Nursing teachers

  1. Does anyone have any idea as to how one becomes a nursing teacher? Im doing pre reqs for the nursing program at wayne county right now. Im hoping to start the program by jan 08. Once im done with all that I plan on going on to wayne state for a bachelors. I am curious as to pay and schooling of nursing teachers. Anything would be helpful. Thanks in advance.
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   charebec65
    In Ohio there are many nursing instructors who are doing so on a BSN. I think the OBON is now requiring that nursing instructors be working on their master's degree in order to keep teaching. From what I understand, many of these instructors are taking a pretty significant pay cut to teach.
  4. by   juan de la cruz
    Are you asking about teaching in a nursing program? I've seen clinical instructors in community colleges with a BSN as their highest nursing degree. I taught at a SE Michigan community college for a semester 2 years ago. Most instructors in that particular college are hired part-time to teach clinicals and nursing lab courses. They do have a handful of full-time faculty (no more than 15) and they are all educated at the master's degree level.

    Two years ago when I taught at a community college, part-time clinical instructors were paid hourly and the rate was somewhere in the mid to high 30/hour. This was based on years of experience as a nurse, specialty certifications, and highest degree attained. I have asked a few people in this field and found that this was the norm in community colleges at the time. I never found out how much their full time faculty earn.

    Universities such as Wayne and U of M have higher educational requirements for faculty members. To earn the rank of a professor, associate professor, or assistant professor, an earned doctorate is required. Lecturers and clinical instructors are required to have at least an MS degree in nursing.
  5. by   rntoben2008
    Quote from pinoyNP
    Are you asking about teaching in a nursing program? I've seen clinical instructors in community colleges with a BSN as their highest nursing degree. I taught at a SE Michigan community college for a semester 2 years ago. Most instructors in that particular college are hired part-time to teach clinicals and nursing lab courses. They do have a handful of full-time faculty (no more than 15) and they are all educated at the master's degree level.

    Two years ago when I taught at a community college, part-time clinical instructors were paid hourly and the rate was somewhere in the mid to high 30/hour. This was based on years of experience as a nurse, specialty certifications, and highest degree attained. I have asked a few people in this field and found that this was the norm in community colleges at the time. I never found out how much their full time faculty earn.

    Universities such as Wayne and U of M have higher educational requirements for faculty members. To earn the rank of a professor, associate professor, or assistant professor, an earned doctorate is required. Lecturers and clinical instructors are required to have at least an MS degree in nursing.

    At my college all Nursing Instructor's must have their MSN in Nursing. It is a community college with the 2 year degree program, I believe in the state of Michigan "all" teachers that are certified through the state must obtain their Master's degree in X amount of time. My mom is a retired school teacher, and I know they were making her co-workers finish their MSN. I am thinking this would apply to college's as well.

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