New Grad Here- Do I want to work in a Nuero ICU?

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    Of course I am the only one that can answer that question, but I'm looking for advice. I like the primary care feeling of ICUs and I shadowed a nurse in the medical ICU and another nurse in the nuero ICU. I liked both ICU's but felt more of a staff bond and a comfortable feeling in the nuero ICU. I want to learn all my basic nursing skills and have a comfortable nursing foundation in my first job. Will I get this in nuero? Any general advice for how appropriate this would be for a new grad who will probably be interested in trying a new field of nursing (ER, L&D) in 3-4 years? Thanks!
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    I would suggest you try the MICU first, just to get a broader experience.
    Quote from MarySunshine
    Of course I am the only one that can answer that question, but I'm looking for advice. I like the primary care feeling of ICUs and I shadowed a nurse in the medical ICU and another nurse in the nuero ICU. I liked both ICU's but felt more of a staff bond and a comfortable feeling in the nuero ICU. I want to learn all my basic nursing skills and have a comfortable nursing foundation in my first job. Will I get this in nuero? Any general advice for how appropriate this would be for a new grad who will probably be interested in trying a new field of nursing (ER, L&D) in 3-4 years? Thanks!
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    It will come down to where you feel the most comfortable and also which unit will give you the best orientation and preceptorship. This is an individual choice, as well as each hospital has its own weaknesses. Some units have better staffing and administrators/management----so it is hard to give a blanket answer to this. In a Neuro ICU, you will be caring for patients with a multitude of problems, aneurysm clippings, severe head trauma, stroke, etc. You will just have the addition of ventriculostomies and Camino bolts to go along with everything else. So to say that MICU would give you a better training, I do not agree with that............

    If you feel comfortable in this unit, then go for it.............
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    Thanks for your replies! So much to consider.
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    I work in both. I would suggest it if you have been an Lpn or an aide for sometime. You will have organizational skills as well as the ability to talk to patients and family. In neuro there are a lot of young deaths and you need confidence and experience to help you with that. For example, it is sooo difficult to take care of the family of a young mother or father that is brain dead. You have to have excellent time management for assessing your ICP's and Ventrics. You can't be to busy to watch them like a hawk and to do great neuro exams.

    I am one of the biggest advocates for new grads in the ICU. That empowers them from the beggining. If they are ready for it. I am a little concerned about your attention to detail. You spelled neuro wrong throughtout your entire post. You need the ability to notice the slightest detail that may be off. That could be the difference between life and death for your patients. I am not the world's best speller by any means, but you need to know the difference and the trends. My feeling is that you are not quite ready. You need a little more experience. You may be overwhelmed and 2nd guess and doubt yourself if you want to learn all your basic skills in the neuro ICU. I would go to the floor 1st and learn the basics, as well as details.

    Good luck in whatever you choose!
    Quote from MarySunshine
    Of course I am the only one that can answer that question, but I'm looking for advice. I like the primary care feeling of ICUs and I shadowed a nurse in the medical ICU and another nurse in the nuero ICU. I liked both ICU's but felt more of a staff bond and a comfortable feeling in the nuero ICU. I want to learn all my basic nursing skills and have a comfortable nursing foundation in my first job. Will I get this in nuero? Any general advice for how appropriate this would be for a new grad who will probably be interested in trying a new field of nursing (ER, L&D) in 3-4 years? Thanks!
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    I think you should go for it if: you find a unit that is not at all short-staffed, and would have enough veteran nurses available to give you an extensive orientation, and if you are at all interested in Neuro (most nurses hate it). I worked the neurosurgery floor for only 3 months before going into the unit, and found the two experiences to be vastly different. I am still in my orientation, but feel that this is definitely doable and my preceptor agrees that I am doing a great job.

    A lot of my classmates went straight into the ICU after graduation and are also doing well. If you have no interest in the floor, don't make yourself miserable.


    And to the nurse who so kindly pointed out Mary Sunshine's spelling error, I think that you meant "too busy" instead of "to busy." Watch those ventrics.
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    Mary,
    Hi my name is Jessica. I have been a nurse for little over 1 yr now and started in the neuro ICU. I absolutely love it. It's staffed well, which is important because neuro pts can be heavy (Q2 turns, spinal cords). I will admit that I went home exhausted many nights and did a lot of reading. I've learned so much and definately would recommend it if you are an A student, have great organization skills, and quick learner. Good luck!!
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    Quote from 2ndChance
    And to the nurse who so kindly pointed out Mary Sunshine's spelling error, I think that you meant "too busy" instead of "to busy." Watch those ventrics.
    Hahaha. I like that! :chuckle

    Like they say, people who live in glass houses...
  11. 0
    I work in the ICU and worked with neuro pts. at a major trauma hosp.
    I really liked it, but I had a lot of neuro. experience and floor nursing before I went into the ICU.
    I don't encourage to have new grads start fresh in an ICU unless they worked there previously.
    I suggest to start on a floor, then take classes to learn the ICU.
    ICU is a whole different type of nursing that is usually not well taught in schools.
    good luck.
  12. 0
    Quote from heartICU
    And to the nurse who so kindly pointed out Mary Sunshine's spelling error, I think that you meant "too busy" instead of "to busy." Watch those ventrics.
    LOL!!!!!!!!


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