Know hospitals that pay for school?

  1. 0 Does anyone know of decent hospitals that will pay for nursing school if you agree to work for them so many years afterward? I would be more interested in the KC area, but I'm not opposed to other areas. I wouldn't mind Springfield or Columbia.
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  3. Visit  jab3da} profile page

    About jab3da

    From 'Missouri'; 32 Years Old; Joined Aug '05; Posts: 58; Likes: 4.

    22 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  ExAirBagRN} profile page
    0
    Quote from jab3da
    Does anyone know of decent hospitals that will pay for nursing school if you agree to work for them so many years afterward? I would be more interested in the KC area, but I'm not opposed to other areas. I wouldn't mind Springfield or Columbia.
    I have been wondering the same thing......possibly call the hospital HR of choice and inquire?

    Sorry I don't have an answer for you
  5. Visit  hospitalstaph} profile page
    0
    I have heard that Excelsior Springs Hospital does but asks for a three year commitment. You would probably be better off taking out loans, three years is a LONG time if you hate the hospital that you work for.

    TL
    Last edit by hospitalstaph on Dec 22, '06
  6. Visit  Roozeyk} profile page
    0
    Quote from jab3da
    Does anyone know of decent hospitals that will pay for nursing school if you agree to work for them so many years afterward? I would be more interested in the KC area, but I'm not opposed to other areas. I wouldn't mind Springfield or Columbia.
    Cox Hospital in Springfield, MO. has a program, it doesn't pay for your whole schooling but it helps a little, and you work for them in return. Also check out the Missouri Forgiveness Loan Program, you can get some info from the state board of nursing, they allow so much money for schooling, and then you have to serve in an underprivilaged county in the state for payback.
  7. Visit  jab3da} profile page
    0
    Quote from Roozeyk
    Cox Hospital in Springfield, MO. has a program, it doesn't pay for your whole schooling but it helps a little, and you work for them in return. Also check out the Missouri Forgiveness Loan Program, you can get some info from the state board of nursing, they allow so much money for schooling, and then you have to serve in an underprivilaged county in the state for payback.
    I'll have to look into those. Thanks.
  8. Visit  Headhurt} profile page
    0
    Truman Med pays a monthly stipend and then you sign a contract with them afterwards (I think it is 1 year, I could be mistaken). Big inner city hospital...you would definitely get a lot of experience there!

    I heard Excelsior Springs is not a good place to work. I would definitely be leery of signing such a lengthly contract with any hospital.
  9. Visit  blueheaven} profile page
    0
    Veteran's Administration Hospitals (all of them) have plans that will pay for you to go to school if you agree to work in the system afterwards. You have to be employed for 1 year in the system before they will do that. Good Luck!
  10. Visit  dgclough} profile page
    0
    St. Johns Hospital out of Springfield has a program. They're affiliated with SBU university and they'll pay almost 100% of the nursing portion of classes if you'll work for them while you're going to school, they require 16 hrs or more, w/ 16 hrs on the weekends (I think). You can find info at www.sbuniv.edu and then look up nursing, you'll see a page, St. Johns College of nursing, and their scholarship program is outlined there. You do have to sign a work agreement for so many years vs so many $$, but you can buy your way out of it if you'd prefer. When I checked into it, they said it was like making a $300 car pmt a month, if you decided not to work for them...Thats where I'll be attending, starting Jan 3rd....YEAH!
  11. Visit  Josh L.Ac.} profile page
    0
    If you take the accelerated BSN at Research College of Nursing, you have the option of signing a contract that pays for the year long program in exchange for a two year contract at any HCA Midwest hospital.
  12. Visit  mom2michael} profile page
    0
    Missouri Dept. of Health has a program:

    http://www.dhss.mo.gov/LoanRepayment/index.html

    You have to work in a county of need for 4 years total regardless of how much you borrow. You can take up to $5000 per year for an ADN program. Program starts taking apps. pretty soon if you are interested. You get the money in August.

    Freeman in Joplin also offers a tuition reimbursement program. You have to pay for the program in advance though, they reimburse you after each semesters (a total of 3). You have to be a SA and agree to work 12 hours a month (usually a Sat/Sun) - then then offer this new program called the Finale program, which is an extern type program your final 6 months of school. After graduation, it's 3 years to work for them or pay them back. St. John's in Joplin also offers a very similar program with an extern type position your final semester as well.

    St John's in Springfield will offer you a plan, as long as you attend SBU. If you attend any other program you are only eligible to receive $200 a semester (or something like that).
  13. Visit  happytoheal} profile page
    0
    I'm finishing up school at Research College of Nursing in Kansas City, MO. They have a traditional and accelerated option for nursing students. Both options have a pay-back system such as the one you are asking about. It's basically referred to as the "loan forgiveness program" and it's through HCA. A traditional nursing student will go through a four year program, with 2 and 1/2 years focused on nursing specific courses. The accelerated option is for students with previous bachelor (four year) degrees. The accelerated program is one full year, and very intensive.

    With the traditional option, HCA will pay for half of your tuition as a sophomore, 3/4ths of your tuition as a junior, and full tuition your senior year. In return, you owe three years to working at an HCA hospital, preferably in the area. As an accelerated student, after one intensive year of course work, in which HCA will fully pay for, you will owe two years of work at an HCA hospital. Once you graduate from either program, you will recieve regular pay checks. The only money taken out of your pay checks during the years that you owe HCA after graduation, are taxes on the loaned out money.

    Another option is that if you graduate and move out of the area, and can not work at an HCA hospital (and have the existing loan), you will be responsible for paying back 50% of the full loan amount within one year after graduation. You can pay partial amounts, or pay the full amount at once.

    This program is through HCA pairing up with Research College of Nursing. There are some other great schools in the area that have the same kind of program, but this is the one I know so much about, because I'm in the program now. I love Research College! The classes are small, and teachers are incredible student advocates. We have students of all age, and although nursing school can be a tough transition, I have loved being a student there!

    Good luck on your quest for a good school!!!!!!
  14. Visit  RN2BE2009} profile page
    0
    I just learned today that if you attend school at St Lukes in Kansas City, and you sign a two year agreement to work night shift in select units they will pay for a portion, but I am not sure how much. It may be worth looking into....

    Good Luck!
  15. Visit  Josh L.Ac.} profile page
    0
    Quote from happytoheal
    I'm finishing up school at Research College of Nursing in Kansas City, MO. They have a traditional and accelerated option for nursing students. Both options have a pay-back system such as the one you are asking about. It's basically referred to as the "loan forgiveness program" and it's through HCA. A traditional nursing student will go through a four year program, with 2 and 1/2 years focused on nursing specific courses. The accelerated option is for students with previous bachelor (four year) degrees. The accelerated program is one full year, and very intensive.

    With the traditional option, HCA will pay for half of your tuition as a sophomore, 3/4ths of your tuition as a junior, and full tuition your senior year. In return, you owe three years to working at an HCA hospital, preferably in the area. As an accelerated student, after one intensive year of course work, in which HCA will fully pay for, you will owe two years of work at an HCA hospital. Once you graduate from either program, you will recieve regular pay checks. The only money taken out of your pay checks during the years that you owe HCA after graduation, are taxes on the loaned out money.

    Another option is that if you graduate and move out of the area, and can not work at an HCA hospital (and have the existing loan), you will be responsible for paying back 50% of the full loan amount within one year after graduation. You can pay partial amounts, or pay the full amount at once.

    This program is through HCA pairing up with Research College of Nursing. There are some other great schools in the area that have the same kind of program, but this is the one I know so much about, because I'm in the program now. I love Research College! The classes are small, and teachers are incredible student advocates. We have students of all age, and although nursing school can be a tough transition, I have loved being a student there!

    Good luck on your quest for a good school!!!!!!

    I start the accelerated BSN in August 06 at Research so I am curious to hear about your experience. If that is okay, we can start another thread or we can do it via PM.


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