nurse/security

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    On my unit a medical/behavioral unit, there have been a few instances where male nurses have stood up to patients for protecting fellow female nurses. one time the male nurse had to physically intervene in a serious situation where charges were pressed and that intervening nurse had to goto the ER to be assessed. during processing of the event, HR made a comment to the male nurse that there should be at least one male nurse assigned to the unit per shift for situations such as these. If this were to go though, how it this fair to the male nurses who now have to spend extra time and effort in worrying about the security of other female nurses and other staff.
    -Is this sexist
    -is this a fair proposal without additional payment
    -should male nurses formally play a part of a security team on certain units
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  3. 6 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    I like to think that we each play to our strengths. Is it sexist for men (usually larger and stronger) to step into a physical situation? Sure, but it is part of life on Earth. With all of our efforts on equality some things are just pretty ingrained. HR should not have made that comment though. If the unit isn't safe for a bunch of female nurses, it must be made safe. And not by using male nurses for security, that should come from security. Male nurses should not be in a security role. It is not fair to create security by scheduling male nurses. What happens when the male nurse calls out sick or wants to switch a shift? I would call this an unacceptable solution.
    zieglarf likes this.
  5. 1
    As a long-time psychiatric nurse of the female persuasion, I have always been offended by the suggestion that I need males around to "protect" me (or anyone else) on a psych unit. Unfortunately, that kind of thinking is common. On psychiatric units, we all work together to keep everyone safe. Yes, it is a sexist idea. No, there should not be "additional payment" for you doing what is your job. Everyone on a psychiatric unit is part of a "security team." It is dangerous for female staff in these kinds of settings to start thinking that there are individuals around whose job it is to protect them.
    zieglarf likes this.
  6. 0
    I meant additional payment as in nurses being trained and holding a security role. I was just throwing around an idea. but thank you for the input from you both.
  7. 0
    No, I don't think men should get paid more to act as security. We're all (men and women) doing the same job and should be paid at the same rate. With that said, let's not be naive and say women are just as capable in physical altercations as men. Of course we take the lead in these situations. With very few exceptions we are much stronger and much more intimidating. It's a biologically natural reaction. But that doesn't mean men should receive an additional pay or anything.
  8. 0
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    With that said, let's not be naive and say women are just as capable in physical altercations as men. Of course we take the lead in these situations. With very few exceptions we are much stronger and much more intimidating. It's a biologically natural reaction. But that doesn't mean men should receive an additional pay or anything.
    Over the years, I've known plenty of female colleagues in psychiatric settings who were much more "capable in physical altercations" than some of the male staff with whom I've worked -- esp. since we are talking about implementing facility-approved non-violent restraint techniques, not a bar fight. And male staff have never "taken the lead" in restraining clients in any situation in which I was the RN in charge -- that is the role and responsibility of the RN in charge. These situations are not about being physically strong and intimidating -- they are about clinical and therapeutic skills and expertise. Appearing "intimidating" can often make a situation worse than it would otherwise be.

    And, of course, the best option is always to avoid things getting to the point of a physical intervention in the first place.
  9. 0
    in this particular situation a 120lbs female nurse was being choked by a 230lbs man who had just been transferred from the ED who had taken pcp in the past 24h. another nurse, a male nurse physically wrestled his grip free and was able to defend himself in a small room long enough until security arrived.


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