Getting a Boost Because You Are A Minority - page 3

by Clodhopper

6,244 Views | 43 Comments

Guys, 'just curious. As a minority, have you felt that maybe being a minority somehow enhanced you getting accepted into Nursing school or somehow maybe received a boost when in school? Gals: Have you ever observed any... Read More


  1. 0
    [QUOTE=Ntheboat2;7037461]
    Quote from PRICHARILLAisMISSED

    I think a male not getting preferential treatment or even equal treatment in nursing and having a problem with that would be about as silly as a male complaining that he didn't get accepted into a girls-only school. White males dominate practically everything and then want "equal treatment" or TRY to use gender to an advantage for the very, very few areas where they might be considered a minority.

    A male in the nursing world....welcome to females every day lives in all professions! (oh, except you get paid more, minority or not.)
    It is wrong to say that it's silly for a man to complain about not getting equal treatment. Not getting equal treatment based on gender is discrimination, whether you are male or female. I understand and empathize that females have been discriminated against historically, but it doesn't justify doing the same to males.
  2. 1
    Quote from Clodhopper
    Guys,
    'just curious. As a minority, have you felt that maybe being a minority somehow enhanced you getting accepted into Nursing school or somehow maybe received a boost when in school?

    Gals: Have you ever observed any specific instance or generally felt that men receive a boost in Nursing because of their minority status? Again, just curious.
    My minority status as a male got me admitted to a highly competitive nursing program. That, and scores in the 95th to 99th percentiles of the standardized admissions test and a GPA in the science pre-reqs of 3.8. . .
    PRICHARILLAisMISSED likes this.
  3. 0
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Getting a boost because you're a minority? Maybe not, but I do believe men get a boost because they're men. Even in nursing, which is (or is supposed to be) a primarily female profession, I think men get more money and more opportunities.

    My husband and I are both ICU nurses, and when we moved cross country a few years ago, I got a position at Man's Best Hospital, to start two months down the road. It wasn't easy, despite my quarter century of nursing experience and rave letters of recommendation to even get the interview. I went through all the appropriate steps -- online application and resume submission, etc. I POLISHED that resume and cover letter. I had 20 years of experience with the particular patient population, had been published writing about the patient population and had piloted a program at my previous workplace that MBH was trying to get off the ground. After three interviews, I finally got the job. After hearing me rave about the fantastic opportunity, DH called the manager of the unit where I was going to work and asked for a job. He got it.

    We started on the same day, but I was hired first and was therefore eligible for a bonus for recruiting DH. Nevertheless, they started him higher on the seniority list because it was "alphabetical." (Same last name, and my first initial preceded his.)

    I had five more years of experience as a nurse, ten more years of experience with the particular patient population and a master's degree as opposed to his associate's. He made five cents more an hour to start.

    After one year, RNs were eligible for promotion if they completed a project, joined one of the unit committees, submitted an application and supporting letters of recommendation from colleagues and taught an in-service. DH did none of those things. I did all of them. He got the promotion and the pay raise. I did not. ("Different evaluators," my manager said. "We try to be fair, but sometimes it's more subjective. You can apply again next year.")

    It's now been years. There have been several reviews, we've both had pay raises and I finally got the promotion. But because all of the pay raises are based on a percentage of your salary, he's now making over a dollar an hour more than me, and for as long as we work there that will be the case. DH is an excellent nurse, and I'm very happy for him that he's been recognized for his excellence. But the only reason HE can think of for the disparity in our salary and for his preferential treatment is that he's male.
    This is unfair on so many levels. Sorry
  4. 0
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Getting a boost because you're a minority? Maybe not, but I do believe men get a boost because they're men. Even in nursing, which is (or is supposed to be) a primarily female profession, I think men get more money and more opportunities.

    My husband and I are both ICU nurses, and when we moved cross country a few years ago, I got a position at Man's Best Hospital, to start two months down the road. It wasn't easy, despite my quarter century of nursing experience and rave letters of recommendation to even get the interview. I went through all the appropriate steps -- online application and resume submission, etc. I POLISHED that resume and cover letter. I had 20 years of experience with the particular patient population, had been published writing about the patient population and had piloted a program at my previous workplace that MBH was trying to get off the ground. After three interviews, I finally got the job. After hearing me rave about the fantastic opportunity, DH called the manager of the unit where I was going to work and asked for a job. He got it.

    We started on the same day, but I was hired first and was therefore eligible for a bonus for recruiting DH. Nevertheless, they started him higher on the seniority list because it was "alphabetical." (Same last name, and my first initial preceded his.)

    I had five more years of experience as a nurse, ten more years of experience with the particular patient population and a master's degree as opposed to his associate's. He made five cents more an hour to start.

    After one year, RNs were eligible for promotion if they completed a project, joined one of the unit committees, submitted an application and supporting letters of recommendation from colleagues and taught an in-service. DH did none of those things. I did all of them. He got the promotion and the pay raise. I did not. ("Different evaluators," my manager said. "We try to be fair, but sometimes it's more subjective. You can apply again next year.")

    It's now been years. There have been several reviews, we've both had pay raises and I finally got the promotion. But because all of the pay raises are based on a percentage of your salary, he's now making over a dollar an hour more than me, and for as long as we work there that will be the case. DH is an excellent nurse, and I'm very happy for him that he's been recognized for his excellence. But the only reason HE can think of for the disparity in our salary and for his preferential treatment is that he's male.
    It's disgusting is what it is.

    So are the people who think there is nothing wrong with it and continue to say so with their votes.
  5. 0
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    It's disgusting is what it is.

    So are the people who think there is nothing wrong with it and continue to say so with their votes.
    So then, you are saying it IS ok for females to hold an advantage to getting hired just about anywhere other than the Nursing profession, but "Disgusting" if a male has an advantage in this one field?

    Really!??!!
  6. 0
    Experientially speaking only, it seems men are tracked into management and charge nurse capacities much more quickly. It's aggravating.
  7. 0
    Quote from Guttercat
    Experientially speaking only, it seems men are tracked into management and charge nurse capacities much more quickly. It's aggravating.
    I don't doubt it, especially if you say this is from your personal experience. I'm just saying that men having an advantage in this one field should not be a problem considering we have a disadvantage in nearly all others. How women of Nursing feel about this, we've dealt with all out live in just about any other field. Does it suck for the women in this field? I'm sure it does. Is it right? No, no it isn't. But until the slate is wiped clean, and it is equal everywhere else gender wise, I think that men might as well enjoy the perk of being a minority in one of the few fields that they are not the majority in.

    Personally, I'd like for gender and race to not matter period. I wonder how women and all minorities would feel if everything was equal across the board? Well, I think we all know hte answer to that, actually. Not trying to inflame anyone, but I just choose to see things as they are, and even if its "Improper" to point something out, I will point it out anyway.
  8. 0
    Quote from PRICHARILLAisMISSED
    So then, you are saying it IS ok for females to hold an advantage to getting hired just about anywhere other than the Nursing profession, but "Disgusting" if a male has an advantage in this one field?

    Really!??!!
    WHAT are you talking about?

    That is nowhere NEAR what I said. Plus, females don't hold an advantage to getting hired "just about anywhere."

    Did you even read Ruby Vee's post to which I was replying to when I said, "it's disgusting"?

    "I had five more years of experience as a nurse, ten more years of experience with the particular patient population and a master's degree as opposed to his associate's. He made five cents more an hour to start." - Ruby Vee

    That part is gross. Not quite disgusting yet. He shouldn't have even made anywhere near as much as she should've made....much less MORE than she made. The difference between an associates and a masters is huge, but if that's not enough...she had at LEAST ten more years of experience.

    "After one year, RNs were eligible for promotion if they completed a project, joined one of the unit committees, submitted an application and supporting letters of recommendation from colleagues and taught an in-service. DH did none of those things. I did all of them. He got the promotion and the pay raise. I did not." - Ruby Vee

    THAT is disgusting. That's not even just a hiring advantage. Some companies will hire a female just to meet their affirmative action quotas, but I can guarantee you that they don't pay them more. That's a simple fact.
  9. 0
    All true. Of course it is unfair to Ruby. I am just saying that many men are "RubyVee's" in most other fields...

    I'm not saying I like it. But then again this is one field. Men get this in nearly all other fields. The injustice to RubyVee is commonplace for men everywhere ELSE
  10. 0
    Quote from PRICHARILLAisMISSED
    All true. Of course it is unfair to Ruby. I am just saying that many men are "RubyVee's" in most other fields...

    I'm not saying I like it. But then again this is one field. Men get this in nearly all other fields. The injustice to RubyVee is commonplace for men everywhere ELSE
    Oh wow....you are too far behind in what's REALLY going on in the workforce for me to even bring you up to date, much less debate the issue.

    Like I said, you're a mess.


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