What am I doing wrong?

  1. 0
    I am a male nursing student about to graduate in a few weeks.

    I have a 3.3 GPA, strong letters of recommendation from every instructor, a well demonstrated strong work ethic, get along very well with everyone, etc but I cannot find a job.

    Not even a nibble.

    No one Ive spoken to seems interested whatsoever in hiring me.


    When I did my preceptorship, I was told by over a dozen nurses to apply for that department. They told me I was the person they would want to work with, etc.

    I took a resume to the department manager and she seemed completely disinterested in me.

    She told me they had no openings, although I already knew they were about to have several due to imminent transfers.

    That encounter with her was from my viewpoint so negative, that when I got back from lunch I found myself checking the wastebaskets for my resume.


    I have asked for advice from several people and the general consensus is it isn't what you know, or how you work, but who you know.

    From talking to the other students in my class, in every case where one of them has a job offer, or is going to interviews, they knew someone (by their own admission) who go the ball rolling for them.


    I knew financially it would be hard to get through nursing school, but I did it.

    I just don't want to be sitting here waiting on a call in three months. I want to be working.



    Any constructive advice would be greatly appreciated.
    Last edit by masek77 on Apr 19, '11
  2. 14 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I applied to 18 hospitals. Heard from two - one being where I teched for 1.5 years and it wasn't even in the area I was interested in.

    Just keep trying, keep applying and prepare for your interviews. Dress nice, talk to others applying, know how to answer questions, etc.

    Jobs are tough right now. A lot of hospitals aren't even hiring. I hate saying it, but when you have hundreds of people applying to 10-15 you have to blow them out of the water..... Or know someone. I'll admit it, I pulled the "who you know card" as well- luckily I didn't need to use it.
  4. 0
    Quote from masek77
    I am a male nursing student about to graduate in a few weeks.

    I have a 3.3 GPA, strong letters of recommendation from every instructor, a well demonstrated strong work ethic, get along very well with everyone, etc but I cannot find a job.

    Not even a nibble.

    No one Ive spoken to seems interested whatsoever in hiring me.


    When I did my preceptorship, I was told by over a dozen nurses to apply for that department. They told me I was the person they would want to work with, etc.

    I took a resume to the department manager and she seemed completely disinterested in me.

    She told me they had no openings, although I already knew they were about to have several due to imminent transfers.

    That encounter with her was from my viewpoint so negative, that when I got back from lunch I found myself checking the wastebaskets for my resume.


    I have asked for advice from several people and the general consensus is it isn't what you know, or how you work, but who you know.

    From talking to the other students in my class, in every case where one of them has a job offer, or is going to interviews, they knew someone (by their own admission) who go the ball rolling for them.


    I knew financially it would be hard to get through nursing school, but I did it.

    I just don't want to be sitting here waiting on a call in three months. I want to be working.



    Any constructive advice would be greatly appreciated.
    What kind of degree do you have ? Associates or Bach? It may also depend on your location as well. There are TONS of openings in nearby hospitals where I live.
  5. 0
    "Knowing someone" isn't helping here, if it makes you feel better. I am in the same boat as you - great gpa, great references, etc., but I feel unwanted as well

    It is so hard to stay positive in these situations, just please know that you aren't alone :redpinkhe
  6. 0
    I have several friends whom i graduated with who are still looking for a job. I was lucky and got a got as a tech in the ER at my hospital and was hired in as a RN. My clinical instructor knew the ER manager. The manager told me straight up she wont hire anyone without a reference. Unfortunatly this seems to be true. But like the poster above said just keep trying and go into each managers office with a positive attitude and a resume.

    One question: Are you trying different types of units or are you looking for something specific?
  7. 0
    I had a hard time getting a job after my previous employer closed. I applied in November 2011 to a place where I knew they were hiring. My interview went well until I said these magic words...."I am looking to work 3-11 as I am taking courses to get into the RN program." Well, I got, "We have a strict orientation process and if you go to classes then you can't work here". I called them back at the beginning of January and heard from a friend of mine that I was labeled as a "not good fit" for this place. I wrote a letter stating that I dropped out of school and was available to do the orientation. I then find out that since I was labeled "not a good fit" I didn't get the job. Long story short, once the lady who interviewed me retired, I reapplied for a third time and finally was given the opportunity to work there. I have been working there since August 2012.
  8. 0
    My interview went well until I said these magic words...."I am looking to work 3-11 as I am taking courses to get into the RN program." Well, I got, "We have a strict orientation process and if you go to classes then you can't work here".
    As someone who has conducted more than my share of interviews, I can honestly tell you that the interview is not the place to express your personal wants or needs. Employers are looking for people who are interested in meeting their needs. If you start laying down conditions from the beginning, you are (a) assuming that they are going to offer you a job, and (b) telling them that they need to meet your needs first. If I am interviewing, in most cases I am looking to fill a specific position that has a specific schedule. I am very sorry if it isn't your preferred shift or days off, but that is where we have a vacancy. It may seem cold on the surface, but if I granted every employee everything they wanted, we would have no night shift and the facility would be shut down on weekends and holidays. I must staff a 24-7 operation.

    When you begin imposing restrictions on a prospective employer during the interview, you create the perception that what you want is more important to you than the job you are interviewing for. It is best to go through the interview without mentioning your personal wants, then decline the job if an offer is made and you decide that you can't live with the conditions of employment.

    As an alternative, ask the employer what their needs are (shift, days off, etc.). Don't react to the answer, even if you find it totally distasteful. If they ask you what your impression is, simply say "I would consider it." If they offer the position and you decline, explain your reasons at that time. You stand a much better chance of getting a callback for a position that more closely meets your needs because you considered theirs. A lot of getting hired is the impression you make. In essence, you are selling youself and your services, and the more attractive you can make yourself to an employer, the better your chances of success.

    We interviewed RNs a couple of months ago, and one applicant told us what his availability was - including shift and days off. He immediately went into the discard pile. That told us that he is inflexible, what we needed made no difference to him, and in all likelihood he was working a second full time job that we weren't supposed to interfere with.
    Last edit by Orca on Dec 11, '12
  9. 1
    I'm also a male nurse. The fact is some women hate you because you are a man. They will hate you even more if you are independent and good looking. I've dealt with these little anklebiters for over 10 years and they are all the same.
    RegMurse12 likes this.
  10. 0
    3 months? It took my cousins 8-10 months to find a job... and it was a 'casual' position. I'm a Nursing student, so finding employment after I graduate some times crosses my mind. I noticed though, if you look through the forums here it's pretty common for a new graduate to have some difficulty finding a job right away depending where you live... but eventually those people will land a job in no time. It's the matter of applying everywhere... and being patient.
  11. 5
    Quote from Ashen
    The fact is some women hate you because you are a man. They will hate you even more if you are independent and good looking.
    You forgot "modest".
    RL36, PrinceCharming, DeBerham, and 2 others like this.


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