Looking into nursing

  1. Hey everybody,

    I am married and have 3 kids and 1 on the way. I am 27 years old and don't really have a career going. The only schooling I have is a high school diploma. I have been looking into nursing as a career for the past 4-6 months and really am interested in going into this field. But I have a few concerns that i was hoping you guys can help me out.

    As I stated above I have a family and currently I am the only on providing the income in our home.

    As a sole provider would nursing be able to sustain a family of 6?

    Also if I was to choose nursing there are different school options. As stated above I am 27 and soon to be a father of 4 so time isn't necessarily on my side. There is a privately owned school that gets you a asn in 18 months but is really expensive and full time meaning I would have to quit my day job and go there full time and try and work something out part time at nights. The other option is community college which is cheaper but is longer and will take about 3 years to complete for an asn.

    What would you suggest would be the best route?

    Lastly....

    If I do choose the privately owned school and wanted to continue my education and possibly get my msn or crna are there other privately owned schools that offer those kind of programs? (I hope this makes sense)

    Anyways I hope I am not troubling anyone and certainly hope I did t bore anyone with this but am anxious at tbe same time. Any feedback would be appreciated.

    Thanks!
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  2. Visit Bholmes profile page

    About Bholmes

    Joined: Aug '17; Posts: 8; Likes: 1
    from UT , US

    15 Comments

  3. by   Stepper
    I taught at a community college and non-traditional students, like yourself, were common. One consideration is if the private school is eligible for financial aid. I know you would most likely qualify in accredited community college.
  4. by   OldDude
    Without knowing your financial obligations I can't have an opinion about that. My gut feeling here is to take the longer/slower/cheaper route and keep your current job as long as you can.
  5. by   Guy in Babyland
    I would suggest you go to your state's BON website and examine the NCLEX pass rates for the schools you are considering. The time it takes you to complete your degree is irrelevant if the school does a poor job preparing you to pass NCLEX and you spend a year trying to pass NCLEX.
  6. by   Bholmes
    Thank you for the response. That does make sense. I have researched the accelerated school that I am deciding to go to and they have high pass rates. My concern is the highest program they have to offer is an rn-bsn. I would like to further my edu higher and possibly apply for a CRNA program or get an MSN. But my question is are there schools out there that have CRNA/MSN programs that would accept credits from an accelerated privately owned school?
  7. by   OldDude
    Just make sure you can pay the bills
  8. by   Bholmes
    That is the challenege.... if it was just my wife and I it would be a no brainer. Add 3 kids in the mix with one in the way it gets complicated :/
  9. by   OldDude
    Quote from Bholmes
    That is the challenege.... if it was just my wife and I it would be a no brainer. Add 3 kids in the mix with one in the way it gets complicated :/
    Exactly, take it slow and easy. Kids are top priority.
  10. by   Mavrick
    Your post should be in the General Nursing section. These issues are relevant to ANYONE going into nursing.

    I'm would advocate the slower/cheaper course of action. There does not seem to be an option really if you are the only one providing income. You will have to go to school, work part time and probably take out some loans.

    You can do quite well on a nurse's income. Depending on your lifestyle, some overtime or a PRN second job can work until the kids are older or your wife can help (her contribution to the family should not be taken for granted as child care is expensive).
  11. by   barcode120x
    Edit: wrong thread.
  12. by   nurse2033
    Make sure the school is accredited. Get your ASN so you can start to work in the field. You can then pursue further degrees at your leisure. Good luck.
  13. by   Bholmes
    My apologies, I figured since I was a guy looking into nursing it should be in the "men in nursing" thread. Your post makes sense...
  14. by   Mavrick
    Quote from Bholmes
    My apologies, I figured since I was a guy looking into nursing it should be in the "men in nursing" thread. Your post makes sense...
    Just thinking you might get more responses. Women nurses have some pretty good ideas too.

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