. by   SarasotaRN2b
    Quote from billythekid
    I'm finding the NSLIJ Fellowship to be a great critical care experience...
    More, more....that's just a teaser!
  5. by   neeniebean
    Quote from billythekid
    I'm finding the NSLIJ Fellowship to be a great critical care experience...
    Yay!!!! I'm glad that it's going well for you!!!
  6. by   billythekid
    Well, the 12 month fellowship is divided into three semesters:

    1st semester (10 weeks long): conducted monday thru friday (~8-4)... incudes four half-days of lecture/hands on modules, 2 half-days of clinical oridentation on the floor you have been hired for, a half-day of simulation, and 2-3 half-days of ECCO training (Essentials of Critical care Orientation).
    From what I understand, this type of orientation is unique, and I found to be a terrific experience. In my group, there is a great sense of comradery in the program b/c you spend so much time together in small groups. Also, the nursing educators are really outstanding, and willing to take the time to explain the principles of critical care as they pertain to an entry level RN on the unit.

    2nd semester (12-16 weeks): assigned to a master preceptor whose schedule you are required to match. work 12 hr shifts

    3rd semester (~6 months): during this time you are factored into the nurse count. You work independently, but are expected to come across situations you might not be familiar with and need to ask questions and/or for help. There is 24 hr access to in hospital nursing educator.

    Since I am just finishing up semester 1, I haven't personally experienced semester 2 / 3, but I relayed what I have been told.

    If you are thinking of working in an ICU, IMHO the NSLIJ program should definitely be at the Top of your list.

    Let me know if you have any other q's....
  7. by   Wsmith16
    Please continue to keep us informed. I am graduateing in Januray & LIJ's fellowship program is at the top of my list.

    Hoping things continue to go well with you.
  8. by   SarasotaRN2b
    Just wanted to bump this to the top to see how BillytheKid is doing!

    I'm living in anticipation!

    Kris
  9. by   mother23
    I just wanted to inform anyone who is willing to listen about the LIJ fellowship program. I entered the program as a new grad. At first the program seemed great. But the problem started when we got on the floors. Many of the preceptors were unfriendly and the management team on the units was very very mean to say the least. They instantly created an intimidating and uncomfortable environment. If one person doesn't like you than you are basically screwed. Especially on the CTICU at LIJ. I would suggest that you proceed with caution if you are considering entering the program. The standards are high but there aren't enough resources once you get to the floors to live up to the standards. I want to stress again that the main problem is the management team. There were many nights when I would pass by the manager's office (who by the way looks like she isn't a day over 23) and I could hear her and her friends (who happened to be the assistant manager and "resource nurse") snickering about the new nurses on the unit and who they didn't like and who wasn't "fitting in". Because of this I along with many other new hires had a terrible time adjusting and most of us (at least 15 out of 20) left before the first year was over. I have never once regretted leaving that place. LIJ has a good name but the hospital isn't a nurse friendly institution and you will learn that very quickly. Also, the nurse educator for the fellowship who works for LIJ is very difficult to work with. Just thought I'd give you an honest opinion. Please don't let this be the only place you consider. Ask them what their turn over rate is. Nurses leave that place as quickly as they come in. I have worked at many other places since and I have never been to a place that was worse than there. Good Luck!
  10. by   Wsmith16
    Thanks for giving us a perspective of what the "other" side looks like. Did you leave before your contract was up? I heard that the program req a 2 yr commitment so I wanted to know if you had "payout" before you left. Or were there any repurcussions for breaking the contract.

    Thanks
  11. by   mother23
    They tell you that it's a two year contract, but really it isn't. There was no paperwork or anything that we were required to sign. They were expanding their units, they needed nurses and we needed jobs. So what they called it was a two year "promise", which really wasn't legally binding in any way. So yes I left even before my first year was up as did many of my coworkers because the environment was so hostile. We all got our payouts and just simply moved on. This program is based on a great concept, it's the people you have to work with that make it so unpleasant during semesters two and three. Many of the fellows leave within a year or two and that has been consistent for almost every class that they have had. They tell you that if you're having a tough time and don't like the unit you are on that they would rather transfer you somewhere than have you leave the hospital all together but many of us learned that this really wasn't the case. They often became very angry when we suggested something like that (they being the managers, educator etc.etc). Another BIG problem is that the preceptor's word is GOLDEN no matter what happened. So if your preceptor doesn't like you, the management team made sure you were out of there pretty quickly. If you were struggling with something, word would spread like wild fire and soon everyone saw you only from that perspective. It was really sad. We used to hate going in to work. Some of my coworkers would just cry because someone had just humiliated them in front of everyone..... Anyways,Good Luck with whatever decision you make!!! Remember nursing is full of wonderful oppurtunities and you can either make it great or be miserable.
  12. by   Wsmith16
    Thanks again for giving us another perspective. I'll be on the job hunt next yr I want to be in a hospital where staff is somewhat supportive to new grads. Your thoughts really helped/
  13. by   Ehope
    "We all got our payouts and just simply moved on. "

    Mother23, thanks for taking the time to write this. I was seriously considering applying for this once done with school, but if the situation is that dire I don't know if it's worth it. I want to get ICU experience and they were the only place I really found that hire GNs. If anyone knows of any other places that would hire a new grad ADN in the ICU I would be very grateful if you shared.

    Can you explain what you mean by the payouts? Is that something you had to pay them?

    Also, I know that you have to take critical care essentials I and II. Not to sound stupid, but do you get to keep that on your record if you leave early?

    thanks,
    E
    Last edit by Ehope on Jun 15, '08

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