So..You're going to be a MALE nurse? - page 3

I was out having drinks with some friends, some new guy was sitting with us...kinda jerky. With about 6 if us sitting at a table he asked me what I'm going to school for. I told him I'm in... Read More

  1. by   aculwell
    Whenever I've been called doctor or asked if I was a doctor I always reply "Nope, I work for a living"
  2. by   IWANT2BEEANRN
    These responses are great! But, what I find really interesting is the response that I receive from some of the females in school. I often wonder if they (females) actually think about what they are are about to say before they speak the words.
  3. by   cosadorn
    It's not uncommon in the ER to have all male nurses on a shift. The kicker is that the female doc we work with wears a pin that says "I'm the doctor. He's the nurse." I tell my patients who get hung up on the male thing that on my way to med school, I realized that if I wanted to make the decisions AND provide the care at the bedside, I needed to be a nurse. And I agree, I never say "just" a nurse, too self depricating.
  4. by   antidote
    Semi-long post alert!

    This is something I really don't get too me that much. It doesn't affect me tremendously personally (emotionally) but I would really just wish people would look at us the same. We learn just as much, and are most likely just as capable!

    One thing I will never forget though; around the middle of May of last year, I was the assigned nurse for an older female patient (this happened to be on a week I wasn't in the ICU) who was in the hospital for pneum -algia (mixed terms - breathing pain... when she inhaled she complained of severe chest pressure). In any case...

    After the CNA's got her situated, hooked up to the ECG, etc. I came in to introduce myself and the NA working with me. After I introduced myself and my title, she quickly said "You're my nurse!?". I replied to her confirming that. She than, had a fit and began screaming "I don't want any made-up male nurses touching me... the Lord did not intend for such things! Get out of my room right now!!!".

    Since I've never had this happen before I wasn't really sure what to do. I told her "Alright, I'll just go ahead and find a new nurse." I heard her mumble something as I left the room (probably 'you better!'). Anyways let me speed this up. The nurse took care of her for about 2 days. The lady then got sick of her, then it was my turn! Right when I came in her room, she started up again.

    Well, I was still in shock (since I thought she'd be offer that since some of the CNA's were male and she had no problem with it!... weird lady huh?). I got tired of it and started explaining to her that I am just as capable, willing and knowledgeable as all of the female nurses. After about 10 minutes of standing up for myself, she glanced over at her IV and said "Its getting low! Gonna change it?".

    Definitely an interest pt. huh? But for the most part, I have no major problem with it.
  5. by   holanurse
    i'm just starting to study towards a BSN. the whole 'male' nurse thing has occupied my mind a little. i started thinking maybe instead of nurse, people could use some generic term like 'hospital worker' or 'health worker'. it makes me think of 'flight attendant' which used to be strictly 'stewardess', and changed because of males in that profession. i have traveled a lot and lived abroad before (peace corps volunteer), and in some languages, for instance Dutch, the word for nurse tranlates as 'sister'. so it would be a little awkward telling my Dutch speaking friends that i'm now studying to become a 'sister'...
    but really, i think it's getting to the point were there are many males in the profession, and it's not such a big deal nowadays...
    anyway, just thought i'd put in my two cents.
  6. by   nursemike
    Quote from holanurse
    i'm just starting to study towards a BSN. the whole 'male' nurse thing has occupied my mind a little. i started thinking maybe instead of nurse, people could use some generic term like 'hospital worker' or 'health worker'. it makes me think of 'flight attendant' which used to be strictly 'stewardess', and changed because of males in that profession. i have traveled a lot and lived abroad before (peace corps volunteer), and in some languages, for instance Dutch, the word for nurse tranlates as 'sister'. so it would be a little awkward telling my Dutch speaking friends that i'm now studying to become a 'sister'...
    but really, i think it's getting to the point were there are many males in the profession, and it's not such a big deal nowadays...
    anyway, just thought i'd put in my two cents.
    Alternative titles were discussed on a prior thread...sorry, I don't remember which one...and many of us were content to stick with "nurse." I don't recall whether there was a consensus on this, but I still think it's a good title, taking nurse as "to nurture" rather than "to breastfeed."

    I don't think "sister" would fly in the US even among female nurses, since we have a predominantly Protestant population and nurses aren't typically nuns. Then again, I can think of Protestant denominatons wherein members often address each other as "Brother _____ " and "Sister _____."
    I'm not meaning to discount the contributions of religious orders--male and female--to nursing, but given the diversity of beliefs in this country, the more secular title, "Nurse," does seem more appropriate, to me.
  7. by   newnurse36
    a nurse (origin late middle english : contraction of earlier nourice, from old french, from late latin nutricia, feminine of latin nutricius '(person) that nourishes,' from nutrix, nutric- 'nurse', from nutrire 'nourish'. the verb was originally a contraction of nourish , altered under the influence of the noun.[1])
    Last edit by newnurse36 on Feb 26, '07
  8. by   Sean 91
    Not to sound elite, but remember, 25% of the American population still don't have a college degree (29.4 for men, 26.1 women per Google search). And the average reading level is still 6th Grade--in fact, in nursing school they told us to write for that level when giving instructions to patients. So many of these people do not have an idea about many things, except what was on t.v. last night. But I run into comments only 2% of the time--so just let it wash off.

    - RN
  9. by   norseman
    In Sweden there has been talks about changing the name of the profession. The name for RN in Sweden is "Sjuksköterska" which literally translates to "caretaker of the sick". The "problem" is that words ending with "-erska" are feminine. The neutral version of the title would be "Sjukskötare". Unfortunately, many see "sjuksköterska" as an established title. I also suspect that they are proud of their heritage and it being a traditional female profession, and changing the title would be to "surrender" to the men or something. I would prefer the neutral version , and many male nurses in Sweden have "sjukskötare" on their nametag or just "sjuksköt." to avoid the (percieved) stigma of the feminine title "sjuksköterska", and also call themselves sjukskötare.
  10. by   GunslingerOy
    I let them talk all they want!! I came from 8 years of a$$ breaking construction and 1 year of 16 to 18 hour day 6 days a week oilfield work. Now I am a Nurse I know that most of the "boys" that I worked with in those times don't even have the balls to do what we do. Let me see them apply a peripad, wipe up some vomit, then turn around and wash their hands and finish their lunch! That takes talent my friend.
    Last edit by GunslingerOy on Mar 3, '07 : Reason: typo
  11. by   dani_girl
    I started crying I was laughing so hard!!! I know you men have to put up with alot and it made me think of my brother, who is in the Coast Guard.
    Now people not involved in the C.G think they really don't do much, which is untrue, and that they don't leave the US coast more than 1/2 mile (again untrue) My brother's ship is a cutter so they jump on drug runner boats.. boats that drug runners will blow the bottoms out of and sink so they don't get busted.
    Anyhoo.. I was with him when we went out for lunch and it was a mainly Navy town (visiting me) and the guys just started harassing him w/ being a coastie.. and asking what good a coastie was for.
    my brother looked at them and said "Giving you Navy pretty babies to come home to."
    Keep up the great work.. hopefully one day you will all be simply Nurse! Your care will speak for itself, instead of your sex.

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