Unsafe Assignment & Pt Abandonment - page 2

by GM2RN 3,484 Views | 13 Comments

Good Morning Everyone I work in the ED for a hospital in Michigan, and like many other hospitals these days, mine has been forcing nurses to work under-staffed for quite some time. Not every day, but often enough that I'm... Read More


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    Quote from morte
    The Powers That Be.....

    LOL Thanks
  2. 1
    I'm not sure where you work. But it's not like that everywhere. I work on a very busy surgical unit. Days usually has 4 patients, but no more than 6. Midnights usually has 5 patients, but no more than 6. But, we are an acuity adaptable hospital. Which means, there are times that we have drips on our floor. We not only get some cardiac drips, but we also get all of the Insulin drips in the hospital. But in all honesty, in rarely happens. And even when we don't have the drips, we still only have 4 patient's on days. Which makes for a really really long 12 hours.
    nurse.sandi likes this.
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    What is the unsafe patient ratio? There may be consequences with your employer if you refuse. I refused an assignment before on the stepdown unit and made the manager take an assignment. Needless to say after that I was on the bad gal list. It is scary to be in the situation you are in. I have heard horror stories of emergency room nurses. Good luck.
    Since, MI does not have patient ratio laws like Cali...there really is not much we can do...unless we rally Lansing.
  4. 0
    Quote from GM2RN
    Good Morning Everyone

    I work in the ED for a hospital in Michigan, and like many other hospitals these days, mine has been forcing nurses to work under-staffed for quite some time. Not every day, but often enough that I'm sick of letting it continue and I'm trying to figure out how to effectively protest while doing what I can to protect my license and my job.

    I've been trying to get information about my rights to refuse an unsafe patient assignment, and what constitutes patient abandonment. If I worked on the floor I wouldn't have a problem, but working in the ED makes me less certain of how these two issues work.

    I called the Bureau of Health Professions this morning, and the short version of my story is that since Michigan has no NPA, they couldn't help me. The person that I spoke with referred me to an individual that licenses hospitals, thinking that he could give me some answers, but I had to leave a VM for that person and haven't heard back from him yet.

    Do any of you know the answers to my questions or where I can get this information?

    Thanks.
    Every state is different.

    In my state, you are not legally responsible for a patient until you receive report or if it is a new patient, perform the triage for admission.

    Until one or the other happens, if you refuse to take a patient, it is not abandonment.

    Just TELLING you a patient is yours, should not constitute "accepting" of the patient.


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