Taking NCLEX this Thursday (2/12)

  1. 1
    Wow that is only 4 days!! EEkkk! It really snuck up on me and I am starting to worry that I didn't study as much as I could have. I have done in the area of 3,500 review questions, and my scores have been all over the place. I have to admit that I don't take doing questions when I am studying as seriously as I do when I am actually testing...that fact right there leads me to worry a bit. I did make sure that I took the time to read and understand all the rationales, as well as reading over any content area that came up that I just didn't feel very comfortable with.

    I did really well in school, I finished with one of the top GPA's. And I did really well on my ATI predictor. One would think that this would really be a confidence booster, but it made me feel like I couldn't take the need for studying for granted. This is the MOST stressed out I can ever remember feeling, I am seriously starting to make myself sick over taking this test. I thought about rescheduling, but changed my mind as it would only be prolonging the inevitable. Now I am having insomnia, GI distress, crying spells, and just a general feeling of anxiety. I am already working as a GN, and so far I LOVE my job it couldn't be more perfect for me and I don't want to lose that. I guess that only adds to my stress. To make matters even more stressful, I have to go to new grad class the day before my exam and have to work the day after (I guess that may help keep my mind off of the situation). Everyone that knows me keeps telling me I will be fine, one of my instructors from my last semester of school even told me she has no doubt that I will be one of the ones that is done with 75 Q's. But I can't help but worrying, what if I don't make it. I guess I tend to worry too much about the possibility of failure. I wish there were some magic way of just knowing when you are ready to take the NCLEX, but since there isn't I am just going to suck it up and get it done. All that said, please any words of wisdom to help me get over my freak out would be more than welcomed. Also, please send positive vibes my way and send out a prayer or 2 or 3 on my behalf (Lord knows I have been praying everyday). One last thing Good luck and best wishes to everyone else testing soon...my thoughts and prayers are with you!!!lsebeg:
    Foreverplaid1 likes this.
  2. 4,834 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 30 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Good luck.
    Chantilly likes this.
  5. 1
    Good luck and don't study the day before
    Chantilly likes this.
  6. 15
    Try these steps. They helped me a lot:

    “Ivory Tower Nursing” - Do not compare to the real world. Do everything by the textbook. You have time for all of your patients!
    “Don’t Pass The Buck” - Do not pass the task to anyone else. It’s the RN’s task. Relaying the task to a physician is 99% wrong. Unless the RN has done everything he/she can do, they can “notify the physician.” Passing the buck also includes PT and OT.
    Always think about the SAFETY of your patient in the back of your mind. Ask yourself “Is this action safe for my patient?
    Always communicate verbally first, then in writing/documenting. Verbal communication allows others to clarify with questions up front.
    Always choose the answers that are the most complete. Ex: Tasks completed and uncompleted that need to be done.
    Priority Strategy
    “Who are you going to see first?”
    Select the most acute or less/least stable out of the four.
    “Can I delegate this task to an LPN, CNA?”
    “Is the patient acute or unstable?”
    “Who has a serious problem?”
    Select a patient that is developing complications from their condition. Ex: Pt with HTN that complains of pain between the shoulder blades. Prolonging assessment may develop into an MI or angina.
    When there is no acute or unstable patient or no one is developing complications, you need to pick a patient you need to perform RN duties on (cannot delegate).
    Assessment
    Teaching (Includes psychosocial support)!
    Evaluation (nursing judgement)
    FYI: TRIAGE - Trauma
    Respiratory
    Intracranial pressure
    An infection
    GI problems
    Elimination
    Floating Assignment: Float RN’s will get the LPN type assignments because he/she is unfamiliar with unit specifics. Ex: Med-Surg RN floats to PEDS/OB unit.
    Assessment vs. Implementation Strategy
    When a mix of assessment and implementation are in the answer choices, the first step is always assessment (like the nursing process). Exception: In cases of emergency, you must implement first!
    If all answers are implementation, choose the answer that is the most desired outcome for the patient.
    Early vs Late Sign - Look for the earliest sign of a complication. Assessment of local findings is more important than systemic findings.
    Subjective vs Objective Strategy - Always go with objective findings because they are more reliable! Ex: Monitoring, lab results.
    Take care of the patient first, then equipment, and then paperwork. Stop the cause, then treat the problem.
    If everything is normal, just document!
    Positioning Strategy - Know different types of ROM and assistive devices. First decide what you are trying to prevent or promote.
    Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Strategy - Used when physical and psychosocial choices are present in the question.
    Psychosocial answers are eliminated first! Pain is considered a psychosocial aspect.
    One choice will not make any sense. It has nothing to do with the question.
    If you see any of the five basic physical needs, it is usually correct.
    Nutrition
    Fluid
    Oxygen
    Elimination
    Rest/Sleep
    Exception: In pain being psychosocial, Do Not Discard in:
    Spinal cord injuries
    Sickle Cell Anemia/Crises
    Kidney Stones
    You must respond ASAP!!!!!
    ABC Strategy - Whenever a questions deals with Airway, Breathing, or Circulation, it is the most important answer. Exception: ABCs do not apply to spinal cord injury! (Think autonomic dysreflexia).
    Supervision Strategy
    Always stay with the patient. Patient under supervision is always a good idea. Find an appropriate outlet for the patient’s energy.
    Dietary Strategy - “What is the appropriate diet for my patient?”
    Decide what nutrient you need to deal with in the question.
    Give it a (+) or (-).
    “Most Concerned” Strategy
    This applies when there is “most concerned” in the question.
    3 out of the 4 will be expected findings. 1 will have a complication.
    Anytime an RN has to respond or intervene, it is a teaching question.
    Give the patient/LPN/CNA concrete, specific answers.
    Avoid vague, nonspecific terms. Ex: anytime, when comfortable, sometimes
    “At Risk” Questions
    Choose the one that CANNOT be modified
    Modified Ex: diet, smoking cessation, quit job
    Cannot Modify Ex: heredity, race
    Therapeutic Communication Strategy
    Open-Ended Questions
    Reflection
    Clarification
    Silence
    If you have two therapeutic communication choices, chooses silence (always best)
    Never leave the patient alone (includes family members).

    Non Therapeutic Communication
    Shifting The Focus - Relating “I” or someone you know is always wrong.
    False Reassurance
    Word “should” should never be present as your correct answer.
    Dismissive - avoiding the discussion
    “Why”-ended questions - the patient may get defensive
    Closed-ended questions
    Exception: Reflection is the only type of communication to use in psychotic patients. Do not use any other type - you will feed into the patient’s psychotic experience. Instead, reorient the patient to reality!
    Comma, comma Strategy - When you have several statement in the answer choice,make sure all components of the answer are correct/all fit together. When one part is wrong, the whole answer is wrong.
    Here and Now Strategy - Don’t postpone any tasks or patient needs/care.
    Know labs and expected outcomes. Ex: Hyper- and Hypo-
    FYI: BUN, think hot dogs (end by product of metabolism)
    Increase in BUN=dehydration, renal failure, GI bleed
    Use associations to remember values. Ex: BUN- 8-25 y/o eat hot dogs.
    You always have a physician’s order. Ex: RN can stop med or inflate/deflate cuff
    Know pharmacology - indications, expected side effects, adverse effects, contraindications.
    Ask yourself. “What signs do I look for?” & “What should I teach my patients about the drug?”
    Use acronyms for certain drug families (Ex: benzodiazepines)
    LEAVES
    L-Librium
    E-Equanil
    A-Ativan
    V-Valium
    E-Equanil
    S-Serax
    Mc2182, scarcity21, discojul, and 12 others like this.
  7. 1
    Quote from ehatchett71
    Try these steps. They helped me a lot:

    “Ivory Tower Nursing” - Do not compare to the real world. Do everything by the textbook. You have time for all of your patients!
    “Don’t Pass The Buck” - Do not pass the task to anyone else. It’s the RN’s task. Relaying the task to a physician is 99% wrong. Unless the RN has done everything he/she can do, they can “notify the physician.” Passing the buck also includes PT and OT.
    Always think about the SAFETY of your patient in the back of your mind. Ask yourself “Is this action safe for my patient?
    Always communicate verbally first, then in writing/documenting. Verbal communication allows others to clarify with questions up front.
    Always choose the answers that are the most complete. Ex: Tasks completed and uncompleted that need to be done.
    Priority Strategy
    “Who are you going to see first?”
    Select the most acute or less/least stable out of the four.
    “Can I delegate this task to an LPN, CNA?”
    “Is the patient acute or unstable?”
    “Who has a serious problem?”
    Select a patient that is developing complications from their condition. Ex: Pt with HTN that complains of pain between the shoulder blades. Prolonging assessment may develop into an MI or angina.
    When there is no acute or unstable patient or no one is developing complications, you need to pick a patient you need to perform RN duties on (cannot delegate).
    Assessment
    Teaching (Includes psychosocial support)!
    Evaluation (nursing judgement)
    FYI: TRIAGE - Trauma
    Respiratory
    Intracranial pressure
    An infection
    GI problems
    Elimination
    Floating Assignment: Float RN’s will get the LPN type assignments because he/she is unfamiliar with unit specifics. Ex: Med-Surg RN floats to PEDS/OB unit.
    Assessment vs. Implementation Strategy
    When a mix of assessment and implementation are in the answer choices, the first step is always assessment (like the nursing process). Exception: In cases of emergency, you must implement first!
    If all answers are implementation, choose the answer that is the most desired outcome for the patient.
    Early vs Late Sign - Look for the earliest sign of a complication. Assessment of local findings is more important than systemic findings.
    Subjective vs Objective Strategy - Always go with objective findings because they are more reliable! Ex: Monitoring, lab results.
    Take care of the patient first, then equipment, and then paperwork. Stop the cause, then treat the problem.
    If everything is normal, just document!
    Positioning Strategy - Know different types of ROM and assistive devices. First decide what you are trying to prevent or promote.
    Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Strategy - Used when physical and psychosocial choices are present in the question.
    Psychosocial answers are eliminated first! Pain is considered a psychosocial aspect.
    One choice will not make any sense. It has nothing to do with the question.
    If you see any of the five basic physical needs, it is usually correct.
    Nutrition
    Fluid
    Oxygen
    Elimination
    Rest/Sleep
    Exception: In pain being psychosocial, Do Not Discard in:
    Spinal cord injuries
    Sickle Cell Anemia/Crises
    Kidney Stones
    You must respond ASAP!!!!!
    ABC Strategy - Whenever a questions deals with Airway, Breathing, or Circulation, it is the most important answer. Exception: ABCs do not apply to spinal cord injury! (Think autonomic dysreflexia).
    Supervision Strategy
    Always stay with the patient. Patient under supervision is always a good idea. Find an appropriate outlet for the patient’s energy.
    Dietary Strategy - “What is the appropriate diet for my patient?”
    Decide what nutrient you need to deal with in the question.
    Give it a (+) or (-).
    “Most Concerned” Strategy
    This applies when there is “most concerned” in the question.
    3 out of the 4 will be expected findings. 1 will have a complication.
    Anytime an RN has to respond or intervene, it is a teaching question.
    Give the patient/LPN/CNA concrete, specific answers.
    Avoid vague, nonspecific terms. Ex: anytime, when comfortable, sometimes
    “At Risk” Questions
    Choose the one that CANNOT be modified
    Modified Ex: diet, smoking cessation, quit job
    Cannot Modify Ex: heredity, race
    Therapeutic Communication Strategy
    Open-Ended Questions
    Reflection
    Clarification
    Silence
    If you have two therapeutic communication choices, chooses silence (always best)
    Never leave the patient alone (includes family members).

    Non Therapeutic Communication
    Shifting The Focus - Relating “I” or someone you know is always wrong.
    False Reassurance
    Word “should” should never be present as your correct answer.
    Dismissive - avoiding the discussion
    “Why”-ended questions - the patient may get defensive
    Closed-ended questions
    Exception: Reflection is the only type of communication to use in psychotic patients. Do not use any other type - you will feed into the patient’s psychotic experience. Instead, reorient the patient to reality!
    Comma, comma Strategy - When you have several statement in the answer choice,make sure all components of the answer are correct/all fit together. When one part is wrong, the whole answer is wrong.
    Here and Now Strategy - Don’t postpone any tasks or patient needs/care.
    Know labs and expected outcomes. Ex: Hyper- and Hypo-
    FYI: BUN, think hot dogs (end by product of metabolism)
    Increase in BUN=dehydration, renal failure, GI bleed
    Use associations to remember values. Ex: BUN- 8-25 y/o eat hot dogs.
    You always have a physician’s order. Ex: RN can stop med or inflate/deflate cuff
    Know pharmacology - indications, expected side effects, adverse effects, contraindications.
    Ask yourself. “What signs do I look for?” & “What should I teach my patients about the drug?”
    Use acronyms for certain drug families (Ex: benzodiazepines)
    LEAVES
    L-Librium
    E-Equanil
    A-Ativan
    V-Valium
    E-Equanil
    S-Serax
    Wow thanks for the good info. Some of was stuff that I hadn't really thought, hopefully it will help me out!
    Foreverplaid1 likes this.
  8. 1
    Good luck.
    Chantilly likes this.
  9. 1
    Good luck !!! And let us know how it goes???
    Chantilly likes this.
  10. 1
    good luck...
    Chantilly likes this.
  11. 0
    Well...3 hours and 75 questions later (yes it really took me 3 hours to do 75 questions) I am done. How do I feel you may be wondering...I don't know how I feel. I don't feel bad about it, but I don't feel great about it either. There were things there that I knew and there were things that I took a shot in the dark at..but that is kind of what I had expected. I think I got like 15 SATA's...which some say it's a good thing to be getting them because it means you are answering higher level questions. I don't know...I just don't know. I have decided to try to stay positive and find things to pass my time so that I am not sitting and stewing on whether or not I passed (don't get me wrong I it will still be on my mind, I just don't want to let thinking about it consume me). So now the hardest part begins...waiting to see the verdict. Have my fingers crossed that it worked out, and if not I now know where I went wrong.
  12. 0
    I took my exam this morning and my exam ended at 75. I was pretty okay walking out, But now I don't know how I feel. One minute I think I passed the next minute I am horrified by the idea of failing and doing this all over again. There were some questions that I knew and some that just seemed to keep coming back. Had a lot of Priority, SATA, Psych and Meds. I feel like some of my questions were lower level, but I don't know. It sucks waiting!


Top