Can a BSN major take the NCLEX after his second year of BSN program? - page 2

This seems to be so, I was wondering because I will most likley get accepted by BSN program, but I realy need to work part time after 2 years. So if I have to wait 3 years (to be a RN) for BSN and... Read More

  1. by   suzanne4
    Quote from nursinguy
    I was told to post under the CA section so I did.

    I dont see why not reciprocity can not be changed after I graduate if I take the test again. So thats not a huge issue.
    Reciprocity actually does not exist any longer. It is actually called endorsement, there is no application for reciporcity as there used to be. It exists with the NCLEX exam, but you must meet educational requirements for any other state, and most are that you have completed an approved school of nursing program and have a completed set of transcripts. And again, if you look, this program stated that it was a pilot program, meaning something that they are trying out.

    You take NCLEX once, you do not take it a second time. The passing score is accepted all over the country, that is what has reciprocity. The issue is that your education will be scrutinized before you can get endorsement to another state, and that it where you are going to have issues, that you took the exam before completion of your program.

    CA also has the 30 unit for LVNs. It is only accepted in CA and the LVN can write the NCLEX exam and get an RN license. Issue with that is it cannot be endorses to any other state in the US. Same thing for the LVN that received it for being a corpsman in the military, they are able to challenge the NCLEX-PN in CA and Virginia. If they do pass, and get a license, it cannot be endorses to any state either. This is what your school is trying to tell you..............right now you may think that you are always going to be in CA, but things change, and you may move for soem reason, and then you are going to have issues.
  2. by   nursinguy
    Quote from suzanne4
    Reciprocity actually does not exist any longer. It is actually called endorsement, there is no application for reciporcity as there used to be. It exists with the NCLEX exam, but you must meet educational requirements for any other state, and most are that you have completed an approved school of nursing program and have a completed set of transcripts. And again, if you look, this program stated that it was a pilot program, meaning something that they are trying out.

    You take NCLEX once, you do not take it a second time. The passing score is accepted all over the country, that is what has reciprocity. The issue is that your education will be scrutinized before you can get endorsement to another state, and that it where you are going to have issues, that you took the exam before completion of your program.

    CA also has the 30 unit for LVNs. It is only accepted in CA and the LVN can write the NCLEX exam and get an RN license. Issue with that is it cannot be endorses to any other state in the US. Same thing for the LVN that received it for being a corpsman in the military, they are able to challenge the NCLEX-PN in CA and Virginia. If they do pass, and get a license, it cannot be endorses to any state either. This is what your school is trying to tell you..............right now you may think that you are always going to be in CA, but things change, and you may move for soem reason, and then you are going to have issues.
    My whole family lives here, so there is next to no chance I will ever move. I think why they allow you to take it before you graduate at Sac State is because you have finished the same material a ADN would after 2 years and only the nursing managment classes are left after the second year in which ADN's do not need to take the NCLEX.
  3. by   caroladybelle
    My whole family lives in Florida, as I did when I graduated nursing school.

    I am now a nurse in Maryland....and have worked in NY, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Georgia, and the Carolinas.

    We are all different and I am sure that we think that we know the plans for the rest of our life....but life does frequently change.

    This is also a "pilot" program, meaning that its continuence is debatable. If many people take the route/shortcut that you are trying to take, the program may find itself in jeopardy with the state. And if it closes after not having a sucessful "pilot", it cause problems with future employment.

    The other issue is that someone mistakenly believes that first, an associate's program is only two years long. The vast majority of associate's programs for the nonnurse/nonBA/nonAA student require three years worth of credits rather than two years. As to a BSN program for nonAA/nonBA/nonnurses actually covering the same things in two years that most programs require three years for is debatable. Yes, they may cover the "basics" of mechanically being a nurse or letting you pass the test, but as to whether you should be working as a RN without a full education is debatable. This not a good shortcut to take.

    You may also have difficulty with employers and rightly so. The vast majority will want your date of graduation. While you can explain that your program was "special/pilot", most recruiters (who often hold a traditional BSN from a routine program) will hold a rightly obtained idea that the first two years of any BSN program does not equal ASN or ADN, by any stretch of the imagination. Frankly, three years of the usual BSN does not equal ADN/ASN, and even graduated BSNs sometimes find difficult being placed until they get experience. Unless the recruiter investigates carefully (and few do), or they just are looking for any warm body (DANGER, Will Robinson, DANGER), it will make it harder to be hired.

    There is also a misconception here, in that ASN/ADN do cover management issues...not to mention I do not know of a BSN program that takes TWO years to cover management issues, that are unessential to passing the NCLEX. If so they are not demonstrating very good management of themselves.
  4. by   suzanne4
    Quote from nursinguy
    My whole family lives here, so there is next to no chance I will ever move. I think why they allow you to take it before you graduate at Sac State is because you have finished the same material a ADN would after 2 years and only the nursing managment classes are left after the second year in which ADN's do not need to take the NCLEX.
    Again, that is a specific program, most are not like that. And even what you posted about it states Pilot Program, meaning that they are testing it out.

    And never say never about moving, you never know what will happen in the future.................and I can personally vouch for that.

    You always have the choice of what you want to do, but do not focus on right now, there are many years ahead for you. And consider that.
  5. by   nursinguy
    [quote=suzanne4]again, that is a specific program, most are not like that. and even what you posted about it states pilot program, meaning that they are testing it out.[quote]

    i seems to be still in place as the nclex forms still state the same thing, only need 4 semesters to take the nclex.
    you can read that here.

    [color=#006666]notification of intent to take the nclex-rn form.

    and never say never about moving, you never know what will happen in the future.................and i can personally vouch for that.

    you always have the choice of what you want to do, but do not focus on right now, there are many years ahead for you. and consider that.
    thanks for the advice.
  6. by   nursinguy
    Quote from caroladybelle
    My whole family lives in Florida, as I did when I graduated nursing school.

    I am now a nurse in Maryland....and have worked in NY, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Georgia, and the Carolinas.

    We are all different and I am sure that we think that we know the plans for the rest of our life....but life does frequently change.

    This is also a "pilot" program, meaning that its continuence is debatable. If many people take the route/shortcut that you are trying to take, the program may find itself in jeopardy with the state. And if it closes after not having a sucessful "pilot", it cause problems with future employment.

    The other issue is that someone mistakenly believes that first, an associate's program is only two years long. The vast majority of associate's programs for the nonnurse/nonBA/nonAA student require three years worth of credits rather than two years. As to a BSN program for nonAA/nonBA/nonnurses actually covering the same things in two years that most programs require three years for is debatable. Yes, they may cover the "basics" of mechanically being a nurse or letting you pass the test, but as to whether you should be working as a RN without a full education is debatable. This not a good shortcut to take.

    You may also have difficulty with employers and rightly so. The vast majority will want your date of graduation. While you can explain that your program was "special/pilot", most recruiters (who often hold a traditional BSN from a routine program) will hold a rightly obtained idea that the first two years of any BSN program does not equal ASN or ADN, by any stretch of the imagination. Frankly, three years of the usual BSN does not equal ADN/ASN, and even graduated BSNs sometimes find difficult being placed until they get experience. Unless the recruiter investigates carefully (and few do), or they just are looking for any warm body (DANGER, Will Robinson, DANGER), it will make it harder to be hired.

    There is also a misconception here, in that ASN/ADN do cover management issues...not to mention I do not know of a BSN program that takes TWO years to cover management issues, that are unessential to passing the NCLEX. If so they are not demonstrating very good management of themselves.
    Why would it matter though in the long run? I will graduate with a BSN a year later.

    Note also the SAC STATE form for taking the NCLEX says you may take it as a none-graduate, meaning the program is still in effect.
  7. by   caroladybelle
    Again, it is irrelevant to ask our advice, as we will not be authorizing you to test/be employed. And you do not seem to be interested in the valid reasons that we have given has to why this shortcut is inadvisable, so what is the purpose in asking us?

    You need to first contact the BON to see if you can test early and you need to also contact the HR department of the facilities that you seek to be employed by as THEY will decide whether you may be hired without graduating from a nursing program. Those are the parties who can give you the answers that you seek.

    The other issue is graduation is not a guarantee. Every year in nursing programs across the state, people fail the final term or two of the program. Out of my local program, 72 people start nursing school and maybe 20-30 pass (frequently falling behind a term or two due to failure). Roughly 10-20 fail out in the last two semesters. And very few of them ever expected to fail at all. Many of them tested quite well on practice Boards, but that did not change the fact that they failed enough course work to be failed from the program.

    Currently, many facilities will not hire new grads until they are indeed GRADS, and in many cases not until they pass Boards. Knowing the failure rate of students in those final terms, many may not want to take the chance on a "possibly soon to be BSN" but passed the Boards early case. You need to contact them as to your hirability.
  8. by   nursinguy
    Quote from caroladybelle
    Again, it is irrelevant to ask our advice, as we will not be authorizing you to test/be employed. And you do not seem to be interested in the valid reasons that we have given has to why this shortcut is inadvisable, so what is the purpose in asking us?
    To see if anyone has done it, it apears no one has or those that have don't frequent this board.


    The other issue is graduation is not a guarantee. Every year in nursing programs across the state, people fail the final term or two of the program. Out of my local program, 72 people start nursing school and maybe 20-30 pass (frequently falling behind a term or two due to failure). Roughly 10-20 fail out in the last two semesters. And very few of them ever expected to fail at all. Many of them tested quite well on practice Boards, but that did not change the fact that they failed enough course work to be failed from the program.
    I'm aware of this, I'm always at the top of my class so I'm not worried about failing. Thanks though anyways.
  9. by   tinta06
    Quote from nursinguy
    To see if anyone has done it, it apears no one has or those that have don't frequent this board.



    I'm aware of this, I'm always at the top of my class so I'm not worried about failing. Thanks though anyways.

    Having a peace of mind is the most important thing in nursing. Most nurses know where they come from, but they do not know where they are going. They can plan their future but their plans are not always guaranteed and stable. As far as I’m concerned, all plans are always tentative when it comes to real life. However, one can try to make them revolve around their initial plan by avoiding taking obvious risks to begin with.
    In U.S.A., most BSN programs have a 16 months (four semesters) completion for BSN degree. This applies to people with required pre-requisites or other bachelor degrees especially BS, how about trying that route?
    The other opinion is, go ahead with your plan, if you think it will work for you. However, you should be prepared to go back to school if circumstances arise. Good luck in whatever decision you make.
    Last edit by tinta06 on Sep 5, '06
  10. by   nursinguy
    Quote from tinta06
    In U.S.A., most BSN programs have a 16 weeks completion for BSN degree. This applies to people with required pre-requisites or other bachelor degrees especially BS, how about trying that route?
    .
    Havent heard of this explain to me what it means, I'm a little lost.
  11. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from nursinguy
    Havent heard of this explain to me what it means, I'm a little lost.
    At the risk of speaking out of turn, since I saw this, I'll offer this up. I believe tinta is referring to an accelerated BSN program, which requires one to have already completed pre-reqs for that program and/or hold a prior Bachelor's degree in something else. Since you are already IN a BSN program, I don't see how dropping out and trying to start anew in an accelerated program (anywhere from 16-24 months) would benefit you.

    Just my two cents.
  12. by   nursinguy
    Quote from RNsRWe
    At the risk of speaking out of turn, since I saw this, I'll offer this up. I believe tinta is referring to an accelerated BSN program, which requires one to have already completed pre-reqs for that program and/or hold a prior Bachelor's degree in something else. Since you are already IN a BSN program, I don't see how dropping out and trying to start anew in an accelerated program (anywhere from 16-24 months) would benefit you.

    Just my two cents.
    Ah, there arn't many that have a accererated programs around here.

    My delemia is I have enough money to do 2 years of nursing school then I have to work part time. I have a wife and 3 kids so not working after 2 years is not a option for me. So its either take the 2 year ADN and pass the NCLEX or do a 3 year BSN and hopefully be able to take the NCLEX after 2 years just like the ADNS do and then work part time, it will take one year longer to graduate with my BSN.
    SO either ADN and 2 years, or hopefully BSN take the NCLEX after 2 years then do the extra 20 units the last year for my BSN.
  13. by   caroladybelle
    So ask those in charge of the program and facilities that might hire you? They would be your most accurate source of info and quicker than the internet.

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