How many questions?

  1. How many practice questions should be answered before sitting for the exam. I know people who have done 2500 and passed 4000 who failed..
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   Piscean
    I was told to do around 5000 questions. I did around 3000 and passed on the first try. It's up to each individual. I would judge on how many questions to answer on how I was doing on the practice test. Best of luck.
  4. by   tinta06
    Quote from PractikalNurse
    How many practice questions should be answered before sitting for the exam. I know people who have done 2500 and passed 4000 who failed..
    It depends on the type of book/CD you are using. If it is Saunders 3000 to 5000 is ideal if you have enough time. The first time I used Kaplan (class, five days, $400, helpful if you know all nursing content areas) and with few Saunders questions. This time around, I used Saunders mostly (3000 + questions) and NCSBN (1150 questions, excellent delegation,prioritizing, safety, pharmacology notes/questions rational). I bought the $45 3 weeks access from NCSBN after Saunders 3rd Edition to assess my weak areas and brush myself up more. Loved them both.
    Good luck.
  5. by   Heather, R.N.
    I used Saunders mostly and did around 2000 questions (I passed on my first try). I focused more on keeping a percentage that was acceptable to me in all areas. I set my bar high- 85%- which I think is just as important, if not more important, than answering a certain number of questions. If you do 5000 questions and are averaging 60% correct, that's probably not good enough... I think doing it this way helped me a ton. GOOD LUCK!
  6. by   EricJRN
    I think Heather has the right idea with looking more at how well you're doing. The number of questions or amount of study time needed is going to vary widely from people to person. Some people don't even keep track of the number of practice questions they've answered. You know what they say... There are three kinds of people in the world - those who can count and those who can't.
  7. by   JenNJFLCA
    I think did about 4000 questions that consisted of Kaplan, Saunders, Mosby, and Lippincott (some). I focused more on my progress. I wasn't doing too well at first, so I just kept doing question after question. I made sure I read all the rationales and understood why I got each question right/wrong. I also found that I did better when I did questions every day, even if it was only 25 after a 12 hour shift. I think the key is to find what works for you. Good luck!!
  8. by   soulsearcher
    i cannot believe it. i finally passed the nclex! i took it 2x! i am so excited and relieved, i am sending out positive vibes for all who are still awaiting results. i have experienced a whole lot of anxiety along with this exam and my thoughts are going out to everyone who is in this too! you all can do it! thanks to everyone involved in the conversations, reading people's friendly comments really helped me to stay positive and calm. :redpinkhe peace :wink2: love and hope :flowersfo
  9. by   gradgitated
    I think that if you don't have a secure knowledge base (particularly in V/S, labs, pharmacology, Rules of Management, therapeutic communication, and triage) AND have a clear understanding of how to take questions apart/rephrase them, even 5,000 practice questions won't help much. If you take the time to really analyze the questions you will be able choose the answer that they are looking for. Before I read the Kaplan NCLEX-RN book I scored a 117 out of 180 on the practice test. After I read the book and learned how to take apart/rephrase the questions I scored 153 out of 180. My point is that, in my own experience, simply remebering facts did NOT help my performance....learning how to analyze and interpret the questions did.
  10. by   charmedpn
    I agree with you totally gradgiated. Tearing apart the question is what I had to learn. As well as remember the ABC's (airway, b reathing and circulation) and maslow's hierachy of needs basic needs need to be met first. That is how i learned as well as aswering bunches of questions.
  11. by   PractikalNurse2B
    Well i agree with both Eric and Heather. I havnt really kept count on how many ive done so far the most important thing is the percentile ... :wink2:
  12. by   RNKay31
    You do not want to know, the first time I did about 5000 and I fail because of anxiety, I got 265, the second and final time I did over 7000 questions and I PASS with 75, Thank God.
  13. by   RebeccaJeanRN
    I really think its not the number of questions, but the attainment of knowledge and comfort with answering them. In other words, if after 3000 you are still getting most wrong, then you need more study. Due to what I've read on this website, I recommend Saunders. I also recommend not trying to cram in a zillion questions all at once. Pace yourself with maybe 100-150 a day, taking a day off every week from looking at it. Also, test yourself at the time of day you are most alert- unless you have no choice about when you can practice- or it can be frustrating and you won't absorb as much of the rationale. Good luck!
  14. by   PractikalNurse2B
    Quote from RebeccaJeanRN
    I really think its not the number of questions, but the attainment of knowledge and comfort with answering them. In other words, if after 3000 you are still getting most wrong, then you need more study. Due to what I've read on this website, I recommend Saunders. I also recommend not trying to cram in a zillion questions all at once. Pace yourself with maybe 100-150 a day, taking a day off every week from looking at it. Also, test yourself at the time of day you are most alert- unless you have no choice about when you can practice- or it can be frustrating and you won't absorb as much of the rationale. Good luck!
    thats true.. i try to study during the time that im mostly wide awake. its also kind of difficult for me b/c i have a 3 month old daughter. luckily for me, shes not a fussy baby and she sleeps all day.

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