Clinical Use of Palm Pilots - page 3

I am interested in hearing how nurses use Palm Pilots at the bedside. How are they helpful? What software do you use? Should other nurses use them? Please feel free to contact me... Read More

  1. by   chaosRN
    For you fellow Palm users:

    I'd like to know, what type of case you use at work. I don't want to break my palms screen by leaning over a bed rail, or bumping into the nurses station. I have a zip case now, harder to get in & out of quickly. I'm thinking about one of the hard aluminum cases. I'd just like some thoughts or ideas.

    Thank You!
    ChaosRN
  2. by   Underbedmonster
    I figured if I invested that much in the PDA itself, I needed to protect my investment with a hard-sided aluminum case. Check Amazon.com for really good deals. Alternatively, Ebay has some, but Amazon had the best deal for this item.
  3. by   chaosRN
    Thank you for you reply Underbedmonster! I'll give thoes a try!
  4. by   tmylen
    Hello to all! At the hospital where I work, the glucometer or accucheck machine is a modified palm. It has a barcode scanner and test strip insertion port built into a case that encloses the palm. When we do an accucheck we scan the patients wrist band, scan our ID badges then proceed to do the accucheck. It's a nice little setup. There is a hotsync cradle attached to a modem that transmits the info to the lab. The lab ensures the machines get their daily QA routines done.

    My hobbies are electronics and computers. I can program palms using NSBasic or CodeWarrior. I also do embedded computer programming. Zilog has a nice chip that has an IR port and ethernet link built into the chip. It would be very easy to use generic palms to capture clinical information for transfer to the hospital's system using the IR port. Hospitals could buy generic palms, load a program onto them, attach a barcode scanner to the serial or usb hotsync port and have a tool that could capture bedside information. Using barcodes decreases errors and the software on the palm could mask and encrypt the data to conform with HIPAA. Instead of using the IR port or hotsync to transfer info you can also get palms with wireless elthernet capabilities including Bluetooth. But if you stick with the hotsync/IR method, then clinicians could use their own palms with hospital supplied software a barcode attachments. It could even be used with medication administration to reduce errors.

    This technology is already out their. I can use it as an amateur so you know that it can be used by the professional system developers. I don't know why it isn't more widespread. Especially now with the HIPAA, hospital error rates in the news, and JACHO zeroing in on process improvement and tracer methodology. Maybe hospitals consider it to be an escalation of technological complexity that they don't see an easy way to manage. They would have to add IS staff that had the additional skills in this area which may not be an overly populated manpower resource at this time.

    Just my two cents. I have looked at the other sites listed here and it is coming along. It just seems that a company would introduce a middleware capability that could talk with any hospital system. Maybe I'm naieve (sp?) in this area.
  5. by   janetrette
    hi,

    my dad just brought me a palmone tungsten / e and i'm not sure should i keep it? i read the previous entry but i'm clueless on these. please kindly, could anyone explain to me what's palm os? is this palmone tungsten / e good? and most importantly where i could get medical related dl for free? i know there's expocrates for drug guides. however, any free medical dictionary???

    thanks in advance.....
  6. by   RNCENCCRNNREMTP
    Quote from janetrette
    hi,

    my dad just brought me a palmone tungsten / e and i'm not sure should i keep it? i read the previous entry but i'm clueless on these. please kindly, could anyone explain to me what's palm os? is this palmone tungsten / e good? and most importantly where i could get medical related dl for free? i know there's expocrates for drug guides. however, any free medical dictionary???

    thanks in advance.....
    The PalmOne Tungsten E is a GREAT device. I tell all of my co-workers in the ER to get this one. Palm OS means Palm operating system which means the handheld uses the very nice system created by Palm (vs a Pocket PC which uses a microsoft operating system). Epocrates is a great product, comes either as a free, limited version or a more robust version for an annual subscription fee. There are many great sites out there for free and paid programs.

    Try these out:

    www.palmgear.com

    www.meistermed.com

    www.aetherpalm.com

    www.pdacortex.com

    http://freewarepalm.com

    Hope these help get you started.

    Andrew
  7. by   limandri
    I am an advanced practice psych nurse with prescriptive authority. I use my Tungsten T3 constantly in my practice. I have a prescribing program that I use to write prescriptions and beam to my printer to be printed out or I can send directly to the pharmacy. Once a week I back up all my data with the company which maintains my patient files on their server in case I have an unfortunate wipe out. I signed a HIPAA statement to include the company as an associate to maintain privacy records.

    I also am a heavy user of Epocrates (free ware) for drug info sufficient for general use as well as important prescribing info (e.g., drug half life, adverse effects, pregnancy rating, etc).

    I also use Psych D and A2ZDrugs. A good resource for PDA software for health care is Skyscape.
    I find my PDA as essential to my practice as any book I would know. Plus if I have a no show I can always play Scrabble!
  8. by   nightingale
    I am very pleased to see this thread alive and continuing.

    I had to chuckle and can relate to the "Scrabble" when bored and my brain wants sometime to stimulate me.
  9. by   limandri
    Quote from rninformatics
    Babies makes an excellent point about patient health information (PHI) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.

    Understanding and complying with this federal mandate affects nursing and nursing informatics practice. Everyone who deals with identifiable patient information needs to be aware of the implications as HIPAA directs how we handle patient information written, verbal and electronic. Everyone who works in healthcare has a responsibility to keep patient information confidential.

    In the case of such PHI stored on a PDA a responsible clinician needs to ask themselves: Is the information protected and secure? If you lose the device will that private pt info (identifiable pt. information includes: the patient's name, diagnosis, lab tests, vital signs, ss #, address, etc.,) be accessible to someone who is not involved in that patient's care and therefore has no right to view such information?

    There are penalties for failure to meet the privacy regulations and for inappropriately disclosing or receiving patient health information. Penalties can be either criminal or civil and can result in monetary fines, imprisonment, or both. Monetary penalties range from $100 to $100,000 depending upon severity. Imprisonment can be for up to 10 years depending on severity. Both institutions and individuals can be held liable for breaches in patient privacy and confidentiality, as the penalties do not just apply to organizations. HIPAA compliance requires the use of appropriate technology, education, changes in previous practice patterns and implementation of organizational policies and procedures.

    3 articles that cover the use of PDAs and HIPAA--

    http://www.pdamd.com/vertical/features/HIPAA1.xml

    http://www.pdamd.com/vertical/features/HIPAA2.xml

    http://www.pdamd.com/vertical/features/HIPAA3.xml
    There are several ways to comply with HIPAA and use the PDA to its fullest potential. One way is to have double password protection, i.e., have a different password to gain entry to the PDA and enter a particular program with pt info. Another is to have a business associate agreement with the software company that may store pt info. I checked with our university counsel and found this was the legal way of doing it. Thirdly, in calendar where you may schedule patients use only initials or some code or first name without any trace back to original data or identifiable info. I'm in psych and that is essential for me. When you dispose of your old PDA or any computer, reformat the hard disk to be sure to remove any identifiable data.
  10. by   marys
    Hi,

    I am a former software project manager of wireless applications that is changing careers to nursing. I am finding that the PDA could become as invaluable as your stethescope.!! I think that there is so many applications that could be placed on PDAs. Like charting at the bedside, looking up info. For students put those care plans on the PDA so that you don't have to spend hrs typing them up and turning them in. I think that the applications are endless. Think about documenting a wound. If you had a camera built in, just like a camera phone, (the new ones are coming out) - you could have that picture in the chart. It is worth a thousand words..

    mar
  11. by   marys
    Hi everyone,

    I am a second semester RN student looking for a topic in Ethical issues in Nursing. One of the issues that I am seeing in some places like Medscape is on the use of MDSS systems. Also on the cost effectiveness of building these types of systems.

    Has anyone run into ethical issues when building software for nurses or medical professionals? Does anyone have any other ideas?

    Thanks,

    mar
  12. by   limandri
    Mary,
    Thanks for your note about the many possibilities with PDAs. It removes the possible error of not being able to read someone's writing and allows immediate notations. If nursing services then have Bluetooth capacity (wireless beaming to printers and networked computers) there could be seamless transfer of information, therefore no transcription errors.

    Quote from marys
    Hi,

    I am a former software project manager of wireless applications that is changing careers to nursing. I am finding that the PDA could become as invaluable as your stethescope.!! I think that there is so many applications that could be placed on PDAs. Like charting at the bedside, looking up info. For students put those care plans on the PDA so that you don't have to spend hrs typing them up and turning them in. I think that the applications are endless. Think about documenting a wound. If you had a camera built in, just like a camera phone, (the new ones are coming out) - you could have that picture in the chart. It is worth a thousand words..

    mar
  13. by   TMPaul
    Quote from love4neos
    I LOVE MY PALM PILOT!!! I use my drug book most on it, but I also have lab values, personal patient info, and my own tidbit notes stored. My date book and address book are also there, and that is very convienent. I keep it in my back pocket of my scrubs at ALL times. It has to be the handiest tool ever, and though they are expensive...they are tax deductible!!
    I use mine daily in my NP practice. I've got Epocrates (drug program), ARTbeat (medalert info), BONES (anatomy pt. ed onfo), CDC info, Eponyms info, Pockey EKG, pocket translator, NBC agent text (Nuclear, Biological,Chemical treatments), and medical calculators loaded.

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