The Ultimate PDA? - page 3

I just found out from my school that smartphones aren't allowed. I had my heart set on the HTC TYTN and have been holding out on buying a new phone/contract for around 6 months. I am... Read More

  1. by   Cherish
    Quote from FAworld
    Someone mentioned uploading powerpoints and other documents between their pc and PDA. With the Palm having it's own OS, does anyone know if you can document share between a Windows OS (on a laptop) and a Palm PDA?

    I'm liking how the Palm TX sounds but it would be great if I could share documents (such as homework) between my Windows-based laptop and the PDA.

    I'm wondering the same thing. My laptop uses Vista but my Desktop is an XP OS. Hope someone can answer this question. I want to buy the Palm TX tomorrow since there is a sale going on.
  2. by   Indy
    Quote from Kabin
    PDAs are good if you can accept limited functionality. The industry has been trying to move to the $700 ultimate mobile PCs (UMPC). They have all the computer functionality minus phone. There's some talk now of UMPCs with phone function.

    I've played with smartphones at the store and if anyone is hoping for real internet capability you'll probably be disappointed. They don't play well with secure sites (stocks, banks) and you need to hope the websites you frequent have dummied down mobile friendly interfaces.
    That's true, however, I don't really need the internet on my phone. I'd have a landline instead of a cell if I hadn't accidentally taken the narc keys home with me one morning, prompting my husband to go get me a cell. For people who need internet while doing anything but sitting in front of the computer at home or work, the devices probably do have a ways to go. Speaking of which, god how I like the look of that little OQO thing. So cute! My hands could probably actually work that keyboard! And I believe it's got the same RAM as my computer, with a hard drive that puts mine to shame. However, I'm gonna buy a house before I go playing around with one of those things, and knowing my husband, I'd have to buy two.

    What I am enjoying about the toys they come out with is that they don't all seem to do the same things. There are "limited functionality" things all over the place, and so you can pick and choose what you want, or pay an ohmigosh price and get 'em all in one.
  3. by   joyfulgal
    I am also looking to buy a pda. My two favorite choices are either the Palm TX, or the Dell. The concern I have with the Palm is that my laptop and home PC have Windows OS while the Palm has its own OS. Which will be more compatible or convenient for me to use in the long run? Any suggestions will be of great value in making this decision. Just a note, we have a Dell PC and are completely impressed with the products they offer, but I am unsure of the quality of the pda's they manufacture...I need intel, what do you think?
  4. by   justme1972
    I had the Cingular 8125...and it was a nightmare. Never, ever worked the way they said it did...they don't ALLOW you to carry insurance on the phone. Their service is expensive for web, so slow you'll feel like you are dying...the batteries don't even last 1 year.

    I had my exchanged TWICE, and both times I had to file complaints with the BBB before they would do anything. Most of the tech support people that they have, aren't even trained on how the phone operated, and it was ALWAYS falling offline to where you could not send or receive calls. Battery time was also only 30% of what was originally stated.

    The Treos, I have heard great things about.
  5. by   IrishIzCPNP
    Quote from joyfulgal
    I am also looking to buy a pda. My two favorite choices are either the Palm TX, or the Dell. The concern I have with the Palm is that my laptop and home PC have Windows OS while the Palm has its own OS. Which will be more compatible or convenient for me to use in the long run? Any suggestions will be of great value in making this decision. Just a note, we have a Dell PC and are completely impressed with the products they offer, but I am unsure of the quality of the pda's they manufacture...I need intel, what do you think?



    I actually spoke to some people about my classmates PDA (read people I had to get on the phone and I didn't know) and I was told 2 things...first guy said that the Dell the students had was known to have problems. The second guy said "oh yeah I had the PDA one step up that was made to fix the problems of the other one". Now the problem still is that none of them have been able to get Dell to "fix" or replace them. They make "attempts" to fix it over the phone but it's not something that can be fixed.

    So it seems clear that the students I know got a crappy Dell and it's a known crappy Dell. Now it's just waiting to see if Dell will every do anything about it.
  6. by   joyfulgal
    Regardless of which pda I end up choosing, I am convinced that I should cover my AR$$...with a good warrenty just in case it turns into crap-o-la.
  7. by   IrishIzCPNP
    Just sharing a free download...

    http://www.acc.org/qualityandscience...adpcpocket.htm

    I think all the other freebies I have on my PDA have been listed here in the past.
  8. by   West_Coast_Ken
    Quote from FAworld
    Someone mentioned uploading powerpoints and other documents between their pc and PDA. With the Palm having it's own OS, does anyone know if you can document share between a Windows OS (on a laptop) and a Palm PDA?
    Yes, there are several programs that allow for exchange between a PDA and the desktop.

    Documents To Go is one that comes to mind for the Palm. This one does Word, Excel, PDF, PowerPoint, MS Access, etc. It's pretty powerful.
  9. by   MedSurgeMess
    I have a LifeDrive (Palm OS) and use Document To Go and have had awesome luck with it--I luv it!!!!!
  10. by   TKBSN2b
    I have been looking around at PDAs myself and found that CNET has always been helpful when it comes advice on the best in electronics. Here is a link that gives CNETs top 5 picks for PDAs:

    http://reviews.cnet.com/4370-3127_7-...1.html?tag=dir
  11. by   Kabin
    My Axim x50v was getting long in the tooth so I purchased an ATT Tilt smartphone. It has everything my PDA had plus G3 phone/internet/email, WiFI, built in GPS, QWERT keyboard, more memory, more compact for a sweetheart deal of $99 with a 2 year phone contract. Now I carry and charge one item rather than my old phone, GPS receiver, and PDA.
  12. by   karlita
    Wow! This information is just what I was looking for. I have been researching PDAs for about a month now while I save up. I was really having a difficult time deciding if I would just get a PDA or a smartphone. My heart is now set on the HP iPaq hx2795. I never thought that having a smartphone might not be allowed at work or school. I haven't asked, but the threat is enought to make me steer clear of it. I don't really see carrying a phone and PDA as a big inconvenience since they're both small. Besides, I hardly use my phone so it will be perfect! Thanks for the information!

    Quote from cinqly
    I also had my heart set on the HTC phone from Cingular (branded as Cingular 8125/8525). HOWEVER, my phone decided to die 6 months ahead of schedule, and even though my contract was up, I didn't have the money to purchase the smartphone. I ended up getting a Razr (and a headset!!!), and my dreams of the smartphone went down the tubes.

    After this, I started seriously looking into PDA devices. I have come to the conclusion that I am glad that my phone died ahead of schedule. Although smartphones are great, and are very useful to professions both in and out of the medical fields, I decided that the performance, flexiblity, and durability of the PDA seems to outweigh that of a smartphone. I have listed my conclusions, as well as the devices I am considering buying, and I hope this helps. Keep in mind it is only one person's opinion, but I was drooling over that HTC phone for months, thinking it would be perfect for me. It turns out that I probably would have ultimately been pretty disappointed with it's performance.

    Smartphones
    ---The advantage to a smartphone is that you have your phone and PDA all rolled into one. You don't have to switch back and forth between devices, or even lug two devices around. Need to make a phone call? Great! Need to check your schedule while on the phone? Do it! The smartphone is great for that kind of flexibility. Nursing reality check: you can't use a cell phone in the hospital/clinicals, so you don't need to lug a cell phone around anyway. So having a smartphone is useless at work, because you'll have to disable the phone feature.
    ---A smartphone is good if you need to constantly be on the internet, and are making extensive use of your phone carrier's network capibilities. If you feel the need to check your e-mail or browse the internet every 30 minutes, then a smartphone is useful. Even so, you have to pony up for a data plan (usually $50 for unlimited access), and be in an area that has fast-access internet for phones. Nursing reality check: I'm not sure on this, but I would venture to guess that if you can't use a cell phone in the hospital, you probably can't use the data connect either. I would double check to be sure.
    ---If you like texting, or plan on doing a lot of writing on your device, then I can see the allure of the smartphone. Most smartphones have qwerty keyboards, and the HTC is especially cool with it's slide out keyboard. Although they take some getting used to, it can be helpful if you are entering in a bunch of text, or constantly sending text messages. (FYI: I have also read on several message boards of complaints of that very same slide-out keyboard breaking, or getting loose.)
    ---The average life of a cell phone is about 2 years. In reality, NONE of my cell-phones have lasted more than about 12-15 months before breaking or malfunctioning in some major way. It's not that I treat them badly or drop them all the time, they are just not MADE to last a long time. They know that your contract lasts 2 years, and they know that phones, though expensive, don't last quite that long. Unless you have had extraordinary experience with cell phones lasting years, I could only expect that a smartphone would have about the same life-span on it. Also, smartphones are just that...phones first, PDAs second. They are fancy phones. Just something to think about...
    ---Expansion: I believe the HTC uses micro SD cards...expensive, and hard to find quality cards.
    ---NO INSURANCE!!!!! Cingular won't offer insurance on most of their higher end phones, aka smartphones. So, after the 1 year warranty runs out, you are screwed if something goes wrong. I don't know about other providers, but on a 500 dollar device, I'd check first.

    PDA
    ---No phone....BUT! If your PDA device has bluetooth, it may be able to sync up with your phone! You can download certain programs that will sync up with your phone so that you can dial from your PDA! I believe you can dial from a number pad (like a regular phone), or even from your address book/contacts page! This means that if you also have a bluetooth headset, the phone stays in the pocket/purse, and you can pretend like you only have one device! Naughty!
    ---There is no keyboard on a PDA. However, IMO the grafitti feature is easy to learn and use, and if you practice enough you can get pretty fast at entering text. Plus, many PDAs have a notepad feature, where you can directly write your notes/message onto the screen. Also, you can purchase small portable keyboards if you want a life-like feel for typing into your PDA.
    ---If you don't need to incessantly check your e-mail, but like to use the internet and browse every once-in-a-while, then a PDA with wi-fi would suit your needs. Most upper end PDAs (think: at least $200) have wi-fi, which will automatically connect to a wireless internet. You can use your PDA to surf the net, download programs, and check e-mail anywhere there's a wi-fi signal: home, coffee shops, libraries, schools, and yes: most hospitals!!! Plus, wi-fi doesn't interfere with hospital cell-phone policy, unlike the cellular network plans.
    ---The average PDA user seems to report having their devices for a minimum of 2 years, up to 4 (or more). It seems that the devices are constructed better than the average smart phone. Also, they are built specifically for use as a PDA. I've known several people to have a treo, and if it lasts through their 2-year contract, then they have ALL had to buy new devices.
    ---Screen resolution is generally better on a PDA, especially the higher end models. Plus, some of the newer models have screen rotation (although so does the HTC).
    ---Ability for easy, cheap expansion. Most use SD (Palm does), and with the right sale you can get a 2G SD card for under $30.
    ---More program availbility. There are generally fewer PDA models, and they aren't released as often. This means that the amount of software and availability is much greater. Plus, most PDAs run one of two platforms: PALM or WindowsMobile. It sometimes seems like programs have to be updated or tweaked in order to be compatable with certain smartphones. Don't believe me? Go to handango.com and check the program availability for the HTC. Then check the availibility for a palm device (such as Palm TX). No contest.
    ---WARRANTY! Depending on where you buy your PDA, you can usually get a warranty to extend and augment the manufacturers warranty. Usually ranging from 1-3 years, these warrantys cover wear and tear from normal use. Translation: screen cracks, hardware problems, or if the dang thing just quits working. If they can't fix it, they replace the device or write you a check and you can get something else. Just don't drop it in the toilet...

    Anyway, I could probably think of some other stuff, but whatever! That seems like enough. The devices I am considering buying:

    Palm Tungsten E2--$199
    http://www.palm.com/us/products/handhelds/tx/
    Palm TX--$299
    http://www.palm.com/us/products/handhelds/tx/
    Palm Life Drive--$399 (awesome)
    http://www.palm.com/us/products/mobi...ers/lifedrive/
    Dell Axim X51--on sale for $239
    http://www.dell.com/content/products...=19&l=en&s=dhs

    I have used the TX and Life Drive, and they are very easy to use. The screen size is awesome on both, and I like the way the features are arranged. As far as the E2, it's very similar to the other Palm's, but it has a little grafitri area on the bottom 3rd of the screen which takes up valuable screen space. I haven't tried the Dell's, but they look nice and are on sale right now. It just depends on whether you want Palm OS or WindowsMobile. I am leaning towards the Palm.

    Anyway, hope this helps. If you have any question post them here or private message me.
  13. by   Kabin
    I downloaded a slick, free program on my phone. Its called VITO Findme. In the event I lose my phone or someone steals it I send a text message which activates the on board GPS for current location and the phone sends an email with GPS coordinates to me. My wife purchased on too as ATT had a 50% off sale last weekend ($150). We downloaded the program on her's too.

    By the way, 2GB microSD cards can be had for $35 which is alot chaper than when I purchased a 2GB SD card for my Dell Axim x50V. The Tilt can use up to 32GB microSD cards which aren't available yet.

    I have no complaints with the Tilt's on or off board performance. It's a broadband 3.5G phone and supports HSDPA which can hit download cable modem speeds. There isn't another phone/PDA combo on the market that competes.

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