ICU: Finding the best way to care - page 2

by Liddle Noodnik Guide

7,641 Unique Views | 20 Comments

Nursing is a daunting task for many of us, even when we have time under our belt. Call bells, charting, phones ringing, family members needing time and reassurance, doctors returning calls; and then there is the patient, if... Read More


  1. 2
    Thank you guys for your comments! My ICU experience was some time ago but it was so exciting and gratifying. I will never forget many of the patients, nurses, and situations ... some heartbreaking, but most very satisfying!
    CountyRat and mds1 like this.
  2. 0
    I loved reading every bit of this . I just completed my final placement on ICU and it was like heaven compared to my previous placements. I felt like I grew more in that semester than I had throughout the whole four years of schooling. There's endless opportunities to learn and apply your skills. I find the nursing team works so well together to help one another out. It's an amazing floor and definitely the unit that I hope to work on one day! Thanks for sharing
  3. 0
    Quote from Bodybyvi12
    Great,
    help full thing, everyone benefited to read this.
    Body By Vi
    Where can we report this, this is advertisement !!!!!
  4. 0
    Great article! Ah! My dream job! I worked as an ICU Tech for a year and a half while in Nursing School, then landed my first full-time RN job at a crazy busy Med-Surg floor. With up to 7 patients as a new nurse, I can't even remember my patients' first names off the top of my head, let alone their medical issues or their latest vitals. If I had the time, I would read through each patient's chart and medical history to understand the pathophysiology of their illnesses. I would take the time to TEACH my patients and families about their condition. I would love to know the ins-and -outs of my patients. I would love to work as an ICU nurse some day....

    I'm only 5 months into my nursing career. Believe me, I have very much to learn still, but could any of you offer any advice for a path to ICU RN for me?
  5. 0
    Quote from heron21
    Great article! Ah! My dream job! I worked as an ICU Tech for a year and a half while in Nursing School, then landed my first full-time RN job at a crazy busy Med-Surg floor. With up to 7 patients as a new nurse, I can't even remember my patients' first names off the top of my head, let alone their medical issues or their latest vitals. If I had the time, I would read through each patient's chart and medical history to understand the pathophysiology of their illnesses. I would take the time to TEACH my patients and families about their condition. I would love to know the ins-and -outs of my patients. I would love to work as an ICU nurse some day....

    I'm only 5 months into my nursing career. Believe me, I have very much to learn still, but could any of you offer any advice for a path to ICU RN for me?
    I would recommend talking with the ICU/CCU director/clinical coordinator regarding transfer to the department. As a Critical Care Tech for almost 9 years now and also a nursing student (graduate may 2014) I've already inquired about working in the dept and I've been told that I would have to work on telemetry for about 6 months then transfer to IMCU for a few months and then I can transfer to CCU, all within a year. Good luck and best wishes.
  6. 0
    Well written keep up the good work!
  7. 1
    Quote from Sun0408
    Where can we report this, this is advertisement !!!!!
    It looks like someone reported it, thanks Sun!
    Sun0408 likes this.
  8. 1
    This is just awesome, I went from a volunteer EMT to brand new grad in our Medical/Cardiac ICU straight out of school, and I can mirror many of these feelings.....beautifully written!
    Liddle Noodnik likes this.
  9. 0
    This was a great article. I worked the floors for four years. I worked in General Surgery, medicine, and oncoloy. I had 11 patients at one point on the general surgery floor. I had a manager who demanded report from each night nurse individually. One morning I told her, "I am sorry. I cannot give you report because I do not know any of these patients." Floor nursing is great in a sense because it is very important. Floor nurses are treated terribly because we are portrayed as glorified waitresses and "pill givers" since the patients are "stable." IF they were stable, they'd be home. 11 patients consists of a patient on a heparin drip, a patient with blood transfusing, a patient with constant bladder irrigation, a patient on PCA morphine, a patient on IV antibiotics with tube feedings, a patient who is trached with need for constant suctioning, a patient post op with a fresh below the knee amputation, a confused patient who wants to jump over the hand rails, a patient on Ativan/ CIWA protocol who is in alcohol withdrawl, and the list is endless. For extra fun, a patient could code or decompensate and need to be transferred to the ICU or to the morgue! We also cannot forget admissions, discharges, and transfers.

    I now work in ICU because I was bored on the floors even though I loved patient care. I also despised nursing administration as they have ZERO reguard for the hard work that floor nurses do. Even the public think that floor nurses aren't as "skilled" as ICU nurses. I remember floating to the floor from the ICU and I was assigned a patient that I had in the ICU that was trasferred to the floor. The patient's husband asked me, "I thought you were an ICU nurse. I thought you were higher than here." ICU nurses are notr superior to floor nurses. Having two patients and being in control is outstanding in the ICU but it is a different setting than the floor. Ask any ICU nurse and they will never go to the floor because the patient load is overwhelming as people who are hospitalized these days are indeed very sick. Outpatient procedures are more common today than 20 years ago because of the advances in medicine.

    Nursing is rewarding, backbreaking, exhausting, and amazing all at the same time. The minute you hate it, you have to leave!
  10. 0
    Liddle ... a very inspiring account of passionate discovery ... hope my experience is similar as I soon will be starting the Critical Care journey.

    ... Alan.


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