Man with Law Degree Considering Nursing - page 4

by JSBes 7,453 Views | 40 Comments

So, you wanna be a nurse? Yes. But, I have a few concerns. Here is a quick synopsis of my background: Union Ironworker, got injured on the job, started college while recovering from a couple knee surgeries Recovered... Read More


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    Dear Prospective Nurse: I agree with most of the comments already written. I wonder, however, if you have thought about how you will approach real life nursing with your background in law. That is because the law is bent every day in hospitals and other health care settings. If you take to heart your legal and professional obligations as a nurse, you will likely find that there is not the time, opportunity, or facility support for truly doing your job properly. It is, like law, "swimming with sharks" - just food for thought.
    wooh and Susie2310 like this.
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    Hey Jim. You wanna laugh? I am a RN with a BSN & MSN. Later became an attorney, practiced as a litigator for 17 years-- which I hated. Got laid off 4 years ago and have been trying to get back into nursing ever since. Took a 6 month RN refresher course and got an A+, no job. Even offered to work for FREE-- still no dice. Put together a curriculum on nursing and the law and pitched it to schools--even community colleges-- no job still. Not saying that will happen with you. What I am saying is that you should only become a nurse if that is what you really want to do as there is no job guarantee. Size and gender will not be an issue. Good luck and send a message if you want to discuss further.
    hoplite07 and LuLu2008 like this.
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    Quote from JulietteP
    Hey Jim. You wanna laugh? I am a RN with a BSN & MSN. Later became an attorney, practiced as a litigator for 17 years-- which I hated. Got laid off 4 years ago and have been trying to get back into nursing ever since. Took a 6 month RN refresher course and got an A+, no job. Even offered to work for FREE-- still no dice. Put together a curriculum on nursing and the law and pitched it to schools--even community colleges-- no job still. Not saying that will happen with you. What I am saying is that you should only become a nurse if that is what you really want to do as there is no job guarantee. Size and gender will not be an issue. Good luck and send a message if you want to discuss further.
    Agreed, hardest part bar none between prereqs, acceptance (close second), academics, state boards, financing education, and landing first acute care job is that last one. Hospitals burn 22K per new grad, and will avoid hiring you as a new grad at all costs.
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    One option you may want to consider - legal nurse consultant.
    I read about this specialty in nursing magazines.
    From what I've learned, there is a demand for this type of nurse
    HonestRN likes this.
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    Jim,

    If you haven't already done so, I recommend reading the thread "Think twice before becoming a nurse", under Nursing Activism/Healthcare Politics. Training as an RN is a huge investment in time and money and there are no guarantees you will like the nursing workplace any more than you do law, even if you are successful in finding employment. Nursing practice is regulated by laws. You will find yourself grappling with legalities in nursing constantly. Check out the Board of Registered Nursing for your state.
    LuLu2008 likes this.
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    To Lulu2008,

    Very well put. My observations/experience exactly, I'm sorry to say. One of the saddest truths about nursing.
    Last edit by Susie2310 on May 4, '12 : Reason: Hit wrong button by mistake - this was a reply to Lulu2008
    LuLu2008 likes this.
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    Quote from stargazer88
    One option you may want to consider - legal nurse consultant.
    I read about this specialty in nursing magazines.
    From what I've learned, there is a demand for this type of nurse
    I'm glad you mentioned this option stargazer88 because I was just going to mention it myself. I have a friend who is an attorney and suggested I go to law school because having a background in nursing and having a law degree would lead to some lucrative job opportunities.
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    Quote from MN-Nurse
    For men with professional degrees other than nursing who have entered the nursing field, are/were you questioned about why you did not pursue/continue your other career path?

    All the time; I was an engineer.

    If so, how did you deal with those questions, and what was the general response?

    It actually makes for very good conversation and interview banter. People are intensely interested. You get asked a lot, so I have a few canned responses I pull out for different situations. The general response is overwhelmingly positive, especially within healthcare. There are a few people in my family who still don't understand why I left engineering, but they still think I was Tony Stark. Seriously.

    And, have you been able to incorporate your previous education into your new professional life?

    All the time. I was a Project Manager so juggling/prioritizing multiple tasks at once while dealing with people from varying backgrounds across a spectrum of personalities was indeed very helpful experience. Not to mention regularly running into situations that I had to learn quickly on the job.

    For family men, how did you handle going to nursing school, being a father and a husband, and coordinating all of your various responsibilities?

    Got nothing for you here. I just got two cats and we are not on all that good of terms.

    For other "big guys" out there (I'm 6'11" and 320 lbs), have you ever encountered patients or fellow medical professionals who have been intimidated by you and have treated you differently because of your size? And is your size generally a boon or detriment to you professionally?

    I know some other male nurses who are large individuals. If they are treated differently due to their size, this first impression quickly fades away after you get to know them. Your coworkers will react to how you behave.

    And, finally, probably the most practical question here, do they make really big scrubs???

    They sure do.

    why in blazes did you give up engineering for nursing???
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    I agree with "Chicago 898". His message is very important and on point. If I were you since you have a 7 month old baby at home I will at least wait until that baby is school age before attempting to go to nursing school. If you return now you will have to borrow more money, pay babysitters and the stress will cause you more weight gain(trust me). Like some of the posts said an ADN degree is just not "cutting it" now because the market is saturated with those degrees so now the recruiters are taking the BSN's or MSN's degrees.
    It seems at one point that everyone you talk to was going into nursing and now look what we have on our hands. Many were going into nursing because they thought it was a "guranteed job" with excellent pay. Nothing in this life is, except death and taxes.
    Most of the hospitals here in CA still hire travel nurses because they do not have to train them, no benefits, no sick time, no vacation, the agency will provide those benefits to the nurse sometimes. Certain hospitals still have strikes and nurses from all over come to work those strikes because the pay is excellent. But you have to have experience to be a travel nurse. I think as someone suggested maybe a Physician Assistant will be a good opportunity, but I don't know if all colleges offer this course and you may have to move if your hometown college does not offer this course. It is unfortunate that nursing is not what it use to be and I don't see it improving in the future. Best wishes to you.
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    I wouldn't wait until the 7month old is in school at all. Many of us went to school while raising a family and you have your wife to help out! Time marches on no matter what so why wait? 3-4 yrs is going to go by quickly. At the very least go part time and pluck away. I'm telling you that if I can do it, most people out there can. Jobs are scarce so selling yourself is important.

    Many colleges insist of you being cna certified before being allowed into the nursing program so maybe check it out and see how the shoe seems to fit. Please keep us posted and I wish you the best!
    hoplite07 likes this.


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