EMT Starting RN program anyone else go down this road? - page 3

by Deuceswild1 11,567 Views | 43 Comments

I started an EMT course 2 years ago and my original goal was to become a firefighter, but the longer I worked as an EMT the more I realized that RN would be a better fit for me. I'm currently 21 and hopefully if my loans get... Read More


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    I was an EMT/ ER Tech. Best 2 years of experience I could ask for. I got so much experience in the ED, I'm way ahead others in school, and the teachers and classmates notice. Sure, I get made fun of for my constant "this one time in the ER..." stories, but its all in good fun. I agree with the others- EMS is definitely different, but the skills you learn are often an asset, no matter where you work. No offense to RNs out there, but have you ever seen a nurse try to backboard someone? Its just a different specialty with a different skill set.

    Its interesting, the more EMS work I did, the more I loved working in the field and questioned my RN career. Well, my roommate, who is just finishing his medic program after giving up on nursing, said he doesn't really see a good future for himself. Around here all we have is fire-based EMS, so to be a medic in the field (ie: not doing general transport), you need to get on with Phoenix Fire or surrounding crews.

    I think you're making a good call by going for the RN. Hey, in some states, you can actually challenge the NREMT-P and get your medic after your RN to have both. Makes an easy second gig for overtime and stuff (actually heard that from a FF when we got to discussing our careers on a call once). I'm looking into doing this when I'm done in May. It also helps with getting a flight nurse job if that's a route you'd like to pursue.

    Good luck bro!
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    I was (and still am) a volunteer EMT and fire fighter. The patient care experience you get as an EMT is valuable in nursing however, as others have noted, the scope of practice between the two is very different.
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    I am currently trying to apply for a position with the Police Department as a Tactical Medic for SWAT... My credentials include (POST (Peace Officer Standard Training Cert.), EMT, RN BSN)... I hope I can score that position... Being an EMT does open doors for ya...
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    Have you seen the movie nemesis. Im a trekker so I bring this up because of those final minutes in the movie. When commander Riker (now captain of his well deserved ship) aproached capt Picard for his permission to disembark. He look his mentor in the eyes, heartwarmly saying " serving with you this 15 years had been an honor". Well I have been a paramedic since 1991. Got promoted to field supervisor on 2005. In 2012 I began my ASN knowing BSN is my next stop. Being a paramedic has been a honor. But now my last few years Insted of risking injury in the streets I prefers to bring my prehospital know hows to hospital setting. As a student I didnt keep secret my 20+ years of service. I help my profesors aiding them with pt care prehospital perspectives. Help my costudent with their inquiries sharing my street savvy methods of getting the most of hx taking. I know its not exatly the same as a paramedic while conducting a medical interview the surrondigns of the patients also give information regarding the chief complain. At a hospital a nurse just have the word of the pt or a next of kin. Well just wanted to share my view. Im still workin 40hrs a week as supervisor for third service for the goverment of PR. Hoping to get a job in SJ VA. If get the job then I ll start my BSN. My challenge for now is decidng if ER is the place to be or ICU . Teaching is appealing to. But for now I'll let universe unfolds as it should.
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    I was an EMT for a long time. Recently finished my ADN. It's worth it but its a different frame of mind. Be prepared to be flexible. Your EMT will help a lot to get hired and to get a jump start in the nursing program.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
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    Currently I'm a basic EMT with just a few months to recert. I'm taking my last round of pre req before applying to nursing school. I've been reading your comments I'm basicly making the move just like many have said before. I've always wanted to be a medic but right now I'm thinking about stability for a family. RN's that I know say once you start then you'll love it and you'll be able to travel which I can do as a medic. I'M concerned about hitting a ceiling and not able to move up but as a nurse I can at least be a PA or NP which make pretty good money. Just feeling a bit torn I iust dont wanna be a medic any longer I dont have any drive when I talk about it anymore.
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    Emt /paramedic currently finished my first semester of nursing school. Real life experience bones me and like you've probably already read, its a whole separate frame of mind and approach to medicine and patients. You're gonna be focusing more on a patients chief complaint and not so much on their conditions or symptoms. Its challenging but not at all impossible. Good luck
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    I've been an EMT for 13 years and had my ff 1&2 cert for 10. Just finished my pre req's and took my entrance exam for An Adn program. Hoping to get my acceptance email this afternoon!! I've been told my prehospital experience will help with getting a job just hoping it doesn't get me singled out too much in class. Some of my instructors that new my background singled me out some in my pre req classes but all of the experiences with that have been good so far. I think the experience and networking from years of EMS will be a very good thing to bring with you in a nursing career.
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    Quote from sheepeggsandham
    I've been an EMT for 13 years and had my ff 1&2 cert for 10. Just finished my pre req's and took my entrance exam for An Adn program. Hoping to get my acceptance email this afternoon!! I've been told my prehospital experience will help with getting a job just hoping it doesn't get me singled out too much in class. Some of my instructors that new my background singled me out some in my pre req classes but all of the experiences with that have been good so far. I think the experience and networking from years of EMS will be a very good thing to bring with you in a nursing career.
    Never volunteer that information lol. Telling instructors I was a medic was a bad idea lol I get asked every question and held to a higher standard. Its not that I'm not up to the challenge but I'm just a medic..if I knew all the answers and how to be a nurse already I wouldn't be in school get off my back xD
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    Quote from EMTJeremy
    I was an EMT/ ER Tech. Best 2 years of experience I could ask for. I got so much experience in the ED, I'm way ahead others in school, and the teachers and classmates notice. Sure, I get made fun of for my constant "this one time in the ER..." stories, but its all in good fun. I agree with the others- EMS is definitely different, but the skills you learn are often an asset, no matter where you work. No offense to RNs out there, but have you ever seen a nurse try to backboard someone? Its just a different specialty with a different skill set.
    I guess this post illustrates all of what not to do if you want to be an RN. EMT and Paramedic are both "tech" jobs. Both are very easy certs to get and you will be surprised by how many people, both health care and non health care, have these certs. Some even took an EMT class in high school at 16 years old. EMS has not advanced much in 50 years except to add a few new toys but without much education to go with it. Boy Scouts also get similar if not more first aid training than most EMTs. Sometimes your stories from an EMT-BASIC viewpoint might seem funny especially to those who have taken all the prerequisites and have expanded their knowledge. Some RNs who had been EMTs or Paramedics are even embarrassed later when they have more education and training by their attitudes when they worked the ambulances or they see the cocky attitudes of EMTs doing the us vs them crap in the ED.

    We could use the backboard as an example. This is something not used in the hospital for the same reasons EMS is getting away from it. The difference is the hospitals knew this long, long time ago. No need to teach "backboarding" when hospitals have many other spinal immobilization techniques and devices which EMTs have never heard of. The reason some patients still stay on the backboards in the hospital ED now is because of EMTs and Paramedics getting their knickers in a knot every time a doctor would ask do a quick assessment of the patient and yank the backboard out from under the patient. Believe it or not but that assessment is similar to the one now some Paramedics are doing to prevent putting the patient on a backboard. But, even today you get EMTs and Paramedics screaming foul when their patient is removed from a backboard upon arrival at the ED. It got so bad a few years ago when EMTs and Paramedics went to their Medical Directors and even the media to cry about all their hard work of backboarding and their assessment (per protocol to backboard everyone) was "ignored" by hospitals that some hospitals just now keep the patients backboards to avoid more outrage and threats of telling the patients/families to sue from the EMTs and Paramedics.

    So you see, what you do in EMS may not be appropriate for the long term and is sometimes just outdated. All those new gadgets like CPAP, may have been used for over 70 years in a hospital. You also learn you DO NOT talk about patients you have seen to others. At some point you cross the line of patient privacy and your teachers will try to change this or just weed you out because patients' need to feel they can have their privacy without fear someone is going to blab it around town.

    I also find this thread to be funny since it is in the "men in nursing" section like it is assuming all EMTs are male and all nurses are female. This is something else to get over.

    It is good to have some fond memories of your first entry level job but when it is time you move on, don't continue to live in the past. Learn to learn. Be more receptive of new things.


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