Finally on the floor!!

  1. Just wanted to drop a thread in the male nurse forum telling you all that I am actually "starting" my new job tomorrow. (I have been going over policy after policy for 4 days now).

    A little background for those interested. I am a recent graduate (May 06) and took my boards in July, passed with 75 questions (thank God) and applied for a Med/Surg job in Aug. Was offered the position Aug 18, and had orientation Sep 18, sure was a long time from the interview till now. But, I finally get to make my presence on the floor now, excited and scared (of the unknowing) Everyone has told me that I may not feel comfortable at my new position for 1/2 or longer, I hope I can feel comfortable right away. I know there is still a big knowledge gap between a new nurse and an expirienced nurse, but with resources (and nice coworkers) I don't think that knowledge gap will be that big. Anyways, any advice for the first few days of "actual" work....maybe even some preceptor advice so we hit it off on the right foot right away. Thanks, nelsRN
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   Corvette Guy
    nelsRN - Congrats on your new job & good luck tomorrow!
  4. by   11:11
    Youll most likely feel "uncomfortable" for more than a few days. Ive heard of nurses that puked after shifts for months. That was never me and doesnt have to be you of course.

    If youre like anyone else youll most likey feel like you are not doing enough or forgetting something for awhile.

    Most importantly, dont kiss ass but at the same time respect your elders. In the case of an older guy like myself that can mean people half my age if they have more experience and knowledge than I do.

    Jot down some notes from the day and research them when you go home after your shift. The learning doesnt necessarliy stop when you leave the floor for the day.

    Bring some questions to your preceptor the next shift. Treat him or her with some dignity regardless...

    Not everyone on the floor is going to be nice to you. Some just eat their young or arent very pleasant people. Thats the way it is.

    Find those that will help you and go to them. Youll find who they are.

    Learn to prioritize. After time youll find your timing, that comes with experience.

    Work hard and study and youll do just fine Im sure-

    Break a leg

    11
  5. by   SteveNNP
    Welcome! Best of luck as you start your career!

    Just a tip from someone who's only been at this game for a year and a half....

    -stay teachable..... even if you know you're darn good at what you do, or have all the right answers, there's always something new to learn. Nurses out there have some great stuff to teach us, if we are humble and stay teachable....


    Good Luck!

    Steve
  6. by   Larry77
    Quote from SteveRN21

    -stay teachable..... even if you know you're darn good at what you do, or have all the right answers, there's always something new to learn. Nurses out there have some great stuff to teach us, if we are humble and stay teachable....

    Steve
    Good advice even for seasoned nurses!
  7. by   Tweety
    I agree, great advice about being humble and teachable...........something (please don't flame me, or flame me, I can take it) male nurses aren't always willing to do.

    Expecting yourself to feel "comfortable right away" may not happen either, but remember it's o.k. to be nervous and unsure of yourself, along with a healthy dose of self-esteem and self-confidence.

    Good luck!
  8. by   nursemike
    Quote from Tweety
    I agree, great advice about being humble and teachable...........something (please don't flame me, or flame me, I can take it) male nurses aren't always willing to do.

    Expecting yourself to feel "comfortable right away" may not happen either, but remember it's o.k. to be nervous and unsure of yourself, along with a healthy dose of self-esteem and self-confidence.

    Good luck!
    I don't think cockiness (pun not entirely unintended) has much to do with gender, but I concur with the great advice.

    One thing I picked up from one of my mentors is that it's okay to feel hard-pressed to keep up, at times. I still have what I call "character-building" moments, but I truly think stretching my abilities is one of the best ways to learn. Of course, it's important to distinguish between times when one is a bit stretched keeping up with routine stuff and times when one is over one's head. I've also learned a good little bit in situations where a patient was in more trouble than I was really equipped to handle, but I learned by calling in more capable back-up (usually starting with the charge nurse) and then hanging in there, doing what I could, and watching what I couldn't do, even though what I wanted to do was hide in the med room.

    The first year is hell, but you learn a hell of a lot.

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