Writing NCLEX after 25 years! Help?

  1. 0
    Hi all. I just found this place and I can't stop reading the posts.

    I graduated as an RN 25 years ago in Canada, worked in England for a year, then came to the US 12 years ago. I work in a state that accepted my Canadian license, but looking toward a move to a state that requires me to NCLEX first. I've already checked with the Board of Nursing in my current state, and failing the NCLEX will not affect my nursing license, so that's sort of comforting.
    What's NOT comforting is writing an exam like this after all of these years. I had an old prof. tell me once that I should never stay in one area of nursing for too long, and I should always continue learning as much as possible. Through out my 4 years of schooling, that was the best advice I received.

    I worked in a small community hospital to start, doing it all. Became a lactation consultant, ET nurse, diabetic nurse, and went to England where I worked in the Emergency room. Came to the US, worked on Neuro trauma ICU for 3 years, then decided it was time to really learn USA nursing and worked 15 different floors on a float pool. After 4 years I left the float pool and worked the Emergency department for a couple of years and now work surgical pre-op and pacu.

    Where to next? All to be decided if I can pass the exam.

    Anyway, while I wait, I downloaded mosby's nclex review to my ipod and answer questions continuously. I have also enrolled into Sylvia Rayfield's review class in Ga. next month. Has anyone taken one of her review classes? Is it recommended? Are the Mosby's review questions sufficient? Is there anything else you would recommend?
    I know this is long, but believe me, I need all the help/advice I can get.
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  3. 11 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I was in almost the same situation as you. I graduated in Argentina 8 years ago. I came to US just for vacation and then decided to stay here. After three years of studying english, I was approved by the board of nursing to take my NCLEX. I took 10 months to study at home and still didn't feel ready to take the exam. Finally, I enrolled in the Kaplan review class in March. It consisted in 6 classes in which they taught us how to read and answer questions. They give you strategies to use only the necessary information from each question. I have to say that it's the best thing I could have done. I passed my test in the first shot and only answered 75 questions. The exam was exactly how Kaplan said it would be. The class cost me $499. I know it sounds expensive, but in my opinion, it is worth it.
  5. 0
    Thank you and congratulations! I just can't imagine having to learn it all in a different language and then write this test! Wow! and Kudos to you!
    I'm taking a review class, 3 full days of review next month, plus studying questions. I'm hoping that experience will account for something, but I'm not totally relying on that alone.
    Once again, thanks, and KUDOS to you!
  6. 0
    Quote from witc
    I was in almost the same situation as you. I graduated in Argentina 8 years ago. I came to US just for vacation and then decided to stay here. After three years of studying english, I was approved by the board of nursing to take my NCLEX. I took 10 months to study at home and still didn't feel ready to take the exam. Finally, I enrolled in the Kaplan review class in March. It consisted in 6 classes in which they taught us how to read and answer questions. They give you strategies to use only the necessary information from each question. I have to say that it's the best thing I could have done. I passed my test in the first shot and only answered 75 questions. The exam was exactly how Kaplan said it would be. The class cost me $499. I know it sounds expensive, but in my opinion, it is worth it.
    Congrates on passing this exam. wahooooooo. so you believe kaplan is best. Tell more about the course . how many hrs you was studying and efforts u put. did you continuously study for 10 months?
  7. 0
    Quote from EEBRN
    Hi all. I just found this place and I can't stop reading the posts.

    I graduated as an RN 25 years ago in Canada, worked in England for a year, then came to the US 12 years ago. I work in a state that accepted my Canadian license, but looking toward a move to a state that requires me to NCLEX first. I've already checked with the Board of Nursing in my current state, and failing the NCLEX will not affect my nursing license, so that's sort of comforting.
    What's NOT comforting is writing an exam like this after all of these years. I had an old prof. tell me once that I should never stay in one area of nursing for too long, and I should always continue learning as much as possible. Through out my 4 years of schooling, that was the best advice I received.

    I worked in a small community hospital to start, doing it all. Became a lactation consultant, ET nurse, diabetic nurse, and went to England where I worked in the Emergency room. Came to the US, worked on Neuro trauma ICU for 3 years, then decided it was time to really learn USA nursing and worked 15 different floors on a float pool. After 4 years I left the float pool and worked the Emergency department for a couple of years and now work surgical pre-op and pacu.

    Where to next? All to be decided if I can pass the exam.

    Anyway, while I wait, I downloaded mosby's nclex review to my ipod and answer questions continuously. I have also enrolled into Sylvia Rayfield's review class in Ga. next month. Has anyone taken one of her review classes? Is it recommended? Are the Mosby's review questions sufficient? Is there anything else you would recommend?
    I know this is long, but believe me, I need all the help/advice I can get.
    It would be easier for you. Which state of us doesn't require nclex? People say suanders is good too for nclex. keep in touch. this is really very good web site for nurses.
  8. 0
    Quote from Gold2010
    Congrates on passing this exam. wahooooooo. so you believe kaplan is best. Tell more about the course . how many hrs you was studying and efforts u put. did you continuously study for 10 months?
    Thank you!
    Honestly, studying at home was not very good, for I would always find something else to do instead of studying. Usually, I would study 1 or 2 hours per day, but as I said before, I didn't stick to my own schedule. I bought a Sanders Nclex made increadibly easy book 2004 version. I tried separating topics because it had a lot of information which made my studying worse because you can't just learn everything.
    I believe Kaplan is the best option because it narrows down each topic. For example, the book has a section for meds with the most important things you need to know without confusing you with dosages (which btw, NCLEX doesn't ask, with a few exceptions, such as digoxin or lithium). Kaplan also teaches you to read the question to eliminate information you don't need and also fin 'clues' to direct you to the answer.
  9. 0
    You say you signed up for a review class. Good idea to get yourself started. Then it is study, study, study your review resources. Do as many questions as possible and study the rationales. That is the standard advice for everyone. Good luck.
  10. 0
    I graduated in the US but waited 11 years to take my boards. I also used Kaplan (did their online program for just over $400) and passed my first attempt with 75 questions.

    Provided you can remember that the NCLEX focuses on how things would be in a perfect world rather than the real world, I think you'll be fine.

    I'm not familiar with Sylvia Rayfield's course but a search on this site might provide some useful reviews. Mosby is generally considered a good source but more people use Saunder's and Kaplan for study materials. I'd also suggest LaCharity's Priority and Delegation book as many people (myself included) had a lot of that on their exam.
  11. 0
    Definitely practice questions and read the rationale but also remember NCLEX is aimed at new grads so forget your experience whilst you sit the exam
  12. 0
    Thanks for many replies, I feel from many of the replies, I on the right track! After working in the USA for almost 12 years now, I become accustomed to the many meds, and while answering questions, I just attempting to answer as if I'm a new grad. Initially I was attempting to read way to much into the question, which isn't a good thing. I'm really having to learn to read the question from a different perspective. The delegation and priorizing seems to come natural (after many years as a charge nurse), but like I said, experience can also be harmful. Sooooo, back to thinking like a new grad. That seems to help.


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