Clinical Use of Palm Pilots - page 2

I am interested in hearing how nurses use Palm Pilots at the bedside. How are they helpful? What software do you use? Should other nurses use them? Please feel free to contact me... Read More

  1. by   nightingale
    I tried Handera (black and white) and Handspring (B & W also) before settling on my Palm 515 (color). I love my palm and it goes everywhere with me. I can see the color screen with ease, I have an SD card to store downloads (with the reader on my palm harddrive (is that the right terminology?).

    When I researched the PDA vs Pocket Pc it was clear there was much more available to download for the PDA in healthcare. I think that will change as the technology grows. My Palm is handy in my pocket when I need it; I usually wear a lab coat to be sure I have enough space. I am thinking of getting a "holster" to carr my Palm on a belt etc.
  2. by   rninformatics
    Nurses Taking Technology into Their Own Hands

    http://www.nursezone.com/job/DevicesandTechnology.asp
  3. by   RNCENCCRNNREMTP
    Below is a list of Palm programs and sites to obtain.

    Currently use a nearly full Palm 515 and 128mb expansion card

    Please let me know if questions or need help.

    Unbound Medicine Titles (www.unboundmedicine.com)
    Lippincott's Nursing Drug Guide
    Pocket Guide to Diagnostic Tests
    Pocket Pediatrics with MEDLINE Search
    5 Minute Clinical Consult
    Unbound Surgery
    (Currently trialing these titles and comparing to Skyscape apps listed below)

    ER Suite (Extensive adult/peds reference) www.medicalwizards.com

    5 Minute Consults (These are great Palm reference texts that give you the high points of almost any medical condition, invaluable www.skyscape.com, kind of expensive though usually $50 or more, no deals for RN's)
    Cardiac
    Clinical
    Emergency
    Pediatrics
    Toxicology

    Also from Skyscape:
    Handbook of Fractures
    Ifacts (Drug Facts and Comparisons)
    Tabers
    Harriett Lane

    Johns Hopkins Antibiotic Guide (Very nice, FREE, gets frequent FREE updates via a web connection) ( www.hopkins-abxguide.com )

    Big Clock FREE (Allows me to set alarms to remind me to do things in the ED) (www.palmgear.com)

    Pocket Radiologist (Has XRay, CT, MRI images of 100 common disease/trauma processes grouped by body area or age group{head, spine, chest, abdomen, pediatrics, and more} I have head and pediatrics on my system. Kind of expensive but a great reference and teaching tool) www.pocketradiologist.com

    Eponyms (Overhear a Doctor say "Bezold-Jarisch reflex" and don't know what it means, look it up here www.eponyms.net )

    Code Blue (A medical calculator, input the patients age or weight and you can calculate for RSI, ACLS, Tube sizes, Neuro drugs, and burn area calculation) www.eminnovations.com/codeblue

    Epocrates RxPro ( drug guide, allows for own notes) www.epocrates.com
    Epocrates ID ( infectious disease guide, included with the paid version of 6.0 Pro)

    Tarascon Pharmacopeia (currently in Beta test stage but I have found to be very stable. Expansion card capable which is good as it is about 2.5MB in size (same as epocrates which does not go easily if at all to expansion card. FREE for now at least, you must register with the web site. http://www.usbmis-test.com/beta/beta_test.php


    Datebook 5.0 (Best datebook upgrade, color support, icons, tie-ins with your other original apps (to, memo, address) www.pimlicosoftware.com

    Handbase (lets you make your own databases, I track our Level 1 trauma patients and my procedures (central lines, intubations, etc), upload to my PC, print out if needed for distribution or filing) http://www.ddhsoftware.com/handbase.html

    Infusicalc (Great tool for calculating drip rates for medication infusions, you can program for your hospital standards and then just plug in weight/dose and boom you have infusion rate!!! This is SO SWEET!!!!!!!)(Newest version allows for calculating a bolus and infusion withoutn having to create a new page) www.aetherpalm.com


    iSilo (Document reader, all titles below are from Yahoo medical ware groups or Palmgear or Meistermed iSilo)
    ACLS 2000
    Acid Base Disorders
    Acute Renal Failure
    Algorithm for Rash Diagnosis
    Asthma
    Cecil's Medicine Text
    Chest X-Ray Guide
    Clinical Medicine Consult 2.9
    Congenital Heart defects and repair (nice diagrams discussing defect and repairs)
    Craniofacial Trauma
    Dermatome maps
    Differential Dx
    Handbook of Drug Administration (from Australia, gives good interaction data)
    Harrison's Internal Medicine 15th Edition
    Hematology/Oncology Emergencies
    HyperTox 2002 (a good toxicology reference tool)
    Interpretation of Dx Tests
    Ishihara Color Plates
    Long QT Syndrome
    Lytemesiter
    OB Emergencies
    Physiology review
    Principles of Surgery
    Procedures in Medicine (from the makers of Clinical Medicine Consult)
    Robert's Emergency procedures
    Peds Base
    Schwartz's Textbook of Surgery
    Washington Manual of Surgery
    Washington Manual
    Will's Eye Manual
    Vanderbilt NICU Manual
    Ventilator Waveforms
    CDC STD 2002 Guidelines (The ED docs love this program, good reference tool)
    USAMRID 2001 (Bio Warfare)
    Thrombophilia
    Metabolic Syndrome
    Nerve Roots and Dermatomes
    LFT's and management
    Hemodynamic waves interp.
    Endocarditis Prophylaxis
    Coronary artery diagram (great for bedside teaching)
    APAP OD Nomogram
    A fib Tx guidelines

    EM Guide Maps (From Jeff Mann's web site converted to iSilo format, need iSilo X converter from www.isilo.com to convert web pages to iSilo format) http://emguidemaps.homestead.com/Jef...guidemaps.html
    Spinal Cord Syndromes
    Blood Transfusion Reactions
    Penetrating Neck Trauma
    Head Injury
    Concussion
    Syncope
    Blood/Fluid Exposure Protocol


    Riley Kidometer (BEST reference tool for bedside and emergency pediatrics)

    Medcalc (FREE) www.palmgear.com

    Medrules (FREE) www.palmgear.com

    OB Pregnancy Wheel (FREE) www.palmgear.com


    TIMI Risk Calculator and Guidelines (Helps address management and predicts outcomes of patients with unstable angina, early ST elevation MI and STEMI based on current ACC guidelines)(FREE from www.timi.org)

    Apprisor (AHA/ACC Guidelines) www.mobilemedica.com
    UA/NSTEMI
    CHF
    Afib
    AMI

    Wordsmith (Document tool, lets you use Word style formatting on your Palm, very good upgrade, www.bluenomad.com)

    Using this I have created about 300 of my own helpful guides for ED care. A lot are based on flow charts from EM practice journal)

    Try the sites below for more Palm medical software.


    http://www.bluenomad.com/
    This is where you will find, Wordsmith (word processor that links with Word and works very well with the keyboard (the folding keyboard is a MUST if you plan on entering a lot of data away from your desktop), Backupbuddy ( a MUST have to save your files in case of a hard reset) and Backupbuddy VFS which allows you to back up to an expansion card for retrieving files lost after a hard reset away from your computer)

    http://www.handheldmed.com/
    Medical text library, requires their FREE reader, kind of pricey and sometimes unstable, had it but got rid of it

    http://www.isilo.com/
    Reader that allows you to read many programs, can store the data on an expansion card and save space on the Palm.

    http://www.palmtipsheet.com/
    A nice site that has a monthly update and tips for using the Palm.

    www.palmgear.com
    The main web page for Palm Gear, hundreds if not thousands of software titles for the palm!

    http://www.palmgear.com/software/ans...=120&prodname=
    This is the chronological list of medical software site at Palmgear.com. Newest programs are at the top. About 10-11 pages of medical software. Some free, some cost.

    http://www.kidometer.com/
    The home of the Riley Kidometer. Must have if you are working with kids both emergently and routinely.

    http://www.skyscape.com/index/
    Home of Harriet Lane, 5 minute consult series, Tabers and more. Almost all are expansion card capable.

    www.meistermed.com A great site with a variety of programs covering Asthma, Electrolytes and more.

    http://meistermed.com/isilodepot/ A great site for (mostly free) medical documents that are read by the iSilo reader (see www.isilo.com above).

    http://www.biochemweapons.com/ A free weapons of mass destruction database.

    http://www.pediatricsonhand.com/ A good Palm pediatrics site with free and paid software.
  4. by   NurseMobile
    Hi dwoodruff

    Originally posted by dwoodruff
    I am interested in hearing how nurses use Palm Pilots at the bedside.

    How are they helpful?
    What software do you use?
    Should other nurses use them?

    Thanks,
    The Nursing PDAs Listerv is having a free webinar (web based seminar) on October 1st :



    Webinar Agenda:

    -palmOne "Insider Information"
    -PDAs in Nursing Listserv --- Who we are and what we're doing with our gadgets
    -Palm Powered Handhelds enhance the seamless and safe delivery of nursing care in the Emergency Department

    Check it out http://www.pdacortex.com/Nursing_PDAs_Webinar.htm

    Cheers
    Rob
  5. by   RNCENCCRNNREMTP
    I have a Palm TUngsten C and 128mb expansion card with the following software.....

    Unbound Medicine Titles (www.unboundmedicine.com)
    Lippincott's Nursing Drug Guide
    Pocket Guide to Diagnostic Tests
    Pocket Pediatrics with MEDLINE Search
    5 Minute Clinical Consult
    Unbound Surgery
    (Currently trialing these titles and comparing to Skyscape apps listed below)

    Pepid Emergency Department Suite (www.pepid.com) Pretty impressive, may consider dumping ePocrates for the drug list in this plus it covers about 1500 medical conditions, no pictures/graphs though)

    ER Suite An extensive adult/pediatric ER reference. Drugs, drips, IVF, Tox and more. About $65. Limited free demo (20 uses) ( www.medicalwizards.com)

    5 Minute Consults (These are great Palm reference texts that give you the high points of almost any medical condition, invaluable www.skyscape.com, kind of expensive though usually $50 or more, no deals for RN's)
    Cardiac
    Clinical
    Emergency
    Pediatrics
    Toxicology

    Also from Skyscape:
    Handbook of Fractures
    Ifacts (Drug Facts and Comparisons)
    Tabers
    Harriett Lane

    Johns Hopkins Antibiotic Guide (Very nice, FREE, gets frequent FREE updates via a web connection) ( www.hopkins-abxguide.com )

    Big Clock FREE (Allows me to set alarms to remind me to do things in the ED) (www.palmgear.com)

    Pocket Radiologist (Has XRay, CT, MRI images of 100 common disease/trauma processes grouped by body area or age group{head, spine, chest, abdomen, pediatrics, and more} I have head and pediatrics on my system. Kind of expensive but a great reference and teaching tool) www.pocketradiologist.com

    Eponyms (Overhear a Doctor say "Bezold-Jarisch reflex" and don't know what it means, look it up here www.eponyms.net )

    Code Blue (A medical calculator, input the patients age or weight and you can calculate for RSI, ACLS, Tube sizes, Neuro drugs, and burn area calculation) www.eminnovations.com/codeblue

    Epocrates RxPro ( drug guide, allows for own notes) www.epocrates.com
    Epocrates ID ( infectious disease guide, included with the paid version of 6.0 Pro)

    Tarascon Pharmacopeia (currently in Beta test stage but I have found to be very stable. Expansion card capable which is good as it is about 2.5MB in size (same as epocrates which does not go easily if at all to expansion card. FREE for now at least, you must register with the web site. http://www.usbmis-test.com/beta/beta_test.php


    Datebook 5.0 (Best datebook upgrade, color support, icons, tie-ins with your other original apps (to, memo, address) www.pimlicosoftware.com

    Handbase (lets you make your own databases, I track our Level 1 trauma patients and my procedures (central lines, intubations, etc), upload to my PC, print out if needed for distribution or filing) http://www.ddhsoftware.com/handbase.html

    Infusicalc (Great tool for calculating drip rates for medication infusions, you can program for your hospital standards and then just plug in weight/dose and boom you have infusion rate!!! This is SO SWEET!!!!!!!)(Newest version allows for calculating a bolus and infusion withoutn having to create a new page) www.aetherpalm.com


    iSilo (Document reader, all titles below are from Yahoo medical ware groups or Palmgear or Meistermed iSilo)
    ACLS 2000
    Acid Base Disorders
    Acute Renal Failure
    Algorithm for Rash Diagnosis
    Asthma
    Cecil's Medicine Text
    Chest X-Ray Guide
    Clinical Medicine Consult 2.9
    Congenital Heart defects and repair (nice diagrams discussing defect and repairs)
    Craniofacial Trauma
    Dermatome maps
    Differential Dx
    Handbook of Drug Administration (from Australia, gives good interaction data)
    Harrison's Internal Medicine 15th Edition
    Hematology/Oncology Emergencies
    HyperTox 2003 (a good toxicology reference tool)
    Interpretation of Dx Tests
    Ishihara Color Plates
    Long QT Syndrome
    Lytemesiter
    OB Emergencies
    Physiology review
    Principles of Surgery
    Procedures in Medicine (from the makers of Clinical Medicine Consult)
    Robert's Emergency procedures
    Peds Base
    Schwartz's Textbook of Surgery
    Washington Manual of Surgery
    Washington Manual
    Will's Eye Manual
    Vanderbilt NICU Manual
    Ventilator Waveforms
    CDC STD 2002 Guidelines (The ED docs love this program, good reference tool)
    USAMRID 2001 (Bio Warfare)
    Thrombophilia
    Metabolic Syndrome
    Nerve Roots and Dermatomes
    LFT's and management
    Hemodynamic waves interp.
    Endocarditis Prophylaxis
    Coronary artery diagram (great for bedside teaching)
    APAP OD Nomogram
    A fib Tx guidelines

    EM Guide Maps (From Jeff Mann's web site converted to iSilo format, need iSilo X converter from www.isilo.com to convert web pages to iSilo format) http://emguidemaps.homestead.com/Jef...guidemaps.html
    Spinal Cord Syndromes
    Blood Transfusion Reactions
    Penetrating Neck Trauma
    Head Injury
    Concussion
    Syncope
    Blood/Fluid Exposure Protocol



    Journal To Go (A FREE journal review. Allows you to pick your subject {emergency, cardiology, peds, etc} and then gets you CURRENT abstracts from major medical journals. Very CURRENT!!!!!!!!!) www.journaltogo.com


    Riley Kidometer (BEST reference tool for bedside and emergency pediatrics)

    Medcalc (FREE) www.palmgear.com

    Medrules (FREE) www.palmgear.com

    OB Pregnancy Wheel (FREE) www.palmgear.com

    Sanford Guide (ID and antimicrobial treatment reference) www.sandfordguide.com

    TIMI Risk Calculator and Guidelines (Helps address management and predicts outcomes of patients with unstable angina, early ST elevation MI and STEMI based on current ACC guidelines)(FREE from www.timi.org)

    Apprisor (AHA/ACC Guidelines) www.mobilemedica.com
    UA/NSTEMI
    CHF
    Afib
    AMI


    Wordsmith (Document tool, lets you use Word style formatting on your Palm, very good upgrade, www.bluenomad.com)
    Using this I have created about 400 of my own helpful guides for ED care. A lot are based on flow charts from EM practice journal)
  6. by   Geeg
    I don't care how "user friendly" they are and how quick and adept the user is, it is still faster to use pen and paper. Personally, I hate electronic charting since hospitals typically buy outdated and unfriendly equipment and software. Plus, most hospitals do not have complete systems and still do part electronically and part on paper and have poor or no interfaces for other equipment, i.e. bedside monitors in icu.
  7. by   rninformatics
    Originally posted by Geeg
    I don't care how "user friendly" they are and how quick and adept the user is, it is still faster to use pen and paper. Personally, I hate electronic charting since hospitals typically buy outdated and unfriendly equipment and software. Plus, most hospitals do not have complete systems and still do part electronically and part on paper and have poor or no interfaces for other equipment, i.e. bedside monitors in icu.
    Geeg,

    You seem very knowledgable about the systems, hardware and their deficits at your facility.

    Sounds like your organization could use someone like you ( or you even) who has a good clinical foundation and knows what the end users need inorder to be able to quickly and successfully utilize health information systems. Ever thought about joining your facility's IS User Group or the IS dept? As the saying goes: "if you are not part of the solution then you are part of the problem."

    Regardless of whether or not you like electronic documentation it is here to stay and will only increase in scope and depth within all our healthcare systems.
  8. by   Mariah
    I would like to know people's experience in using PDAs for charting patient information that is integrated with a clinical information system. What you enter becomes automatically part of the patient's record and part of the legal record. What type of information do you enter such as vital signs, medication administrations, care plans, etc. What do you like or dislike about viewing patient information on the PDA as compared to a PC on the unit. What do you like or dislike about entering patient information on the PDA as compared to doing the same on a PC on the unit? What security measures/policies does you agency have in place to prevent unauthorized access to patient information from the PDA?
  9. by   MickyB-RN
    Could anyone tell me the major differences between the Palm m130 and the Palm m515? I'm looking to buy a handheld but don't really know much about them.


    Kelly
  10. by   LilRedRN1973
    The memory is more on the m515, I believe. I wrestled back and forth between the two and the reason I chose my m130 was because I read a lot of reviews that said the m515 was not as reliable as the m130. The m130 got nothing but great reviews and people who upgraded to an m515 missed their m130. I love it and with the memory card, there is plenty of space on my m130 for anything I need. And you can find PDA's really cheap on Ebay....that's where I bought mine!
  11. by   rninformatics
    Palm m515: The major difference from the m130 and the m505 are the addition of 8 MB of RAM (16MB total).

    The Palm m130 has had some bad press related to the screen size and visibility.

    Try this site for reviews, design, specs, performance and features:

    http://reviews-zdnet.com.com/Palm_m1...7.html?tag=dir

    I'd also suggest posting your questions to:

    Nursing-PDAs mailing list
    Nursing-PDAs@lists.twistedpair.ca
    http://lists.twistedpair.ca/mailman/...i/nursing-pdas






    Originally posted by KellyMarie37
    Could anyone tell me the major differences between the Palm m130 and the Palm m515? I'm looking to buy a handheld but don't really know much about them.


    Kelly
  12. by   Underbedmonster
    Hi. This is my first post, though I've been lurking for a couple of years. I've really enjoyed the sharing of knowledge on this board, and finally have a bit of my own to contribute. I just bought a Tungsten E, and while scouring the 'net for info, I found a neat discussion site through Palm's website. It's for Palm users in the medical field, and has discussion topics all over the place. The overall discussion board that the medical thread is part of has answers to tons of technical questions, too. Have fun!
    http://discussion.brighthand.com/pal...php?forumid=83
  13. by   MickyB-RN
    I found a neat discussion site through Palm's website. It's for Palm users in the medical field, and has discussion topics all over the place.>>


    Thanks! Looks like a great site to get opinions. :-)



    Kelly

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