What's it like working on neurology unit?

  1. 0 Hi everyone, I was just thinking about different specialties. Can you guys give me some information about what it would be like to work on a neurology floor (pediatric neurology would be awesome!)

    What are the pros? Cons? Patient population like? What type of personality do you think would fit? Turnover rate, comparatively?
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  3. Visit  WANT2BANURSESOON profile page

    About WANT2BANURSESOON

    Joined Aug '08; Posts: 488; Likes: 605.

    15 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  ZippyGBR profile page
    0
    neuro med or neuro surgery ? and if surgery heads or spines ?
  5. Visit  XB9S profile page
    0
    Zippy I would class neurology as (Neuro) medicine and surgery as neurosurgery


    Quote from WANT2BANURSESOON
    Hi everyone, I was just thinking about different specialties. Can you guys give me some information about what it would be like to work on a neurology floor (pediatric neurology would be awesome!)

    What are the pros? Cons? Patient population like? What type of personality do you think would fit? Turnover rate, comparatively?

    Neurology is extremely challenging and difficult work and quite often your patients are not going to get better so much of the work can be palliative, degenerative and slow decline. It can range from increasing fits with epilepsy to end stage degenerative conditions. Lots of time is spent with investigations, trials of treatments and hoping for that relapse, but the reward is those patients who do get symptom relief and do get benefits from the treatments that are given and can go home to have some productive and quality time with their families.
  6. Visit  wilsonbl5150 profile page
    2
    I've been a neuro nurse for 3 years. It can be rewarding when you see a patient recover from a trauma or you see a medication start to work and a patients symptoms retreat. It can also be very frustrating and sad. Many neuro diseases have no cure and can leave a patient a shell of their former selves. MS, ALS, Dementia, CVA, TIA are just SOME of challenges you'll face. Personally I love it.
    J19J94R and XB9S like this.
  7. Visit  RNurseV profile page
    0
    I too would like information on what to expect working on a Neuro floor. I just accepted a position on a Neuro PCU floor. Anybody experience on a PCU floor. I am so excited to start working. I have just finished nursing school and this will be my first job.
  8. Visit  pdxmomazon profile page
    0
    RN2B0511-
    I'm curious to see how things are going for you. I start my accelerated RN program in June and I'm looking into specialties...Neuro is interesting to me. Thanks for any sharing :-)
  9. Visit  purplesteth profile page
    0
    I just discovered today that I'll be doing my first placement in Neuro - I have to say I'm pretty excited
  10. Visit  GiantJerk profile page
    0
    I am a new grad about to start on a Neuro floor and every time I tell a veteran nurse where I'm going to work they kind of give me some variation of a foreboding reply like an "Uh oh" or "oh... that's... tough". Has anyone else gotten that reaction?
  11. Visit  RNurseV profile page
    0
    Quote from pdxmomazon
    RN2B0511-
    I'm curious to see how things are going for you. I start my accelerated RN program in June and I'm looking into specialties...Neuro is interesting to me. Thanks for any sharing :-)
    I will come back and let you know. I just do not start working on the floor until the end of June.
  12. Visit  Rob72 profile page
    3
    Quote from GiantJerk
    I am a new grad about to start on a Neuro floor and every time I tell a veteran nurse where I'm going to work they kind of give me some variation of a foreboding reply like an "Uh oh" or "oh... that's... tough". Has anyone else gotten that reaction?
    Interesting. I would guess that that is based on a given population- do/will you have more epileptics, strokes, or...? Neurology is similar to orthotics, in that you tend to have significant levels of depression, new learning, coping issues, altered family roles, etc..

    As my wife has noted (an RT)- Neuro is nuts, Pulm is phlematic, GI is FOS, Ortho is hardheaded... Tends to be fairly true.
    mrsmamabear2002, cateye112, and Nierdo like this.
  13. Visit  Nurse_Diane profile page
    0
    Unpredictable. Frequent neuro checks. Stay on your toes. Many stroke admits can and WILL have repeat CVAs.
  14. Visit  worked hard and long profile page
    0
    Depend on the hospital. A neuro unit in a metro area or university setting will get helicopter fly ins (medivac) from smaller hosp which will give it a more variety of pts you will see and care for. If a community hosp you will see "garden variety" of diagnosis. strokes, seizures, parkinson pt holidays (off meds) occasional injury and fall with surgical intervention if not too complicated. perhaps meningitis, multiple sclerosis rarely guilllian barre. pediatric neuro units are rare. Heck most rural hospital don't even have pediatric ICU. I hope you are in a metro area to fulfill your dreams.
    FYI d/t all these illness not many pts are ambulatory. Most are bedridden and confused some require restraints. some will require the use of specialty beds which can be a great learning experience.
    Last edit by worked hard and long on May 31, '11
  15. Visit  cateye112 profile page
    0
    I am a new RN and just started on the Neuro med-surg unit at my hospital. We have another floor for Neuro (CVA, MS, etc.). We get a lot of post-fall, TIA, observation, AMS etc. Our floor has frequent patient turnover but we are usually pretty full.

    While I love the hospital that I work for and the team that I am surrounded with, I have to say it is crazy busy. I will admit that I have some difficulty delegating tasks as I want to take care of my patients as much as I can. It could stem from nursing school, where we had to do it all...bed baths, vitals, accuchecks...all of it. Or perhaps it stems from my former days as a server or just my need to please. However, I am quickly learning the harsh reality that 12 hours is not as long as you think when you consider all of the work that you need to fit into that time frame. Prioritization and delegation are key.

    As Nurse_Diane said, very unpredictable. We do get a variety. Definitely a lot of neuro checks, post-op/ post-void bladder scans, etc. Certainly not a dull moment.

    I think the most important factor no matter what floor you are on is the team you are working with. Some advice that we got in orientation was to make sure you introduce yourself to everyone. Don't keep yourself in a bubble. You will need the support system.


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