EMT Starting RN program anyone else go down this road?

  1. 0
    I started an EMT course 2 years ago and my original goal was to become a firefighter, but the longer I worked as an EMT the more I realized that RN would be a better fit for me. I'm currently 21 and hopefully if my loans get approved ill be starting a BSN RN program. Just was wondering if anyone got into medical to be a firefighter and found out that RN was a way better fit for them than fire.

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  2. 44 Comments...

  3. 1
    I went paramedic (still am) to RN. Has worked out great for me. Good luck.
    LexRaven likes this.
  4. 4
    I was an EMT for two years before nursing school. It helped, I had the study skills I needed and the NREMT exam is similar in the way the questions are written the the NCLEX. My advice to you is this. Remember that EMS and nursing share some skills but take completely different approaches to patent care philosophies. Your assessment skills will be top notch, but realize you can't make a bed or give a bath well. That was one of the most frustrating parts of school for me, as me to assess, medicate, or do a procedure and I was ok. Change a brief or a bed and it never seemed to go right. Also don't announce the fact that your an EMT. Don't keep it a secret, don't lie if asked, but some instructors will be harder on you because of your EMS background.
    puncho72, Orca, EMTJeremy, and 1 other like this.
  5. 0
    Quote from big al lpn
    Also don't announce the fact that your an EMT. Don't keep it a secret, don't lie if asked, but some instructors will be harder on you because of your EMS background.
    This is good advise, EMT, CNA's are better off not letting students or professors know backgrounds. Some professors see you as possible know it alls.
  6. 0
    I too am an EMT. I just started nursing school and it is a completely different animal then being in the field.

    You will be asked by Professors a lot of questions that you have already learned to become and EMT.

    Go for it if it is what your heart desires. In short, I love it.
  7. 0
    I enjoy being the Professor's "go to" student. I get all the cool patients because my Professors do not think the other students can handle it.
  8. 0
    I have been a volunteer EMT for two years and that inspired me to make a career change to nursing. I was a college administrator with an MBA, so it's a big change! I've spent the past three semesters doing my prereqs, and am starting a master's entry program in August. I, too, have been warned about keeping my EMS experience on the down low. I can understand why, although I do hope it helps some. Best wishes to you!
  9. 1
    I'm a medic and am in the middle of nursing school now. You didn't specify medic so I'll assume you're a basic, if that's the case then you got nothing to worry about. Sometimes it will help, sometimes you will be on the same level as those around you. Biggest advice I can give is learn the nurse way of doing things, EMT/Medic overlap nursing in several areas but they are very different and your instructors will want to see you do it their way. Best not to ruffle the feathers of those evaluating you. Good luck.
    SodaPop likes this.
  10. 1
    I wish you all the best Deuceswild1. I became an EMT in 2009 with the goal of becoming a firefighter as a second career as I was under 30 at the time. My plan was to get my experience as an EMT, become a volunteer with the fire service, go to medic school, and get into a fire department here in California. As I got into the field and met and talked to others with similar goals and direction, I quickly discovered the potential challenges with that path. For one, in California, the fire department is extremely, highly competitive. I heard plenty of stories about individuals that did everything right, became medics, paid $1000's for fire science courses and academies, yet were never picked up by a department. Many end up as medics on a private ambulance making $16/hr. after a decade of dedication or so with limited options for advancement. Anything is possible, yet I didn't like the idea of gambling with my career and livelihood. At the time, I thought I had everything going for me, I knew the fire chief for a large department, I had friends that were firefighters and an uncle that was retired and well-known with the Orange County department. Turns out none of this could even help me become a volunteer with a major department, as even that level was highly competitive at the time with individuals showing up with AA degrees in fire science and multiple fire academy certificates and experience.

    At the same time I was working nights as an EMT on an ambulance and was in and out of emergency rooms. I truly had no real idea of what nursing was all about until I was in that environment. There, I truly discovered nursing for the first time. Perhaps I was also somewhat ignorant prior to this as well, as I never really considered nursing as a male career, never having spent much time in a hospital, but there in the ER in some locations half of the nurses were male. It was then that I truly considered nursing as a viable career. Researching the profession, I saw nursing as a definite career path. You get the education and credentials, you get the job. It was a sure thing with no great risk of not making it due to outside factors or luck or whatever. Not to mention the pay in most areas is great, it is also a career that like the fire department delivers a lot of personal satisfaction, and also offers a lot of flexibility in scheduling as well as mobility. What's not to like?

    In any case, I just graduated with my BSN about 2 weeks ago and passed the NCLEX last week, and I couldn't be happier with my choice. Now to find a job... I hope my experience gives you some insight in choosing your path. Best of luck in determining you future!
    Deuceswild1 likes this.
  11. 0
    Quote from rskopek
    I wish you all the best Deuceswild1. I became an EMT in 2009 with the goal of becoming a firefighter as a second career as I was under 30 at the time. My plan was to get my experience as an EMT, become a volunteer with the fire service, go to medic school, and get into a fire department here in California. As I got into the field and met and talked to others with similar goals and direction, I quickly discovered the potential challenges with that path. For one, in California, the fire department is extremely, highly competitive. I heard plenty of stories about individuals that did everything right, became medics, paid $1000's for fire science courses and academies, yet were never picked up by a department. Many end up as medics on a private ambulance making $16/hr. after a decade of dedication or so with limited options for advancement. Anything is possible, yet I didn't like the idea of gambling with my career and livelihood. At the time, I thought I had everything going for me, I knew the fire chief for a large department, I had friends that were firefighters and an uncle that was retired and well-known with the Orange County department. Turns out none of this could even help me become a volunteer with a major department, as even that level was highly competitive at the time with individuals showing up with AA degrees in fire science and multiple fire academy certificates and experience.

    At the same time I was working nights as an EMT on an ambulance and was in and out of emergency rooms. I truly had no real idea of what nursing was all about until I was in that environment. There, I truly discovered nursing for the first time. Perhaps I was also somewhat ignorant prior to this as well, as I never really considered nursing as a male career, never having spent much time in a hospital, but there in the ER in some locations half of the nurses were male. It was then that I truly considered nursing as a viable career. Researching the profession, I saw nursing as a definite career path. You get the education and credentials, you get the job. It was a sure thing with no great risk of not making it due to outside factors or luck or whatever. Not to mention the pay in most areas is great, it is also a career that like the fire department delivers a lot of personal satisfaction, and also offers a lot of flexibility in scheduling as well as mobility. What's not to like?

    In any case, I just graduated with my BSN about 2 weeks ago and passed the NCLEX last week, and I couldn't be happier with my choice. Now to find a job... I hope my experience gives you some insight in choosing your path. Best of luck in determining you future!
    Thanks man your situation is almost creepy because it is so similar to mine.


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