The growth of male nurses

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    Men have been involved in the nursing world long before it was even considered a profession. There are many men that have dedicated their life’s work to making the nursing profession a better environment for other men to come. These men, like Friar Juan de Mena and Jean Henry Dunant to name a few, have played important roles for nurses as a whole. Male nurses have many obstacles and stereotypes to overcome in order to succeed as a nurse. The continued progression of men entering the nursing field, coupled with acceptance from society, makes the choice for men to enter nursing easier. Nursing is a profession that values the care and competence of the individual, not the biological sex of the person providing the care.
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  3. 4 Comments so far...

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    Quote from ProudPapaRN
    Men have been involved in the nursing world long before it was even considered a profession. There are many men that have dedicated their life’s work to making the nursing profession a better environment for other men to come. These men, like Friar Juan de Mena and Jean Henry Dunant to name a few, have played important roles for nurses as a whole. Male nurses have many obstacles and stereotypes to overcome in order to succeed as a nurse. The continued progression of men entering the nursing field, coupled with acceptance from society, makes the choice for men to enter nursing easier. Nursing is a profession that values the care and competence of the individual, not the biological sex of the person providing the care.
    What exactly about this are we supposed to discuss?

    My impressions of men in nursing are that they wanted a job, it seemed doable, they had an interest, and they looked forward to the higher salaries that nursing yields compared to those with comparable education time.

    I wanted to go into mental health after doing something else for a number of years. I already had a bachelor's and some master's classes under my belt. Psychiatric NP, despite any connection to nursing, gives me more scope as a mental health provider than any other master's trained mental health provider, and it's more lucrative. A master's trained counseler doesn't make half what a NP does so from a male/bread winner perspective the latter seems an obvious choice.

    Nursing bears certain traditions and philosophies that the men I've conversed with have felt were a bit...silly and reaching. I've spoke about this with some other male nurses, as well as females, and most of the females who knew about them sided with nursing as those theories, traditions, and philosophies were means to "professionalize" nursing while men thought they were more of a defensive, foot-stamping argument so that others would see nursing as something other than hand maidens crying to be equal to others. I see it as more defensive than professional. I say to nursing to become more scientific, embrace medicine and biology rather than try to distance yourselves from it, and go to work with a focus on work. Rather than unions whining about more time off consider your work environment. Argue to hospitals that you're not there to provide room service and wont' do it. Aruge that you're there to improve the health of sick patients.

    While it's true that many men go onto administrative roles, unit "go to" people, CRNAs, and increasingly NPs they generally don't jump into academia and nursing association advancements because although men are capable nurses the philosophies of nursing don't really embrace the typical male perspective. Although men may care about their patients I don't believe they go to work to "care" as nursing proponents and philosophers interpret the word but rather to heal and earn a living. I've yet to work with another man who said, "Aww, that patient is so sweet. Let me get her some juice!"
    anotherone, kabfighter, BrandonLPN, and 2 others like this.
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    Quote from FuturePsychNP

    My impressions of men in nursing are that they wanted a job, it seemed doable, they had an interest, and they looked forward to the higher salaries that nursing yields compared to those with comparable education time.

    Nursing bears certain traditions and philosophies that the men I've conversed with have felt were a bit...silly and reaching.

    Although men may care about their patients I don't believe they go to work to "care" as nursing proponents and philosophers interpret the word but rather to heal and earn a living. I've yet to work with another man who said, "Aww, that patient is so sweet. Let me get her some juice!"
    So are you implying that females' motivations for entering the profession are intrinsically more altruistic than their male counterparts? Many of my female coworkers would cite the reasons you stated above as their motivation for becoming a nurse. I think your impression is a bit of a generalization. Personally when I was considering career choices my thought process was not "Eh I need a job, I could probably do that nursing thing, and I can make less money than an engineer, accountant, or in business"

    What certain traditions and philosophies are you referring to?

    Again, are you implying that females are intrinsically more caring then males? Are you saying that men can not "care" the same way a female does?

    I have worked with many women who have never said "Aww, that patient is so sweet. Let me get her some juice!" Or anything to that affect.
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    Welcome to AN! The largest online nursing community!

    This sounds like the beginning of a paper.....do you need a critique? Or do you just need opinions/thoughts?

    Start the dialog and we will be happy to chime in!
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    Although men may care about their patients I don't believe they go to work to "care" as nursing proponents and philosophers interpret the word but rather to heal and earn a living
    That seems a little harsh. I've worked with plenty of male nurses who are caring. Some of them just show it in a different manner than female nurses. Some are more nurturing than me.
    I enjoy having males in the nursing profession. My favroite places to work had more males on staff. They balance out the workforce and bring a different perspective that I appreciate.
    SummitRN and anotherone like this.


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