Didn't get in at U of M. Need advice.

  1. I applied to U of M 2nd degree program. I have been taking pre-reqs for about 2 yrs (work full time so can only take 2 classes a semester). Had to take all the sciences - gen. biol, gen chem, A&P I and II, Biochem, Microbiol, Nutrition, and I took an intermed. algebra. I got 4.0 in all of them. But I still didn't get into U of M - not even on the waiting list. I know they take about 50 into the program a yr and they have 24 on their waiting list. I'm kind of feeling down right now. I was thinking of asking them why I didn't make it. I would like to know. All they say in the letter is you didn't make it. Any advice from anyone?
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  2. 17 Comments

  3. by   rntoben2008
    Try Wayne State University, keep your head up and keep trying. I did not get in to my program on the first try, but the second time I did. Do not give up.
  4. by   Dabuggy
    That is a well known school world wide and a lot of politics are involved. If you know of a doctor that has graduated from UM, ask if he will give you a letter of referral. Also, great job on the 4.0, I wonder how many people with 4.0 like yourself were denied? 2,000 maybe more. I have an instructor who went to a CC and got her RN, them went on to get her BSN from UM. You never know what tomorrow will bring.

    Dabuggy
  5. by   mvanz9999
    Quote from thyme39
    I applied to U of M 2nd degree program. I have been taking pre-reqs for about 2 yrs (work full time so can only take 2 classes a semester). Had to take all the sciences - gen. biol, gen chem, A&P I and II, Biochem, Microbiol, Nutrition, and I took an intermed. algebra. I got 4.0 in all of them. But I still didn't get into U of M - not even on the waiting list. I know they take about 50 into the program a yr and they have 24 on their waiting list. I'm kind of feeling down right now. I was thinking of asking them why I didn't make it. I would like to know. All they say in the letter is you didn't make it. Any advice from anyone?
    They are legally required to keep the reason you were denied in your application file, and are also legally obligated to disclose the reason to you. If you want to find out, I would suggest you call admissions and ask. In my experience, they've been very nice. They will likely be very helpful in suggesting ways to improve your application the following year.

    The "reason" may be total BS, but it's better than nothing at all.

    Lots of people don't get in on the first try, so they try again. Just make sure you do something new before your next application. Volunteering and things like that....
  6. by   UMichSCN07
    I didn't get into the UM Second Career program my first try, I called and asked them why I didn't get in and it was a simple, stupid reason that I had overlooked on the application instructions (I had out-of-state classes to satisfy most of my prereqs and I neglected to send in syllabi for them). Second time around, I got in, no problems. For what it's worth, letters of recommendation don't help, because they don't ask for them. Applying early doesn't make a difference, because they wait until the deadline and look at all of the applications at once. For what it's worth, I worked part-time in EMS in the intervening year and went and got my paramedic license (already had my EMT-Specialist for several years). Definitely reapply next year, they definitely notice persistence. I just finished the first semester of the program, feel free to PM me if you have any questions.

    Mike in Michigan
    U-Michigan Second Career BSN Class of 2007
  7. by   Dabuggy
    I disagree with that. If you know the right people you can get in anywhere providing you have a decent GPA. A doctor I know makes major contributions to a university. He got my nephew in. My nephew does happen to date his daughter, so that was a plus for him. If you have the right letter of recommendation I believe you can get in anywhere, and it certainly will not hurt the applicant.

    Dabuggy
  8. by   nurselizk
    They told me that recommendations DO make a difference even though they aren't required. I disagree that who you know makes a difference. It's not that kind of a program--this is a highly competitive program that only takes a small percentage of applicants. A high percentage of the applicants would do just fine in the program but there simply isn't enough room. You must have every i dotted and t crossed in your application. Your application must prove that you have what it takes. The most qualified (on paper) get interviews. Then it's up to you to impress the interviewer.
  9. by   Dabuggy
    Ok, we agree that we disagree. The doctor I know owns a few cancer research labs, and has donated a significant amount of money to a major university, and I believe they have a building there named after him. I would bet if he said he wanted a student to go to that school that that student would be the first on the roster. I could be wrong, but what I have found out in life is that money does talk. I am open minded and I could be wrong. This is in support of my statement of, it may be who you know.

    Dabuggy
  10. by   UMichSCN07
    OK, maybe time to qualify my statements... in my experience, having gone through the application process twice for this specific program, they do not ask for letters of recommendation. And further in my experience, any additional materials that are submitted with an application that are not requested get put in the trash. I'm sure that some maneuvering "behind the scenes" happens and may, in fact, make a difference; however, that's a dicey way to try to get into a school. Better to have a solid background and prerequisites and make sure that your application is properly completed (including, in this specific case, having written the appropriate essays) in a timely manner.

    Also, I might add that the application process keeps changing for this program as the program itself evolves. The first time I applied, I was called in for an interview, because they were interviewing all qualified applicants. The second time I applied, they were only interviewing those applicants whose applications needed some clarification, or certain applicants at the discretion of the dirctor of the program. I did not interview, but I was accepted. I cannot speak directly to this year's application process, but I do know, from speaking to my instructors and the Second Career staff, they are doing some phone interviews.

    Mike in Michigan
  11. by   mvanz9999
    i have to agree with umichscn07. letter's of recommendation are not that important. in fact, i know some schools that no longer accept letters of recommendation. they say the reason is that they are meaningless. who is going to write you a bad letter of recommendation, and if they are likely to write a bad letter, would you really use them?

    knowing someone who can pull strings because they are a major donor, or have buildings named after them - that is not the same as getting a letter of reference from someone.

    if you are the nephew of the president of college, you'll likely get in. but that is due to personal contact, not a letter. i think all schools should end the silly letter of reference nonsense, because they are quite meaningless.
  12. by   Dabuggy
    Ok, point taken. I think you underestimate the power of Physicians. The point is that, this person is looking for a way to get into the university. It sure would not hurt to have this letter. If it goes in the trash then the applicant tried. No HARM in that is there.

    Dabuggy
  13. by   Epona
    I would have to throw in my 2 cents here and add that letters of recommendation certainly don't hurt. Both schools I applied to I got in. Neither of them asked for LOR, but I had two of my doctors write one anyway and attached it to the application. I also wrote a letter on my own with the application stating WHY I would make a good nurse and why I would be an asset their school. Again, this was not required, but I wanted to present myself in the best possible light. Do everything you can to put your best foot forward. I feel blessed to have gotten into the schools. I have heard RN is getting pretty competitive to get into. I am very sorry to the OP that after ALL YOUR HARD work you did not get in. Yes... that must be very disappointing. Hang in there thought and get your letters in and write one yourself.... it won't hurt!! Epona
  14. by   Dabuggy
    Thank you for that reply. I did not want to give another response here because it involves my ex and her son. Thats a can of worms that I don't want to open. I did sent the OP the basics in a personal email. The referral/reference worked for him. MONEY does talk and many Physicians support their former universities. You know it has too, why do so many Physicians children get accepted??

    Dabuggy

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