Husband wants to try nursing at 44 - page 2

I am his second wife and ever since he's known me I've been doing prereqs, on the waiting list, in nursing school and now, finally - an RN! So here I am a new grad RN and he has decided belatedly... Read More

  1. by   FNimuaeMae
    Hey-

    I graduated in 1999, and one of the guys in my class was 54. I say go for it!

    Missy
  2. by   BamaBound2bRN
    I think it is an excellent choice. I am 39 and just left Wally(Mart)World where I worked 80 weeks generating 400 Million in sales for the largest retailer. I look forward to a career helping others who want and need my help.
    Quote from mstigerlily
    I am his second wife and ever since he's known me I've been doing prereqs, on the waiting list, in nursing school and now, finally - an RN! So here I am a new grad RN and he has decided belatedly that he would like to try nursing.

    His background is this: BS in Computer Science, many desk jobs in programming and teaching programming, some experience working in retail management. He is a GREAT teacher, and a GREAT salesman. He also is a dive instructor so has some experience with search and rescue and helping drowning people, etc. He is also fantastic with kids (has five of his own), the kind of big teddy bear type of guy that kids and dogs just love. He has been burned out on programming/retail for awhile now and hates the 9-5 desk thing. He has been staying home the last year to raise our 1 yr old while I finished school.

    I think that actually he would make a fantastic nurse but we are both sort of daunted by the idea of starting all over again - with the prereqs, the classes, the studying, the NCLEX, etc. Is it worth it for him to try? Is it too late? Anyone other males out there who decided to recareer as a nurse at this age?

    Melissa
  3. by   gwt
    HI,
    I'm 46, just finished 5 semesters of pre-reqs and begin 5 semesters of nursing classes for my BSN this fall. I just love it. He will know after a good semester or two of the requisites if it's for him. I never went to college a day in my life before this and dropped out of hight school to work for a living. I've aced all but 4 classes out of 68 cedit hours and settled in at a university level school just nicely last year. My experience is that it is 99% personal responsibility, but I have found everyone from students to professors to be extremely helpful. They want you to succeed!
  4. by   Ex130Load
    Am ex-military too. Completed my last final a week ago for BSN and am staring at a quickly approaching 50. The earlier comments about forcing an older body and brain to go through the rigors of nursing and the benefit of "being in shape" are so true. I like my sleep and wish I could get back what I lost. LOL Old brains work less efficiently... meaning papers can take longer to write... meaning I lost more sleep than the younger ones. I and another older student often joked, griped, and *****ed (while drinking coffee and diet Cokes) about how many near sleepless nights were enduring. Alas, water under the bridge now.

    It may not be pretty or easy, but it can be done at an older age. That shouldn't be the preclusionary factor.
  5. by   Tweety
    Please encourage him and support him the way he did you. Age doesn't matter! We need the nurses!

    I'm currently precepting a 2nd Career new grad RN that's male and in his 40s. He's a great nurse and has many years left to practice.

    Congrats on finishing the long journey yourself.
    Last edit by Tweety on May 16, '05
  6. by   CIORN
    Tell your husband to go for it! The combination of IT skills with a clinical/nursing background is a combination that is hard to find and much sought after. I was in IT in my 20's and went back to nursing school and worked in the icu for 2 years before moving on to a software vendor. I eventually became a CIO in a 200 bed hospital and have since moved on to be a IT director in a large IHN (7 hospitals).

    You husband can write his own ticket and earn a nice income if he chooses to pursue nursing in combination wth his IT skills. I would suggest that he work on the floor for a year or two before he makes the leap into the healthcare IT arena - it adds credibility. Please feel free to email if you like:

    icumonkey1@yahoo.com


    Quote from mstigerlily
    I am his second wife and ever since he's known me I've been doing prereqs, on the waiting list, in nursing school and now, finally - an RN! So here I am a new grad RN and he has decided belatedly that he would like to try nursing.

    His background is this: BS in Computer Science, many desk jobs in programming and teaching programming, some experience working in retail management. He is a GREAT teacher, and a GREAT salesman. He also is a dive instructor so has some experience with search and rescue and helping drowning people, etc. He is also fantastic with kids (has five of his own), the kind of big teddy bear type of guy that kids and dogs just love. He has been burned out on programming/retail for awhile now and hates the 9-5 desk thing. He has been staying home the last year to raise our 1 yr old while I finished school.

    I think that actually he would make a fantastic nurse but we are both sort of daunted by the idea of starting all over again - with the prereqs, the classes, the studying, the NCLEX, etc. Is it worth it for him to try? Is it too late? Anyone other males out there who decided to recareer as a nurse at this age?

    Melissa
  7. by   Diahni
    I think that actually he would make a fantastic nurse but we are both sort of daunted by the idea of starting all over again - with the prereqs, the classes, the studying, the NCLEX, etc. Is it worth it for him to try? Is it too late? Anyone other males out there who decided to recareer as a nurse at this age?

    Melissa[/QUOTE]

    HI Melissa - I just finished my first year of an ADN program. Since I already have a BA in Biology, I'll be able to continue for my nursing master's degree - I'm not sure which yet. I am 52. You are NEVER too old to do anything except maybe be a gymnast. Tell your husband to go for it. We need some male nurses. Don't forget we're all living longer, too. One of the good things about being a baby boomer is we can't quite get it through our heads we are "old." Another good thing about starting something new later in life is experiences and and relationships that make your life more interesting. Also, just think about how much more you'll have to talk about.
    And if you ever "retire," and travel around, you can both do travel nursing.
    Not only is it a great idea, he'll probably inspire others to do the same.
    Diahni
  8. by   flibble
    Tell your husband to go for it! My husband was 38 and a 15 year police veteran. He wanted some job less political. I encouraged him to try nursing. He didn't think he could compete with the younger kids and work to support his family. I knew he could! He went back to school and blew the youngsters away. He won every academic award possible and was Student Nurse Assoc. President and had a 4.0 and worked full time and took care of a disabled wife.They still have his picture on the school's web site . He was wooed by every hospital around. Good Luck! Flibble
  9. by   alintanurse
    In my graduating class were 2 women who were both 55 years old. They were both able to find jobs right out of nursing school. So I know it can be done!
  10. by   mstigerlily
    Wow, thanks to everyone for your assistance and encouragement. We are excited about the prospect of him going to nursing school now!

    And icumonkey (sorry you didn't sign your name) I will be sure to pass on your e-mail to my husband, I'm sure he would be interested in talking with you. Thanks so much!

    Melissa

    Quote from CIORN
    Tell your husband to go for it! The combination of IT skills with a clinical/nursing background is a combination that is hard to find and much sought after. I was in IT in my 20's and went back to nursing school and worked in the icu for 2 years before moving on to a software vendor. I eventually became a CIO in a 200 bed hospital and have since moved on to be a IT director in a large IHN (7 hospitals).

    You husband can write his own ticket and earn a nice income if he chooses to pursue nursing in combination wth his IT skills. I would suggest that he work on the floor for a year or two before he makes the leap into the healthcare IT arena - it adds credibility. Please feel free to email if you like:

    icumonkey1@yahoo.com
  11. by   mgladius
    Hello, I am one of those males that started as an RN as a second career. Cut to the chase, yes he can do it. The problem in life is regrets. If he never ventures forward, he may have many regrets in later years. I was a detective before and army reserve officer before being activate with Desert Storm and getting a first hand tour of Kuwait. I did a lot of reflecting during my activation and came home, resigned form my detective's job and went to nursing and have not looked back. I am on active duty as a Nurse Corps Officer with the US Air Force and have been back to Kuwait again and all over the world. I find that I use many of my old skills daily in addition to my emergency room skills. Yes he can do it.

    Quote from mstigerlily
    I am his second wife and ever since he's known me I've been doing prereqs, on the waiting list, in nursing school and now, finally - an RN! So here I am a new grad RN and he has decided belatedly that he would like to try nursing.

    His background is this: BS in Computer Science, many desk jobs in programming and teaching programming, some experience working in retail management. He is a GREAT teacher, and a GREAT salesman. He also is a dive instructor so has some experience with search and rescue and helping drowning people, etc. He is also fantastic with kids (has five of his own), the kind of big teddy bear type of guy that kids and dogs just love. He has been burned out on programming/retail for awhile now and hates the 9-5 desk thing. He has been staying home the last year to raise our 1 yr old while I finished school.

    I think that actually he would make a fantastic nurse but we are both sort of daunted by the idea of starting all over again - with the prereqs, the classes, the studying, the NCLEX, etc. Is it worth it for him to try? Is it too late? Anyone other males out there who decided to recareer as a nurse at this age?

    Melissa
  12. by   pmw
    How old are his 5 kids? Does he pay child support? I think that if his kids are minors, he should work at this time and concentrate on supporting his kids. If he is going to school for AT LEAST 2 years (and NOT working), how would he support them?
    His kids should be his priority at this time.

    Now of course, if they are NOT minors, then he should go for it.
  13. by   nursemike
    Quote from pmw
    How old are his 5 kids? Does he pay child support? I think that if his kids are minors, he should work at this time and concentrate on supporting his kids. If he is going to school for AT LEAST 2 years (and NOT working), how would he support them?
    His kids should be his priority at this time.

    Now of course, if they are NOT minors, then he should go for it.
    Uh, well, I was going to make a sarcastic reply, but I just remembered I'm trying to be nicer, so I'll try to give a thoughtful answer.

    Certainly, parents have a duty to their children, but a father is more than a breadwinner. Actually, a friend of mine who is a single mom faces a similar problem, balancing her needs and those of her child. Fortunately, her parents are willing to help, and of course it's easy to see that my friend's education is an investment in her child's future. As a nurse, she can get a decent job with flexible hours, and present sacrifices will pay off with more time and money with which to--among other things--raise her child.
    More relevent, possibly, to a father with a decent job, being more fulfilled in one's career make's one a more well-rounded person, and that seems bound to benefit one's children. I would also argue that responsibility to one's children doen't mean matyrdom to them. Parenting is not a sentence to 18 years of foregoing one's own happiness.
    Finally, and especially in this forum, I find it hard to let go unchallenged the apparent assumption that financial support is solely, or even primarily, the responsibility of the father.

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