Talc Powder in ICU

  1. Have there been any definite negatives on the use of Talc powder on patients in ICU? This especially applies to Vented and trached patients.
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   Dana
    I have never heard of a concrete reason why talc shouldn't be used. Even if a pt. is trached or on the vent, the talc is used where it shouldn't be a problem for the pt.
  4. by   Janet Barclay
    We stopped using talc in our General Systems ICU six years ago due to problem relating to skin care. Specifically, the talc turns into grains of "sand" when the patients are diaphoretic.
  5. by   iamme8557
    I dont use powder directly on patients but will powder the draw sheet at times to keep patient feeling "fresh". In trauma ICU many of patients go back to surgery numerous times and the surgeons hate trying to remove the powder in the OR
    Deanna
  6. by   bahamagirl
    We don't use powder but we just got powder that comes in liquid form. When you apply it, it turns into powder but it does not turn grainy. It is a fan favorite in our unit.
  7. by   steelydanfan
    I know this thread is old, but here goes..
    Talc was deemed out of favor because of chemical components that were deemed to be carcinogenic.
    However, cornstarch has the same drying properties as talc, without the chemicals.
    If it can be used without causing airborne particulates, (rub on, rather than sprinkle), I think it is an excellent agent for moisture absorbtion and friction reduction.
    Any thoughts?
  8. by   Mags4711
    Never on my patients.

    Though I agree if one feels the need to use something (not on me or my family, please), corn starch is a *much* better choice.

    I have seen powders become those little grains of sand, as well as larger clumps that cause breakdown. I cringe when I see people put it in SCD's! Eeeeek!!!
  9. by   Jolie
    Quote from cateccrn
    I know this thread is old, but here goes..
    Talc was deemed out of favor because of chemical components that were deemed to be carcinogenic.
    However, cornstarch has the same drying properties as talc, without the chemicals.
    If it can be used without causing airborne particulates, (rub on, rather than sprinkle), I think it is an excellent agent for moisture absorbtion and friction reduction.
    Any thoughts?

    The use of talc in the perineal area has been linked to ovarian cancer in women.
  10. by   SorenDrake
    Anyone have any research/practice based studies to corroborate??
  11. by   suebird3
    i remember from my first vent case that the md had stated that talc is an irritant, and not to be used around trachs. can cause further problems.

    suebird
  12. by   steelydanfan
    I believe that is what I stated in my original post, talc is bad!.
    And Faith MD is right when she states that overuse is worse than no use at all. NO sprinkle, only rub on.
  13. by   rninme
    None in ICU....not sure if they even use it on the floors???
  14. by   dfk
    Quote from iamme8557
    I dont use powder directly on patients but will powder the draw sheet at times to keep patient feeling "fresh". In trauma ICU many of patients go back to surgery numerous times and the surgeons hate trying to remove the powder in the OR
    Deanna

    ummm... if u put it on the draw sheet, wont it still get on the pt??

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