++Should I transfer from La Guardia Community College!?!?

  1. 0
    Hello everybody! I have finished my prerequisites at La Guardia Community College with a GPA of 3.95 and applied for the

    nursing program with eventual start at fall 2010. Very prob I will get into the nursing program. Since it takes at least 2 years

    to finish the clinical program I was thinking that it is a waste of time because i could be finishing a BSN in three years. So

    that is why I would like to transfer to a BSN program. Since it is becoming very difficult to get into nursing programs lately I am

    undecided between the security of an ASN at La Guardia or transferring towards a BSN. Also moving outside NYC in places like

    Stony Brook or Binghamton would be a problem since I can't afford a car at the moment. At the same time most of the job adds

    I see ''prefer'' a BSN. If you have any ideas or suggestions I would greatly appreciate them, Thanks.


    Ervin,
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  3. 14 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    I don't think any nursing program is a waste of time.

    You have two options.

    Start the clinical program at LaGuardia and finish in two years. Find a job, and then go back to school to get your BSN and utilize tuition reimbursement benefits. This is the cheaper route.

    Find and apply to a BSN program and finish in 2 or 3 years as well, but pay more to do so. As long as you can easily transfer into a BSN program, this is a definite option.

    Both options give you a BSN in the end.

    Best of luck!
    caffeineRx likes this.
  5. 0
    Thanks for your reply, my dilemma comes mainly from the dissatisfaction that I feel with this school every day more. But

    hopefully it is worth the work i am putting into it.
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    Last edit by caffeineRx on Mar 12, '10
  7. 0
    If you know you're going to be on a waiting list I say go for the Bachelor's. By the time you get off the waiting list you could be almost done. Depending on how many pre-reqs you have (since Associate degree programs usually only require 4 or 5) you might have to spend between 1-2 years finishing pre-reqs for the bachelor's (my pre-reqs took 3 years).

    As for the school, CUNY schools are frustrating in general because of the administration and since they are run by the city, they can be a complete headache. Private Universities have their frustrations too, trust me lol.
  8. 0
    Hi,
    I graduated from Laguardia's nursing program this past Dec. I have also been a Hunter College employee/student since Sept. 2004. The Laguardia clinical component will take you 2 years. Honestly, for most CUNY schools, if not all, the deadlines for Fall 2010 admission are either over, or close to over, especially with their highly competitive nursing programs. I know Hunter College is flooded with Nursing program applicants and even if you apply now, it's too late for Fall 2010 admission. But I don't recommend Hunter College anyways, cause their administration is horrible, and their nursing department does not care about its students. I went through quite an ordeal with the nursing department, so I'm trying to spread the word about the school. Anyways, all personal matters aside, I recommend you attend Laguardia's nursing program. In retrospect, I loved their program. The professors are good, they truly care about their students, and the student body works together.
    I received my RN license in Feb, and am in the process of starting an online RN-BSN program at Utica College. It is better, in my eyes, to receive your AAS in nursing, then continue on from there. There are several advantages to this: You can start working right away (assuming there are jobs out there when you graduate), the facility you work for may pay for you education fully or partially, the RN-BSN programs are easier to get into than going straight into a BSN program, you can complete your education online if you wish, you won't waste time waiting to start Spring 2011 and you might have to take more pre-reqs prior to starting a BSN program.
    I understand that many jobs require a BSN. Some hospitals require a BSN, others will take you in if you're working towards your BSN and others have added the BSN requirement due to the financial climate. Honestly, if the economy is bad like it is now, having a BSN won't help you that much. I have heard of students with BSNs that cant find jobs, and students with an AAS that have found jobs (I am one). A new grad is a new grad, whether you have an AAS or a BSN, the job hunt will be tough due to the economy. This is just my opinion based on my experiences and what I've discussed with other people who have gone a similar route as me.
  9. 0
    Wow melloyello13 you sent me such an insightful post. First of all congrats for your graduation and I am happy that you found a job in these times. Did La Guardia help you or you found it yourself? By the way good luck with your BSN.


    Quote from melloyello13
    Hi,
    I graduated from Laguardia's nursing program this past Dec. I have also been a Hunter College employee/student since Sept. 2004. The Laguardia clinical component will take you 2 years. Honestly, for most CUNY schools, if not all, the deadlines for Fall 2010 admission are either over, or close to over, especially with their highly competitive nursing programs. I know Hunter College is flooded with Nursing program applicants and even if you apply now, it's too late for Fall 2010 admission. But I don't recommend Hunter College anyways, cause their administration is horrible, and their nursing department does not care about its students. I went through quite an ordeal with the nursing department, so I'm trying to spread the word about the school. Anyways, all personal matters aside, I recommend you attend Laguardia's nursing program. In retrospect, I loved their program. The professors are good, they truly care about their students, and the student body works together.
    I received my RN license in Feb, and am in the process of starting an online RN-BSN program at Utica College. It is better, in my eyes, to receive your AAS in nursing, then continue on from there. There are several advantages to this: You can start working right away (assuming there are jobs out there when you graduate), the facility you work for may pay for you education fully or partially, the RN-BSN programs are easier to get into than going straight into a BSN program, you can complete your education online if you wish, you won't waste time waiting to start Spring 2011 and you might have to take more pre-reqs prior to starting a BSN program.
    I understand that many jobs require a BSN. Some hospitals require a BSN, others will take you in if you're working towards your BSN and others have added the BSN requirement due to the financial climate. Honestly, if the economy is bad like it is now, having a BSN won't help you that much. I have heard of students with BSNs that cant find jobs, and students with an AAS that have found jobs (I am one). A new grad is a new grad, whether you have an AAS or a BSN, the job hunt will be tough due to the economy. This is just my opinion based on my experiences and what I've discussed with other people who have gone a similar route as me.
  10. 0
    Laguardia didn't help me. They don't really have the capacity to help their students. There just aren't any jobs. What Laguardia did do was provide information about possible internships with hospitals which are supposed to help you get a foot in the door. I would recommend that you do an internship if you can a semester or two before you graduate (most hospitals want you to have finished with Med Surg I). Though if the hospital has a hiring freeze, it might unfortunately not help. I didn't do an internship, which I kind of regret.

    Not too long ago, hospitals would recruit nursing students right out of college, and they would have jobs immediately after getting their license. That's not the case at all anymore. The key is to apply to as many places as you can. I applied to 50 places, and got ONE call back. I emailed, faxed, called, applied online, went to open houses etc- and one response. I've read on forums about new grads applying to even more places and not getting a job. By the time you graduate, I think the economy will be significantly better in terms of job prospects.

    Thank you for your wishes =) It's been a long road, but it all paid off in the end.
  11. 0
    I recently got accepted to LaGuardia and hope to start in the Fall. I am switching carreers, and cannot pursue a BSN right now do to financial reasons. I hope LGCC is the right choice, and I can indeed make it into the Nursing Program. Kudos to you on the impressive GPA that is needed to the competitive Program.
  12. 0
    The short version of this is thst there are benefits to easch route; however, with 30 + years of experience as a nurse and working with nursing students over the past 10 years, i would suggest you consider the following: going the shorter route allows you to determine if it is a good fit for you before additional investment of time and money; going longer raises the possibility that life situations can interrupt your plans. Starting school does not equal finishing school. there are plenty of statistics about drop-out rates and even though everyone wants to believe that they will finish, the reality is that not everyone does. therefore,I would think that the shorter program is the safer strategy and allows you to take a step-wise approach.


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