Just got a new grad job in neuro - what to expect? - page 3

by Hands&Feet 19,126 Views | 25 Comments

I was offered and accepted a position on the neuroscience floor. It is at a teaching hospital and is a certified stroke center. I have never set foot through the door, so I don't know what to expect. It's not anything that I... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from MochaNurse
    Hi all,

    Thanks for all the post I am a new grad RN, I just started on a neurosurgical unit in Albert Einstein Hospital in the Bronx on Tuesday and I feel like Im lost..Is that normal? It is alot of work that I pray to master one day soon.....I felt very overwhelmed when the day was done...there is so much to do for each patient and to learn..I feel like Im in school again getting ready to take my unit exam....Please help with any advice, It would be greatly appreciated..I feel like Im all alone? Has anyone else felt this way when they started their first nursing job..Do you guys have any tips that can save my job..My probation is about 3 months and I would love to pass it...I love nursing so I want to do my best!!!..Thanks in advance!!!

    Mocha Nurse
    Hi MochaNurse...

    Every nurse feels like this at first. A Neurosurg unit is challenging for any level of nurse, from novice to expert. But you will learn SO much. I think you will be fine. Just learn as much as you can, ask preceptors and nurse educators available to you for help...remember, they want you to stay on your unit also. If they lose you they are out time and money training you. So ask for help - it is in their best interest that you succeed!
  2. 1
    Quote from DeLanaHarvickWannabe
    Hi MochaNurse...

    Every nurse feels like this at first. A Neurosurg unit is challenging for any level of nurse, from novice to expert. But you will learn SO much. I think you will be fine. Just learn as much as you can, ask preceptors and nurse educators available to you for help...remember, they want you to stay on your unit also. If they lose you they are out time and money training you. So ask for help - it is in their best interest that you succeed!
    Thank You so much for your response DeLanaHarvickWannabe I am very appreciative of your input. I have faith in GOD that I will be just fine. I will definitely take your advice and talk to my Preceptors and Nurse Educators. You are so right about the cost to train me as well as the time. Thanks so much Ill keep you posted as to how it goes from here on, I go back on the floor for 2 days starting tomorrow..I am so anxious and nervous but , I will say a prayer before i go.

    Mocha Nurse..
    DeLanaHarvickWannabe likes this.
  3. 1
    Quote from DeLanaHarvickWannabe
    First of all, congratulations!

    The floor I work on is stroke overflow (stroke floor only has 19 beds) at a teaching hospital that is stroke certified, so we do receive quite a few neuro patients.

    My first MedSurg clinical rotation, though, was on a floor that sounds like yours. (Same hospital - before it expanded and became really specialized - all neuro was lumped onto one floor). Oh my goodness, I learned SO MUCH! I personally think a neuro floor is a great choice for a new nurse, because you will perfect those skills you learned in school. The things you'll learn on that floor will help you in whatever field you enter in the future!

    I'm not going to lie, it will be difficult. I think all new nursing jobs are, but neuro patients can be very stressful and the A & P involved is quite complex. But please do NOT give up...remember no matter what, that your AllNurses family is here for you!

    As for what to study, I did a little research for you. (I am a huge dork who regularly spends $100 at a time on nursing books, even though I've been out of school for four years!)

    These titles sound yummy! (Some are pricey, so shop around...all can be found on Amazon).

    The Clinical Practice of Neurological and Neurosurgical Nursing (Clinical Practice of Neurological & Neurosurgical Nursing) - Joanne V. Hickey, 12/2008

    Care of the Neurological Patient (Essential Clinical Skills for Nurses) - Helen Iggluden, 6/2006

    Clinical Neuroanatomy Made Ridiculously Simple (3rd Edition) - Stephen Goldberg, 1/2007

    Wish you the best!
    Thank you for this post I start as a new grad on the neurology/neurosurgery unit in Jan at Johns Hopkins Hospital I would have never thought about Neuro until I did share time on the unit and learning all the different diagnosis that I could barely pronounce lol. I will do review with the literature you provided...

    My only concern, as a new grad starting out in a specialty does that hinder you if you decide to go to another unit such as cardio?
    DeLanaHarvickWannabe likes this.
  4. 1
    Hickey's book is sort of the "Bible"...but there were errors re: pseudo seizures in the last edition I got (about 8 years ago). It gives good introductory info on a lot of neuro disorders, but for interest in specific diseases, you'll probably want to look for books on those disorders on their own.... it can get pricey, but there is SO much to learn.

    But Hickey is a good intro book
    aNYTrini-n-FLRN likes this.
  5. 0
    Great post all! Thanks!
  6. 0
    I am a new grad RN starting on a Neuro floor in less than a month! I am so nervous. Neuro wasn't necessarily my first choice but I was really just happy to have a job at the hospital of my choice.
    This thread was great to read. I'm getting some ideas of what I need to brush up on and some important tips that will hopefully make orientation easier.

    Thanks everyone! Anymore new grad advice would be appreciated!


Top