Long Island nursing!!

  1. Hello!!!
    I am moving to NY within a few months. I am from VA. My hubby is from Long Island though, so that's why we are moving. I was wondering what is a good community college to go to for nursing?!������ (ADN program) any tips would be nice!! Any advice would be awesome to!! Thanks!!!
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   adrianjh99
    Suffolk county community college from what I hear is really good and reputable my cousin attends she enjoys it I attend Suffolk but I'm taking prereqs to get into a nursing program
  4. by   angjam
    Thank you so much!! How are you liking the college so far? Nursing is what I am going back to school for as well. This is definitely going to be an adventure haha. So the college is Suffolk community collge?
  5. by   adrianjh99
    yes ,I like it is my first semester of college is taking you know your standard prereqs ENG 101, A&P 1, HIS101
  6. by   MurseJJ
    Nassau Community College is also great. I did some pre-reqs there and was admitted, but ended up going elsewhere.

    Also, just FYI, if you plan on working in a hospital in the NYC metro area, the vast majority of hospitals either strongly prefer or require a BSN. When I went to an info session for NCC's program, I asked how job placement is for the graduates. The dean said that some work in long term care, while others go directly into an RN-BSN program because that's what's needed to be hired in the hospitals (there are exceptions of course). NCC does have linkage programs with other institutions for the BSN, and I'm assuming SCC does as well, so plan on going into your BSN right after the program to maximize your opportunities.

    I was set on going to NCC 3 years ago, mostly for the savings and also the easy commute since I don't live too far. It was the first school I was admitted to. However after that info session and really thinking about it once I had all of my options, I ended up going to a BSN program. No regrets.

    Good luck!
  7. by   angjam
    @ Mursejj, that makes sense. I definitely want to be an ER nurse. I was reading some of the other posts, and it seems like the process to being accepted is either hard or confusing....what is your thoughts on that?
  8. by   MurseJJ
    Quote from angjam
    @ Mursejj, that makes sense. I definitely want to be an ER nurse. I was reading some of the other posts, and it seems like the process to being accepted is either hard or confusing....what is your thoughts on that?
    The admission process for NCC? When I applied it was based on your GPA in four pre-reqs (English I, A&P I, Psych I, and I believe stats was the last one), as well as a standardized test, the TEAS. They also gave preference for living in Nassau County. They then rank you by the GPA and TEAS score, and go down from the top until the class is full. The website has the latest information on the admissions process you should check out:

    http://www.ncc.edu/programsandcourse...dmission.shtml

    It looks like they only base the GPA on grades from courses that directly apply to the program if you're coming in with prior college credits. If you did well in those courses, and do well on the TEAS (there are review books), you should be competitive.

    Good luck!
  9. by   ambitiousjnyc
    Wow, I use to live in VA, which part?

    BMCC (Borough of Manhattan Community College) is good.
  10. by   angjam
    thank you so much. You've been very helpful. It's definitely a lot different then down south. At least the states I was living in. I know the cost of living is high, but do the nurses get paid good money?
  11. by   angjam
    @ ambitiousjnyc I am from Williamsburg. What part Did you live in? And how do you like New York?
  12. by   imhorsemackerel
    I know Suffolk just started a joint program with Stony Brook University. I don't know all the details, but only those who apply for the RN fall program are eligible. Also, the top students are picked. I'm guessing they have advanced/exemplary TEAS scores.
  13. by   MurseJJ
    Quote from angjam
    thank you so much. You've been very helpful. It's definitely a lot different then down south. At least the states I was living in. I know the cost of living is high, but do the nurses get paid good money?
    It depends on the hospital, with city/state public hospitals typically paying less. I was hired at Stony Brook first, and their salary was 75K with night differential for new grads. I was grateful for the opportunity but decided to hold out for a position at NYP/Columbia, where I worked as a nursing attendant. The salary for new grads was 96K with night diff (6K) when I started almost a year ago. After a year that goes up to 100K (with night diff). You then can get differentials for experience (starting at 2 years), MSN/doctorate, certification, charge/preceptor, and clinical ladder. You also get paid for council/committee meetings and training you go to, get continuing education days for conferences, etc.

    From what I understand, NYU, Mount Sinai, and Sloan Kettering pay similarly to NYP/Columbia (not too sure about Cornell, though I'm sure it's similar as well), with Sloan having the highest starting. I believe the city public hospitals are closer in pay to Stony Brook, slightly less (their salaries are online, when I looked a year ago I believe I saw around 69K starting without differential). In LI, St. Francis and Northwell aren't too much lower than the private city hospitals, at least in the mid 80s starting.
  14. by   angjam
    Quote from MurseJJ
    It depends on the hospital, with city/state public hospitals typically paying less. I was hired at Stony Brook first, and their salary was 75K with night differential for new grads. I was grateful for the opportunity but decided to hold out for a position at NYP/Columbia, where I worked as a nursing attendant. The salary for new grads was 96K with night diff (6K) when I started almost a year ago. After a year that goes up to 100K (with night diff). You then can get differentials for experience (starting at 2 years), MSN/doctorate, certification, charge/preceptor, and clinical ladder. You also get paid for council/committee meetings and training you go to, get continuing education days for conferences, etc.

    From what I understand, NYU, Mount Sinai, and Sloan Kettering pay similarly to NYP/Columbia (not too sure about Cornell, though I'm sure it's similar as well), with Sloan having the highest starting. I believe the city public hospitals are closer in pay to Stony Brook, slightly less (their salaries are online, when I looked a year ago I believe I saw around 69K starting without differential). In LI, St. Francis and Northwell aren't too much lower than the private city hospitals, at least in the mid 80s starting.
    Ok ok, thanks girl!!!!! I appreciate it. I am hoping to start school next year in the spring. I have to take the placement test and everything first. Gosh I hate math I am excited about the move, but nervous as well.

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