Priority questions' level of difficulty is the passing mark!? - page 2

Everyone who took NCLEX, passed or not, has in some point of their exams encountered many priority questions. I am thinking that priority questions' level of difficulty is the passing mark. If... Read More

  1. by   sunny2006
    Quote from LenaRN06
    Eric and RNsRWe are right. There was a thread here awhile ago that someone got 265 questions and had lots of priority BUT THEY STILL FAILED. Any priority question can be an easy or a hard question. Depends how you look at it I guess. But the NCLEX is just a big mystery....
    I haven't read the rest of this thread, but in response to this one I am quoting, I got up to 245, and most of my ?'s were priority and delegation. I had no math, no meds, no labs, and a few infection control. That's it. Mostly all priority and deleg.

    I failed. My test print out from the BON said I came "near passing with all levels" ...Go figure. Hopefeully I'll have better luck retesting next week.
  2. by   RGN1
    You can kill yourself in the exam trying to out guess the machine!

    When I got my first priority question on my test I almost stood up & cheered because I'd heard they were on the harder line.

    I nearly forgot to breath when trying to answer the 1st infection control one!

    Then suddenly it dropped to an easier med question & I got that horrible sinking sensation, you know where it feels like all the blood is draining from your face. I tohught I must have answered the precious prioty/infection control questions wrong. Then it bounced straight up to a "who would you call first" that was REALLY hard (I guess now that the easier question was a test one.) After that I decided to forget the type of question being asked & stopped trying to guess where I was. I just answered each one that came along to the best of my ability. Luckily that was enough because I passed.

    A hard priority question for you might be an easy one for the majority, you just don't know. So don't try & second guess the exam, take each question as it comes & try your very best to get it correct!
  3. by   FutureUSRN
    Just curious, have you got TRIAGE in your "failed" exam?
  4. by   FutureUSRN
    Actually, I am not trying to second guess the exam and I am not convincing everyone here to do that during the actual exam. The important thing here is that we should be able to understand how the machine works and at what level of difficulty a priority question might be.

    Knowing this would help us prepare for the exam. For example if we know that priority questions are at difficulty level near the passing mark, then during our review, we must be able to achieve atleast 65% correct on all practice priority questions before we sit for NCLEX. That way, we know if we are ready or not and not just putting our $200 down the drain.
  5. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from FutureUSRN
    Actually, I am not trying to second guess the exam and I am not convincing everyone here to do that during the actual exam. The important thing here is that we should be able to understand how the machine works and at what level of difficulty a priority question might be.

    Knowing this would help us prepare for the exam. For example if we know that priority questions are at difficulty level near the passing mark, then during our review, we must be able to achieve atleast 65% correct on all practice priority questions before we sit for NCLEX. That way, we know if we are ready or not and not just putting our $200 down the drain.
    I understand your desire to know this, really I do. The reasons you gave make perfect sense. HOWEVER, what we have been trying to tell you is that there is no "type" of question that really gives you a great indication of whether you are failing, near passing, slightly above passing, way above passing. You CANNOT tell. The overall thinking (and mine, too, up until recently) was that priority, delegation, infection control were higher level questions.

    Reality kicked in. People reported that they had LOTS and LOTS of those questions--and yet failed. Obviously, the harder ones they got wrong, the easier ones (right or wrongly answered) were below the level of passing.

    Triage questions, as you keep asking, are priority questions (what is your priority in this situation). Don't get hung up on symantics. Priority questions can be rather easy and will NOT PASS YOU no matter how many "below standard" ones you get.

    I see you have many threads and questions on this subject; my best suggestion would be to read through them, read the facts from the Board itself, and then you'll know where your thinking is correct and where it's faulty.

    Best of luck to you.
  6. by   FutureUSRN
    You are not getting my point. Understanding how the system works is not to determine the results of the exam but to help us prepare for the exam. Two different things. You might be thinking that we will be using this to predict the results of the exam after taking it. No! I want to understand this to help me better prepare for the exam.

    As so many here have told, they got many priority questions so it means we need to get prepared for these priority questions. I know that TRIAGE is a priority question; but what level of priority question? easy? difficult? or maybe both?

    Why we were not given a lot of pharma questions rather then priority questions? Is there a reason?

    I am not trying to convince everyone here. If somebody here can say that he got a lot of pharma questions than priority questions; then I will rest my case.
  7. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from FutureUSRN
    You are not getting my point. Understanding how the system works is not to determine the results of the exam but to help us prepare for the exam. Two different things. You might be thinking that we will be using this to predict the results of the exam after taking it. No! I want to understand this to help me better prepare for the exam. As so many here have told, they got many priority questions so it means we need to get prepared for these priority questions.
    Ok...well, yes, you have to know how to do prioritization correctly in order to pass this exam. You will need to practice many of them, of course, in order to do them well.

    I know that TRIAGE is a priority question; but what level of priority question? easy? difficult? or maybe both?
    It is now you who are missing the point. As I have said a number of times now (with support of others), it is NOT that you can determine how difficult a question is by the TYPE. For instance, you can have a triage question that taxes your brain, has alot of components, and people with very similar severity, such that you have to really work at the correct answer. A difficult question. Or, you can have a triage question that places two of the four people in no danger at all, one person has a UTI, and the last person is bleeding out from a cut artery. Get it? Easy.

    Why we were not given a lot of pharma questions rather then priority questions? Is there a reason?
    Who was not given alot of pharm questions? Everyone has a different mix. I've seen people get one or two med questions in 75 questions, others get 12. Both passed. I've seen people get not many in the whole 265, and others get alot. Both failed. Do you see where I'm going here? A pharm question is just that: a question. Could be easy to answer or hard.

    I am not trying to convince everyone here. If somebody here can say that he got a lot of pharma questions than priority questions; then I will rest my case.
    LOL! Ok, resting your case or not, yes, *I* got alot of pharm questions, some that I found ridiculously hard. Meds I hadn't been familiar with used in unusual (to me) ways. Were they scored? Were they pilots? NO ONE knows, but I still passed pretty easily

    If you still wish to chip away at this, you certainly may, but I hope by now you see the point you SHOULD be getting is that you need to be able to apply the knowledge you learned in school. That's IT. The test determines your judgment in nursing situations. It does so to a minimum standard, not a maximum. Everyone passes a minimum standard; about 85% the first time, anyway.
  8. by   suzy253
    Quote from RNsRWe
    Ok...well, yes, you have to know how to do prioritization correctly in order to pass this exam. You will need to practice many of them, of course, in order to do them well.



    It is now you who are missing the point. As I have said a number of times now (with support of others), it is NOT that you can determine how difficult a question is by the TYPE. For instance, you can have a triage question that taxes your brain, has alot of components, and people with very similar severity, such that you have to really work at the correct answer. A difficult question. Or, you can have a triage question that places two of the four people in no danger at all, one person has a UTI, and the last person is bleeding out from a cut artery. Get it? Easy.



    Who was not given alot of pharm questions? Everyone has a different mix. I've seen people get one or two med questions in 75 questions, others get 12. Both passed. I've seen people get not many in the whole 265, and others get alot. Both failed. Do you see where I'm going here? A pharm question is just that: a question. Could be easy to answer or hard.



    LOL! Ok, resting your case or not, yes, *I* got alot of pharm questions, some that I found ridiculously hard. Meds I hadn't been familiar with used in unusual (to me) ways. Were they scored? Were they pilots? NO ONE knows, but I still passed pretty easily

    If you still wish to chip away at this, you certainly may, but I hope by now you see the point you SHOULD be getting is that you need to be able to apply the knowledge you learned in school. That's IT. The test determines your judgment in nursing situations. It does so to a minimum standard, not a maximum. Everyone passes a minimum standard; about 85% the first time, anyway.
    AMEN!!!!
  9. by   FutureUSRN
    Oh I want you to say verbatim that you got MORE PHARMA QUESTIONS THAN PRIORITY QUESTIONS...I am not asking that you got a lot of pharma but you have to compare that with priority questions....
  10. by   RNsRWe
    You think I COUNTED? LOL....

    Ok, I give up. You don't understand what anyone is saying, so we must be all wrong.

    There's no more point of discussion.

    Best of luck to you.
  11. by   RGN1
    Whichever way you look, whatever way you study, bottom line is that you need to know your content & you need to know how to prioritise safely & effectively.

    Go thorough as many questions as you can then try out the Mosby CAT test on-line & see what it predicts. I would personally recommend Kaplan - preferably the live course - because that is where you can learn those all important prioritising skills. That way when you do your exam you can make sure you're answering questions at a level high enough for you to pass.
  12. by   FutureUSRN
    I am saying here is that almost everybody I know or I heard of say they got a lot of priority questions than any other type of questions. The passing mark's difficulty must have been at that type of question, using logic if we know how to use it. Now, if you say verbatim that you got a lot of pharm questions than priority question, I will rest my case.
  13. by   FutureUSRN
    not because more people say this and that make them correct....the bible say "a lot of people will perish....few will be saved..."

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