Male nurses who cook - page 3

I suppose you're wondering why I've asked you all here. Table saws, scratching, sports all aside, I am wondering if there is any interest in the fine culinary arts. Particularly those peculiar to the... Read More

  1. by   Crumbwannabe
    Hello

    I have a passion for real Chai, not that impersonator from the bookstores. Lemme post it. First remember everything must be of the highest quality I recommend a good health food/organic store. Believe it or not, the spices are fresher and cheaper, usually sold in bulk. And the sugar,if you want it, get unprocessed, brown or turbinado. Tea should be black, Darjelling, English or Irish Breakfast works real well.

    OK:
    1.Real vanilla extract, organic, preferably with a vanilla bean cut into lengths and soaking in the bottle for a day or more.

    6-8 dried allspice berries
    6-8 black peppercorns
    1/4 tsp whole cloves
    1/8 tsp cardamom seed
    stick cinnamon 1.5 sticks about 3 inches worth

    Crush the spices in a mortar, add 4-5 1/8" pieces fresh ginger root, peeled, and add to 1 cup boiling water on the stove. May add a 1.5 inch piece vanilla bean. Simmer (don't boil) for 1/2 hour uncovered. [You will want to put on Christmas music when you smell the house]. Then add 1.5 cups milk, return to simmer, leaving uncovered for 15 more minutes, then add loose tea 1-2 tablespoons and simmer 15 more minutes. You have to watch this stuff that you don't burn milk or anything, and stir fairly often. You may find a skin on the top but it will come out in strainer.

    Strain this ambrosia into a vessel, add sugar to taste and a bit of vanilla extract if desired. If spices are too strong for your palate, add a little water or milk and reheat briefly. This is the classic way.

    You may omit the milk altogether, simply substituting water after the initial infusion. Also some like to add a touch of anise or fennel or both to the spice melange. It imparts a licorice flavor.

    If God made anything better, he kept it himself.....
  2. by   MaleRN2B
    I drank a lot of chai with chapati (a fried bread very similar to a tortilla), a queen cake (scones?) or "biscuits" (shortbread or sugar cookies) while living in Kenya. Tea is one of Kenya's major exports along with coffee and cut flowers. Milk is always included and it is very fatty, usually coming from the cow that same morning. The tea is a very strong black tea. The island of Zanzibar off the coast of Tanzania is a major producer of cloves and both countries produce sugarcane and process it into raw sugar. Nothing more was added there but nothing more was needed! Add to that the British colonial influence of tea at 10 and 2 and you had an interesting and tasty blend of many cultures and enough calories to carry you to your next meal. Yum!

    Marc
  3. by   Crumbwannabe
    Quote from malern2b
    tea is one of kenya's major exports along with coffee and cut flowers. milk is always included and it is very fatty, usually coming from the cow that same morning. the tea is a very strong black tea...edit
    marc
    thanks for the input

    i thought milk was the most traditional, but not absolutely essential. i must have had "americanized" chai. next, i'll be seeing mcchai.

    i much prefer it with the milk and no anise. i see why some people say to use half & half if the milk you use is fresh out of the cow. it's worth the time it takes to do it right, though. did i get the tea varieties right?
  4. by   Crumbwannabe
    Reproduced by permission of Karl Childers 1996

    ..."got any buiskits in there?" Biscuits

    4 biscuits Hot or cold, mmm, I reckon it don't matter none
    Mustard

    Spread mustard on them biskits much as you want. Ummm hummm. Good to eat while you're a-waitin' for the po-lice to pick you up after you kill Doyle.


    French Fried Pataters
    I like them French fried pataters down at the Frosty Freeze.

    A big order of them French fried pataters at the Frosty Freeze
    Mustard

    Cover 'em with mustard.


    Potted meat and sody crackers

    Potted meat from the Dollar store
    Sody crackers

    Spread the potted meat on the sody crackers.
    Make sure there ain't no lips or p*ckers in there...mmmm hmmmm


    "Some folks call it a sling blade, I call it a Kaiser blade, mmmm.
    CENTER]
    Last edit by Crumbwannabe on Mar 27, '05
  5. by   MaleRN2B
    Quote from crumbwannabe

    thanks for the input

    i thought milk was the most traditional, but not absolutely essential. i must have had "americanized" chai. next, i'll be seeing mcchai.

    i much prefer it with the milk and no anise. i see why some people say to use half & half if the milk you use is fresh out of the cow. it's worth the time it takes to do it right, though. did i get the tea varieties right?
    absolutely you want to use black tea. i'm sure chai was introduced into kenya when the indians came to build the railroads inland from the coast and it probably has local variations around the world depending on what spices are available.
  6. by   Crumbwannabe
    Quote from MaleRN2B
    Absolutely you want to use black tea. I'm sure chai was introduced into Kenya when the Indians came to build the railroads inland from the coast and it probably has local variations around the world depending on what spices are available.

    So what were you doing in Kenya? Missionary work? Not to get off the subject, but I had wanted to do some work with Mercy Ships, only to find out that I would have to pay passage and support myself on no salary. That kind of knocked me out of the running after getting skinned by previous wife in the past. So, I do some work at a free clinic to make up for it.

    It must be wonderful to experience different cultures.
  7. by   MaleRN2B
    I was a Peace Corps Volunteer from '95 - '97. It is a wonderful experience. I really miss it but was also glad to come home when I was done. I hadn't seen my family for over 2 years. Most "real" jobs overseas either pay you enough to come home every 6 months or provide that as part of the job. I would love to be a Peace Corps nurse and have the volunteers and staff as my patients but they only hire nurse practitioners, PAs and MDs.

    Sorry you got skinned by your former wife. Sounds painful!
  8. by   Crumbwannabe
    Quote from MaleRN2B
    ... edit...
    Sorry you got skinned by your former wife. Sounds painful!
    Actually, glad to be shut of her. Noncompliant bipolar, then I find out she started the bisexual thing. Then I felt guilty about it. Compound that with a firestarting, bedwetting,animal abusing brat (classic triad, they'll start finding bodies one of these days) that she wouldn't do anything about, I found myself either working as much as possible, sometimes 45+ days in a row, or insidiously but steadily starting to have a few too many to face (or not face it) it all at home. And one's as bad as the other. Then she shows up at the hearing all decked out fancying herself (honest to God) to be the woman in "Fatal Attraction". Even changes her E-mail to whatever the character's name was. Scary...

    That was my big lesson in trying to change/help someone. The "Dear wife" I have now Is God's gift, saw me at my lowest, gave me back my self esteem, and is one of the finest human beings on the face of the earth. A 5 foot dynamo with a Christian attitude, and a great fidelity. Everything Proverbs says a good wife is. Somehow I managed to spit in a mule's eye and came up with a mint julep. Life's funny that way....


    "The secret of life is honesty and fair-dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made"....Groucho Marx
  9. by   ryaninmtv
    I'm a guy nurse (or a nurse who's a guy) and I love to cook. More main course kind of things as I'm not too hot with pastries or desserts. I work as a case manager and wind up talking about food with a number of the clients I work with.

    Anybody have a good recipe for pad thai. I love thai food (when it's not flaming hot) and pad thai is one of my favorites but I haven't found a really good recipe for it. If you've got one, share it.

    Great thread guys!
  10. by   Crumbwannabe
    Wednesday Thai Chicken

    Makes 3-4 servings

    2 lb skinless boneless thick, whole chicken breasts washed and patted.

    Hot Thai Or-gin-nut Sauce: All fresh ingredients!!!! Combine:

    1/4 cup orange juice
    1/4 cup cocoanut milk fresh from the cocoanut (optional)
    1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
    Several pieces bruised lemon zest, and a bit of juice
    1 tbsp vegetable oil
    1/4 tsp. sesame oil (optional)
    1 cup beer or chicken stock
    1 tbsp. peanut butter thinned out with the soy and vinegar
    4-5 good grinds fresh course black pepper
    1/4 tsp. basil
    1 tsp. soy sauce
    1 teaspoon basalmic vinegar
    1/2 tablespoon sugar
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1 Tbsp. (to start) hot sauce, Tuong Ot Sriracha brand is best.
    ( If desired, may add 1/2 tsp fish sauce or scant 1/8" anchovy paste instead of fish sauce)

    Garnish:

    Fresh bean sprouts washed
    3-4 tablespoon crushed peanuts
    Liberal coarse torn fresh spinach leaves
    Julienne 1 cucumber, 3 carrots, 4 scallions
    Lemon rind twists.
    (Make plenty, it offsets the hot flavor, keep in cold water & hint of lemon juice until serving)

    Cooking:

    Marinade in sauce an hour to overnight hour in fridge, it just gets better. Grill chicken low to med. heat, 2-3 breasts each on 2 metal skewers for ease of turning, suspended across 2 bricks. Cook over orange pekoe tea and hickory or pecan wood chips well soaked Baste with marinade occasionally. Boil Thai noodles or rice stick as directed near end of grilling. Grill to golden color, moist, but done. Cut chicken into " slices against the grain, serve atop noodles sprinkle all with peanuts. Presentation is with veggies & lemon twists decoratively around the plate. Alternate bites of hot food with cool veggies and lemon twists to clear the palate. Keep the hot sauce handy, and it may need salt. Eat with white Reisling or Piniot Nior wine.
    Or Thunderbird if you can find a good vintage week.


    Give her some wine and red roses before, and a foot massage later.
    Last edit by Crumbwannabe on Mar 31, '05 : Reason: Typo
  11. by   ryaninmtv
    That looks awesome. Mix with a nice Chardonnay and I think the evening may be well in hand. Thanks.
  12. by   Crumbwannabe
    Quote from ryaninmtv
    That looks awesome. Mix with a nice Chardonnay and I think the evening may be well in hand. Thanks.

    The "Tuong Ot Sriracha" may be hard to find, but I'm sure it can be found on the web. It is a thick red sauce hot enough to take skin off the inside of your mouth. Penzeys is the place to go for highest quality spices. They are on the web. You usually get a little gift of something thrown in an order. Fairly easy on the pocketbook.

    A doc once told me that I wouldn't like really expensive wine if I tried it, and he's right, you have to work at it. So I didn't. Something mid price that tastes good is fine with me.

    Joking about the Thunderbird. That stuff is a one time only teenage memory that still turns my stomach to think about. Especially because I did some Malt Liquor that night too. Youth is wasted on the young.
  13. by   Crumbwannabe
    This may start some activity....Any good Spam recipies? The proud White Trash blood that flows through my veins, I was born with a can in my hand, and how it got there, don't ask me.

    I remember slices of Spam pan fried until slightly burned on the edges, served on soft doughy white bread pressed down with mother's hand. Sometimes accompanied by fried yesterday's Cream of Wheat strips (after sitting in the fridge all night to set) with salt and pepper. There is something to be said for having a mother who was raised during the Great Depression. It makes for creative use of leftovers. I still have a tendency to keep things in the fridge that were best discarded the night they were originally cooked. Therapy has helped, though.

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