Fourth attempt, failed! But still thankful!

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    Still thankful because I got all NEAR PASSING and one above PASSING on the report. Atleast I know where I stand after being out of school for at least 6 years. Although I took a remedial course a year ago but that was because my state required it.

    I used Exam Cram, PDA and NCSBN. I think all I need to do is to have that extra push over the line to pass! Do more questions and a little bit of content on the side I guess. What do you guys suggest I should do? Should I concentrate on questions or review content all over again?? Open to all comments, suggestions and the critics.

    For those of you who are taking the exam for the 4th or 5th time, don't get discouraged and see where you really need to focus on instead of worrying so much.

    stay positive !!!

    By the way, I had 31 SATA. no calculations, 2 meds, 4 dragNdrop.. 4 hours and 205 questions.
    Last edit by mzmae on Feb 27, '13
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    By the way, I had 31 SATA. no calculations, 2 meds, 4 dragNdrop.. 4 hours and 205qs
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    I haven't registered for my 2nd attempt to take it. Because I know im not yet ready I just enrolled myself on feuer live review class this comming april. after that, thats the only time im gona make my schedule hopefully by this time im gona pass it...
    I dont wana rush over this time, I'm gona take my time studying

    and yeah stay possitive
  7. 1
    Both, I'd say.
    When you do questions, you're reviewing content. I mean - you should be or what's the point of doing a butt-load of quizzes? I've read people on here say, 'Oh, I do 500-1000 questions a week'.

    Yeah...but are you LEARNING? Are you retaining anything? Do you understand the material?
    How does one review and plug those knowledge gaps and understand the material when study-time revolves around the constant answering of questions?

    I, personally, never got much from doing bazillions of questions. Overkill and a waste of time.
    I'd do maybe 30 questions and a focused review on my wrong answers or even correct answers that I merely guessed correctly.
    I checked the rationale for the correct answer. Then, I'd crack my textbook and ATI manual (med surg, pharm, fundamentals, etc...) and read up on it. I would usually read the entire chapter.

    Sometimes, I'd make a little research project out of it. Do a PP presentation. I'm very much a hands-on type learner. If I perform the activity once? I learn it. I recently had to discuss the importance/point of administering Lovenox to one of our post-op residents (femur fx) to one of our GVNs...and was surprised (as I spoke) by my recall. I literally started rattling off about blood clots off the top of my head.

    My suggestions?
    - Focus on what you don't know.
    - Know content. It's the only way to do well on SATA questions, for instance. SATAs are straight-forward. There is no special 'trick' or 'tip' to getting the correct answer. You either know the material or you don't.

    I passed boards on the first try in under and 1:30 minutes with 85 questions. (I'm an LVN). I prepared with nothing but the ATI program and my school textbooks. I'm against using multiple sources.

    Good luck.
    smiley15 likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from MedChica
    Both, I'd say.
    When you do questions, you're reviewing content. I mean - you should be or what's the point of doing a butt-load of quizzes? I've read people on here say, 'Oh, I do 500-1000 questions a week'.

    Yeah...but are you LEARNING? Are you retaining anything? Do you understand the material?
    How does one review and plug those knowledge gaps and understand the material when study-time revolves around the constant answering of questions?

    I, personally, never got much from doing bazillions of questions. Overkill and a waste of time.
    I'd do maybe 30 questions and a focused review on my wrong answers or even correct answers that I merely guessed correctly.
    I checked the rationale for the correct answer. Then, I'd crack my textbook and ATI manual (med surg, pharm, fundamentals, etc...) and read up on it. I would usually read the entire chapter.

    Sometimes, I'd make a little research project out of it. Do a PP presentation. I'm very much a hands-on type learner. If I perform the activity once? I learn it. I recently had to discuss the importance/point of administering Lovenox to one of our post-op residents (femur fx) to one of our GVNs...and was surprised (as I spoke) by my recall. I literally started rattling off about blood clots off the top of my head.

    My suggestions?
    - Focus on what you don't know.
    - Know content. It's the only way to do well on SATA questions, for instance. SATAs are straight-forward. There is no special 'trick' or 'tip' to getting the correct answer. You either know the material or you don't.

    I passed boards on the first try in under and 1:30 minutes with 85 questions. (I'm an LVN). I prepared with nothing but the ATI program and my school textbooks. I'm against using multiple sources.

    Good luck.
    True.
  9. 0
    How about you try kaplan?
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    passed my PN 1.5 hrs in 85Q's first try!.. what i did is almost the same like medchica... practice q&a, take notes from it what you think is your weakness. dont push yourself when your not in the mood to study 'cause it's useless and wasting time when your brain is not absorbing anymore! dont forget to take a break sometimes.. books are your reference only but by practicing Q&A makes you do well especially when choosing the right answer in the choices very trick-able. These might help you in Q&A.. use your nursing process, ABC principles,Maslow's H.
    Good luck


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