Study in australia or america

  1. I am an asian male who is interested in a second degree in nursing. My first degree (bachelor and masters) was in computer science.

    I researched quite a bit on a few universities in both australia and america (US). It seems that the cost of living plus tuition fees is cheaper in australia than america for an international student. Furthermore, australia has a lower exchange rate.

    My first choice is to do a nursing degree in america but due to costs, I am forced to study in australia.

    My question is, after I have completed my studies in australia and maybe work one or two years there, would america recognise my australian bachelor degree if i take and pass the NCLEX-RN test in america ?
    Last edit by xng on Dec 14, '05
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    Quote from xng
    I am an asian male who is interested in a second degree in nursing. My first degree (bachelor and masters) was in computer science.

    I researched quite a bit on a few universities in both australia and america (US). It seems that the cost of living plus tuition fees is cheaper in australia than america for an international student. Furthermore, australia has a lower exchange rate.

    My first choice is to do a nursing degree in america but due to costs, I am forced to study in australia.

    My question is, after I have completed my studies in australia and maybe work one or two years there, would america recognise my australian bachelor degree if i take and pass the NCLEX-RN test in america ?

    Anybody have similar experience ? Does anybody know the differences between working as a male nurse in america and australia ?
    If you do the research here, you will find that you will have make-up classes to do to meet the requirements for licensure in the US. If your goal is to work in the US, then I do not suggest going to Australai to go to school first. Working as a nurse, whether male or not, is quite similar between the two countries.

    In order for the degree to be recognized here, it must be at least a two year program. Currently, any of the accelerated programs from other countries are not accepted here. Same as for the accelerated degrees for the Amernicans, they are currently not accpeted in most other countries.
  4. by   xng
    Quote from suzanne4
    If you do the research here, you will find that you will have make-up classes to do to meet the requirements for licensure in the US. If your goal is to work in the US, then I do not suggest going to Australai to go to school first. Working as a nurse, whether male or not, is quite similar between the two countries.

    In order for the degree to be recognized here, it must be at least a two year program. Currently, any of the accelerated programs from other countries are not accepted here. Same as for the accelerated degrees for the Amernicans, they are currently not accpeted in most other countries.
    I would like to study in america but I don't have sufficient funds.
    It is a 2 years program but it is accelerated compared to a normal 3 years program.

    Wonder why they are not accepted in america as long as we can pass the nurse registration test.
  5. by   chadlie
    hi Suzanne! I am also planning to study in Australia. I am a newly registered nurse in Philippines and planning to have a 2-year vocational course of community nursing. I heard that I need to have a bank account existing more than 6 months. How true is this? do they do background checking? thanks!
  6. by   jammin246RN
    I find it interesting that you say it is more expensive to study in America.... It all depends on where you study. For example if you go to a community college (like my father did to become a nurse) you are looking at tuition of around $5,000 a year for 2 years. That would be the out of country price. Also you can find lodging for around $450 a month, even $250 a month if you share a house with someone. Food is not very expensive if you shop at Aldi's ($100 a month will have you eating good). As an added bonus many hospitals recognize a nurse in training as a CNA and a path in the door for a job once you graduate. Standard pay for CNAs or Student Nurses is $10 an hour, many hospitals will even pay for your schooling if you commit to work for them for 2 years. So not only are you making $360 a week (covering all expenses), your school is free. Also you have an assured job once you graduate.
  7. by   Silverdragon102
    Quote from jammin246RN
    I find it interesting that you say it is more expensive to study in America.... It all depends on where you study. For example if you go to a community college (like my father did to become a nurse) you are looking at tuition of around $5,000 a year for 2 years. That would be the out of country price. Also you can find lodging for around $450 a month, even $250 a month if you share a house with someone. Food is not very expensive if you shop at Aldi's ($100 a month will have you eating good). As an added bonus many hospitals recognize a nurse in training as a CNA and a path in the door for a job once you graduate. Standard pay for CNAs or Student Nurses is $10 an hour, many hospitals will even pay for your schooling if you commit to work for them for 2 years. So not only are you making $360 a week (covering all expenses), your school is free. Also you have an assured job once you graduate.
    However if not a citizen of the country or a Permanent resident then fees can be higher and I believe this can be the same if you are an out of state student.

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