OB Clinicals - page 4

I would like to know about your experience in OB/Maternal Nursing clinical rotations.... Read More

  1. by   malenurse1
    Well, here is my two cents ... I have mixed feelings about my OB rotation. Going into the rotation I had already had the priveledge of witnessing a couple of births as well as assisting with my youngest daughters birth, (a great story that I will save for another thread). I tried to keep an open mind goning into the rotation, hoping that something good might come from it. The first day we were teamed up with another student, we walked in the room of the first postpartum mom that we were assigned and I intoduced myself. The pt looked at me and then looked at my classmate, then she looked at me and asked if her RN was available. Mind you, each pt had been asked if they would mind haveing a student care for them and had agreed to the same. The RN went in and then she got our instructor who came out and informed us that the pt had decided that she didn't want any student caring for her. The next day was much of the same except that it was just me. I asked my instructor to let me go to Peds, the nursery, and the NICU (all part of this rotation). I stated that I felt that the "vibe" I got from the patients is that it was because of my gender. I alos told her of my past experiance with childbirth and that I felt that I not only wouldn't miss much on OB, but that I would gain more from going to the other areas as I am interested in Peds/NICU as a career. She said that it had nothing to do with my gender, cause so many women have male MD's. I said that the nurse-patient relationship in the OB setting is much more intimate than the doctor-patient relationship (this was confirmed by my wife and several female friends and coworkers). I also said that I didn't have a problem with this fact, and I even respect it, why did she. She just didn't want to accept that she might be a little wrong on this one. Eventually as the rotation progressed she found two women for me to take care of, one was a former classmate who had had academic problems. She knew and trusted me to be caring enough for her and her twins. The other was a postpartum woman who was G-5 P-5, all sons! When I thanked her for allowing me to care for her she said that when her first two sons were born it was at a teaching hospital and her doctor asked if he could bring in some med students to observe. She siad okay and they were all male. She said it was great that it turned out that it was like her own little cheering section. By the time I came along and her fifth son, a male nurse was really no big deal!
    All-in-all, the rotation turned out to be a good expiriance (that I wouldn't want to repeat, lol). I got to spend some time in the NICU and peds and I loved it! To those of you that can work in OB ... great we need people like you ... it just isn't my cup of tea.
  2. by   barefootlady
    I am not a man, was already a mother when I went into nursing, but that said I hated my OB clinicals. I had a broken leg in a walking cast, could not move fast enough for some of the regular staff and was run over by a stretcher. The docs were rude and very mean to everyone, even the patients, one doc told patient to "shut-up", he was tired of her hollering. Our instructor was going through a divorce and was never anywhere to be found on the unit, but always on the phone out on post delivery unit. Saw 3 births and 1 c-section. These were young women, the babies were healthy and strong, but the atmosphere was one of "what a bother". No husbands, mothers, or other family members were allowed into the delivery room. The docs controlled everything and when something went wrong it was blamed on the first nurse in sight. Like I said, I hated every minute of it, studied the book and made A's, but would never have chosen to work OB. I know some units are wonderful, but after that experience, I would not even chance it.
  3. by   JessicaInOr
    Quote from jwk
    AH, you mean most FEMALE nurses, right? Let's get the right sexist slant ot this.


    Males should automatically be excluded from L&D? Give me a break.


    Well gee, what if I'm not "comfortable" with a female nurse? By your criteria, I shouldn't even have to ask that I not be taken care of by a female nurse. It should just be assumed. I feel my "rights" being trampled on already!


    What a crock.


    Your sexist attitudes are truly appalling. I'm curious - what other "types" of people shouldn't take care of expectant mothers?

    FANTASTIC POST! (the comments you were replying to likely won't show up but that's okay, your words are the good ones!)
  4. by   pfitz1079
    My OB rotation was a generally unpleasant experience. The patient's all were comfortable with me. My instructor was one of the best I had in school. I was at ease with the skills involved. [I spent ten years as a paramedic before going to nursing school - I know how to catch a baby.] There were plenty of births during my days there.

    So what was the problem?

    The staff. They treated me like a I had the plague. They were rude to me. They often sent me out to fetch something. Upon my return told me that they'd done everything, and I could go. One went so far as to try and convince a patient to ask me to leave. The way I see it, most nurses in OB see it as the last bastion of all-female nursing, and see any nurse with a Y chromosome as an intruder.

    Today I work in transport. It always makes my day when I go into a community hospital L&D to take over a patient they can't handle. Being competent with OB has nothing to do with owning a vagina.

    MosCOW, when they come for my prostate, I'd let you be my nurse, so you can wipe my butt.

    Pete Fitzpatrick
    RN, CCRN, CFRN, EMT-P
  5. by   Calfax
    I think back to when I was in nursing school....and my OB rotation. They were really rude, ungrateful for help and couldn't start IV's worth a damn. They didn't seem to want any students there and definately not any male students. That's OK, because I didn't want to be there, either. But afterwards, my clinical rotation took the time to meet with the dept supervisor to inform her that none of us would be willing to come to work there after graduation because of their attitudes and we recommended that the university terminate that clinical site.

    However, I am a military nurse.......and there are simply more male nurses in the military and therefore more male nurses on the L&D and OB decks along with male corpmen. Most of the male nurses don't really want to be there.....although it's a toss-up whether the nurses or the military wives have the better tattoos.
  6. by   JMBM
    Quote from pfitz1079
    My OB rotation was a generally unpleasant experience. The patient's all were comfortable with me. My instructor was one of the best I had in school. I was at ease with the skills involved. [I spent ten years as a paramedic before going to nursing school - I know how to catch a baby.] There were plenty of births during my days there.

    So what was the problem?

    The staff. They treated me like a I had the plague. They were rude to me. They often sent me out to fetch something. Upon my return told me that they'd done everything, and I could go. One went so far as to try and convince a patient to ask me to leave. The way I see it, most nurses in OB see it as the last bastion of all-female nursing, and see any nurse with a Y chromosome as an intruder.

    Today I work in transport. It always makes my day when I go into a community hospital L&D to take over a patient they can't handle. Being competent with OB has nothing to do with owning a vagina.

    MosCOW, when they come for my prostate, I'd let you be my nurse, so you can wipe my butt.

    Pete Fitzpatrick
    RN, CCRN, CFRN, EMT-P

    Exactly my experience. The patients had no problem at all with a male nurse (I asked), but the staff were non-stop rude. It was the only unit I worked on where I experienced this. Now I'm in Emergency and loving it.
  7. by   gtrexler1
    I thought my OB experience was great. I didn't feel uncomfortable at all. At our awards banquet last year, I actually won the outstanding OB nursing award..haha
  8. by   ladydame
    Quote from carolynd
    I would like to know about your experience in OB/Maternal Nursing clinical rotations.

    Clinical in OB/Maternal Nursing was quite a rewarding experience. Sure you have those incidents in which a mother or baby aren't healthy, but overall it's a really happy time for everyone on the floor. It's always amazing to experience a birth and interact with the patient that has just given birth. I wasn't too sure about this clinical, but afterwards I looked back on it as one of my favorites and one of the most rewarding
  9. by   Medical Maria
    Quote from carolynd
    I would like to know about your experience in OB/Maternal Nursing clinical rotations.
    It was an eye-opener and a very pleasant experience. I did OB/Gyn at Kaiser Sunset in L.A. about fifteen years ago. It was a very good unit...I saw a half dozen births and one c-section. Expectant fathers were not always happy to see a male nursing student in the back of the room, otherwise things were cool. I got to see a circumcision procedure, performed by a female MD, ask questions and report back to the class on it. I remember the NICU was a trip (all those little ET's) and that I had to study really hard for the module, not knowing ANYTHING about pregnancy and birth beforehand. I believe they're a lot stricter now in California about who can be in the delivery room and especially about videotaping.
  10. by   Mandylpn
    Quote from carolynd
    I would like to know about your experience in OB/Maternal Nursing clinical rotations.

    Well lets see,,,,,,, no babies in the NICU to observe or care for. Moms reluctant to have a student do any of their assessments, do not really like you doing assessments on their baby, moms have baby in room all the time, so you have to disturb them to try to do your assessments. Hard to do teaching, always company or family members in the room. Not all of them really want a student doing their cares. did I miss anything?
  11. by   Dayray
    First off let me say that both of my clinical experiences were difficult. I went to a 1+1 program (LPN then RN).

    My LPN clinical was the worst I was repeatedly embarrassed, made to feel out of place and insulted, by nurses not by patients. However, this was the clinical that made me become an L&D nurse so I wouldn't trade all that frustration for anything. My OB clinical was 3 days long and by the third day I was happy to see it ending.

    On my third day I was hiding in a corner at the nurses station pretending to read while I tried to be invisible. A call light went off and to my great displeasure I was the only student or nurse at the station so I was sent by the secretary to see what the patent needed. I hadn't been allowed into room for anything other then vital sighs because it was assumed that I would make the patients uncomfortable. When I got to the room I ended up having an experience I hadn't expected. I ended up supporting a very scared patient threw her labor. Her nurse threw me out but the patient made her bring me back. I walked away from that experience very confused but very much in love with OB.

    On my second clinical I learned that a male nursing student is different from a male nurse. By the time I went back for my RN clinical I had been working as a postpartum nurse for 6 months and patients had more reservations toward me as a student then I was accustomed to as a postpartum nurse.

    As far as the debate about weather or not the patient should be asked about having MALE nursing student. I do think that all patients should be asked weather or not they want nursing students in general however I don't think that they should be asked specifically about MALE nursing students, to do so implies that there is something wrong with MALE nursing students (and male nurses for that matter). At the same time I believe that the patients feelings regarding male care providers should be taken into consideration. Consideration of the patient's feelings is easily addressed by assigning MALE nursing students to patients who have CHOSEN male doctors. Now as an L&D nurse I don't choose my pateint assighnments based on the gender of their doctor but there is a differance between nurse and student nurse.

    I am nearing the end of my third year as a labor and delivery nurse. I can tell you that most patients don't have the same reservations about men in nursing that many nurses do. Yes there have been a few patients that have asked for a female nurse and there have been a few times that I have traded patients because either I sensed they were uncomfortable or I was uncomfortable.

    For the most part my patients love me as much as I love them. I cant remember the last time I paid for Starbucks because patients send me thank you notes with Starbucks cards (I have 6 in my wallet at the moment). Sometimes I even forget that I am a MALE nurse and just think of myself as a nurse.

    As for the concerns that have been brought up about patients with a history of sexual abuse:

    This was a concern of mine when I entered this area. What I have found is that I often do better then my coworkers with patients who have been abused. Weather this is because of my gender or in spite of it I'm not sure but very often the patients I have taken care of with histories of abuse ask for me when they come back. Patients who have been abused by bad people were abused by a person and weather that person was male or female does not automatically make all men abusers in their mind.

    Most sexually abused women don't distrust all men. More commonly people who have had a string of bad relationships assume that attitude. It is a coping mechanism used by people (of either gender) to convince themselves that they were not at fault for relationship problems so they place all the blame on members of the opposite sex i.e.. They are all dogs or crazy. I have actually observed the inverse of this attitude in abused women. I have had many patients talk to me about their history of abuse and have had the privilege of finding them help.

    Every time men in OB (or men in nursing for that matter) is addressed on this board the subject of cultural and religious beliefs is brought up. Honestly this one tiers me because it should go without mention. Of course muslem women should not be made to accept a male care provider.

    I love responding to the subject of men in OB because I think that people's perception of it needs to change. I can tell you from experience that its not as complicated as we (nurses) often make it out to be.
  12. by   winslow
    Doing OB right now, and clinical has been wonderful so far. A couple guys at my clinical site have been told the patient didn't want a male nurse, and a couple patients have said no students at all in the room. It really bothers me when I hear about not wanting male nurses in the room considering most of the OB docs are male. I don't understand that one.

    However, I'm enjoying OB so much that I would consider working there if I could get past some stereotypes and actually get offered a job there when I graduate.
  13. by   top notch student
    I absolutely loved my first patient. she was a young mother of 19 like myself. she was eager for information and attention. I graciously met every whim with a smile because she made me feel as if I was my destiny to be a nurse. She was the mother of a pre term baby girl that was in nicu. I was able to give her depo shot, remove her c - section staples, and apply steri strips. Even though she was afraid she never made me feel unwanted.

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