Pigeon-holed

  1. 0
    It gets old at times. I'm sitting 1:1 with a psych patient. A nurse comes from the other side of the unit to get me to help another CNA change a soiled patient. That same nurse's patient. Now I have nothing against ALL nurses (no pun intended) but I can't help but lose a little respect for that one particular one.

    I'm 6'3" 295lb and get called for every transfer, pull, change and I get placed with the psych patients that are more prone to violence. I ask myself often what that nurse does when I'm not on shift.

    It happens most places I've worked. What I don't like the most is that I get the grunt work while the smaller CNA's get Unit Secretary assignments. I have not only training as a Unit Secretary but did double duty as such/CNA in a max security prison.

    So it's just that I feel there's no equal distribution of labor. If that's the case I'd like to transfer to the ED. At least there I would get a critical care dept pay increase. Med/Surg they can have.


    Sorry... had to rant & vent a bit.
  2. 10 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Not fair, but I can understand why they do it. I mean I am sure those patients are much more compliant with you than they would be with someone smaller and female. It does suck I agree.
  4. 0
    Have you said anything to your manager?
  5. 0
    I haven't. It seems that it would be an exercise in futility.
  6. 0
    I don't have any advice for your particular situation, but thought I'd share.

    If one of my male colleagues helps me with some heavy lifting/transferring/repositioning, I make sure to return the favor. I'll reconcile a MAR, hang a IVPB, or answer a light for him.

    We have awesome teamwork and don't take advantage of each other.

    Speak up and don't become bitter!
  7. 0
    If you have a pattern with this particular nurse you should have a "crucial conversation" with them to tell them how you feel. They may not realize that you feel that way and will look for other staff to help sometimes. It is hard as a guy because what you described has probably happened to all of us...understandably of course but it's still a little frustrating. I'm sure if you had a good relationship with this said nurse, this type of ask would not bother you at all and you would be happy to do it. If I was your manager and you came to me with this type of complaint the first thing I would say is, "Have you spoken to her?"...

    Good luck!
  8. 1
    I can't speak from experience but I hear your "vent". I bet the ones who you help really appreciate it, though. I would that them saying thanks would make a difference.

    I do have some pt moving experience, I used to work for KCI (the air bed company) and I'd always assist with bed-to-bed transfers. The staff were always very appreciative, but I was an "outsider", not staff (who are close like family) and you know how "you only hurt the ones you love", i.e., folks are toughest on the ones closest to them.

    If you were a great big FEMALE, when they come to you for help you could ask them "What're you going to do for me?" but if a man asks that, boom - sexual harassment suit!
    pacjeffery likes this.
  9. 0
    When I worked with adults I would always get asked to help with lifting and such things, because I 'm a guy. There were times when I've been busy charting while the female nurses around me were goofing around and visiting. Someone would come up that needed help with a lift or to clean up a heavy patient and I would always be the one who was asked to help. After years of similar situations, if I was busy and others weren't, I would say to ask someone else. I am the kind of person who likes to help out and will look for things to do when there is down time, but when I'm busy, I'm busy.

    Also, female nurses tend to talk about things around me that would be very inappropriate for me to talk about around them. For example talking about how attractive a certain guy is etc. If I were to sit around with another male nurse talking about how attractive a certain woman is, it would not go over so well.


    You run into a lot of double standards as a male nurse in a prodominately female environment.

    In highschool I was a nursing assistant, one of the charge nurses would say subtle sexually suggestive things to me, and occasionaly swat me on the butt with a chart or something. Of course I didn't mind, she was twice my age and very attractive, but think if the roles had been reversed. If something similar happened now I would put a stop to it, but at 16 I wasn't about to complain. Besides my mom was the director of nursing. Strange situation now that I think about it. Sorry for rambling.
  10. 0
    Quote from shermrn
    When I worked with adults I would always get asked to help with lifting and such things, because I 'm a guy. There were times when I've been busy charting while the female nurses around me were goofing around and visiting. Someone would come up that needed help with a lift or to clean up a heavy patient and I would always be the one who was asked to help. After years of similar situations, if I was busy and others weren't, I would say to ask someone else. I am the kind of person who likes to help out and will look for things to do when there is down time, but when I'm busy, I'm busy.

    Also, female nurses tend to talk about things around me that would be very inappropriate for me to talk about around them. For example talking about how attractive a certain guy is etc. If I were to sit around with another male nurse talking about how attractive a certain woman is, it would not go over so well.

    You run into a lot of double standards as a male nurse in a prodominately female environment.

    In highschool I was a nursing assistant, one of the charge nurses would say subtle sexually suggestive things to me, and occasionaly swat me on the butt with a chart or something. Of course I didn't mind, she was twice my age and very attractive, but think if the roles had been reversed. If something similar happened now I would put a stop to it, but at 16 I wasn't about to complain. Besides my mom was the director of nursing. Strange situation now that I think about it. Sorry for rambling.
    Don't apologize. I had to rant too. And I completely agree with you. Double standards abound. If I were to do 1/10th of what is done around me I wouldn't have a job!
  11. 0
    Quote from aTOMicTom
    I can't speak from experience but I hear your "vent". I bet the ones who you help really appreciate it, though. I would that them saying thanks would make a difference.

    I do have some pt moving experience, I used to work for KCI (the air bed company) and I'd always assist with bed-to-bed transfers. The staff were always very appreciative, but I was an "outsider", not staff (who are close like family) and you know how "you only hurt the ones you love", i.e., folks are toughest on the ones closest to them.

    If you were a great big FEMALE, when they come to you for help you could ask them "What're you going to do for me?" but if a man asks that, boom - sexual harassment suit!
    I am a great big female and I get to do all the grunt work too, without reciprocation.


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