Doc Wannabe?

  1. 0
    Another poster suggested this thread: Did you (or do you) want to be a doctor?

    I never did, but since I've been in nursing school, I've begun to think if I were younger, I would think hard about it. I prefer the nursing model in many ways, but noticed in careplanning that I found it tough to focus on nursing diagnoses and not get all caught up in the medical ones. Of course, there was a time when a nurse was just about the last thing I could imagine myself being, so I'm learning to never say never.

    I do think nursing might be just about ideal for pre-med. A lot of docs could probably profit from seeing the other side.
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  5. 0
    Quote from nursemike?
    Another poster suggested this thread: Did you (or do you) want to be a doctor?

    I never did, but since I've been in nursing school, I've begun to think if I were younger, I would think hard about it. I prefer the nursing model in many ways, but noticed in careplanning that I found it tough to focus on nursing diagnoses and not get all caught up in the medical ones. Of course, there was a time when a nurse was just about the last thing I could imagine myself being, so I'm learning to never say never.

    I do think nursing might be just about ideal for pre-med. A lot of docs could probably profit from seeing the other side.
    NurseMike...

    I dunno... I see Doc's with their finger up someone's back side far more than I do nursing. I'm happy where I am.
  6. 1
    Quote from AzMichelle
    NurseMike...

    I dunno... I see Doc's with their finger up someone's back side far more than I do nursing. I'm happy where I am.
    Please don't remind me. Turns out, my prostate is okay. I'm glad, but it occurs to me I'd be no worse off not knowing my prostate was okay. If it wasn't okay, I'd be better off finding out sooner than later, but as long as it is okay, I don't need to know.
    I've been violated.
    Yes, I do realize this is yet another area where men have it easier than women. It still sucks. Plus, it's just a matter of time before the crazy s.o.b. wants to do a colonoscopy.
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
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    Quote from nursemike?
    Please don't remind me. Turns out, my prostate is okay. I'm glad, but it occurs to me I'd be no worse off not knowing my prostate was okay. If it wasn't okay, I'd be better off finding out sooner than later, but as long as it is okay, I don't need to know.
    I've been violated.
    Yes, I do realize this is yet another area where men have it easier than women. It still sucks. Plus, it's just a matter of time before the crazy s.o.b. wants to do a colonoscopy.
    Yes yes! Never forget that! You may feel violated but it doesn't compare to a GYN exam! And you bellyache about a colonoscopy, we get GYN exams AND a colonoscopy! :chuckle
  8. 0
    I had to transport a patient once for a double endoscopy (upper and lower GI). I'm told the experience is every bit as enjoyable as it sounds.

    The more I think about it, I might not be sadistic enough to be a doctor. Heck, I have to work pretty hard at being sadistic enough to be a nurse.
  9. 1
    hey boyz, i'll be the first to admit it....

    i am a doc wannabe. the first step is admitting it. but i simply cannot fathom the thought of finishing prereq's, mcat's, med school, internship, and residency.

    so i decided being a nurse was a better suit to wear.

    i hate to pull a kerry, but let me qualify, i want the knowledge/experience of a doctor. but i don't want to be an arrogant prick. i also do not mean to degrade the field of nursing in any way, or elevate physicians in any way.

    btw....has anybody heard an FUNNY male nursing jokes. i hear jokes all the time and they are never funny, never. i am also i vegetarian and NEVER hear any funny jokes, though i hear jokes all the time.
    serratus anterior likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from nursemike?
    Another poster suggested this thread: Did you (or do you) want to be a doctor?

    I never did, but since I've been in nursing school, I've begun to think if I were younger, I would think hard about it. I prefer the nursing model in many ways, but noticed in careplanning that I found it tough to focus on nursing diagnoses and not get all caught up in the medical ones. Of course, there was a time when a nurse was just about the last thing I could imagine myself being, so I'm learning to never say never.

    I do think nursing might be just about ideal for pre-med. A lot of docs could probably profit from seeing the other side.
    I originally wanted to do the pre-med route while I was taking my pre-reqs for the BSN program I'm in now. I never saw myself as a nurse but I felt it was a great way to be involved in healthcare and was practical, since many who apply to med school don't get accepted and have nothing to fall back on but a Biology degree (I would never want to be a lab tech).

    I am still doing my pre-med on the side and will take the MCAT and apply about two or three years after graduation (that will give me time to pay off my school loans and take the rest of my pre-med courses at a easier pace).

    If I don't get in, oh well--at least I tried. I could still probably get into a D.O. (osteopathic doctor) school and become a doctor that way or do the CRNA (nurse anesthetist) thing.

    Doing your premed will give you more options. I recommend you do the pre-med, take the MCAT and see how you do. If the scores and grades are decent enough, apply. Aways keep your options open.

    Nothing wrong with being a nurse, but if that isn't truly what you want to do, then move on. There will always be people out their that are called to nursing. Don't feel like you have to stay with it just because there is a shortage, or because they need more men. You will get alot of crap from other nurses once they find out you want to leave the profession to go into medicine, the profession that they feel has perpetuated their low public status as female handmaidens, but you have to do what is right for you. I think nursing is a great stepping stone for med school, although it is also a career track in itself.

    I remember my community college counselor once asked me, " If you were independently wealthy and never had to work , what would you want to do for the rest of your life?" I didn't have an answer at the time. As I continue with my studies, and reflect on my own experiences and desire to always learn and be challenged, the more and more I find medicine fitting the bill.

    If there is a will, there is a way!
  11. 0
    Quote from USFguy
    I originally wanted to do the pre-med route while I was taking my pre-reqs for the BSN program I'm in now. I never saw myself as a nurse but I felt it was a great way to be involved in healthcare and was practical, since many who apply to med school don't get accepted and have nothing to fall back on but a Biology degree (I would never want to be a lab tech).

    I am still doing my pre-med on the side and will take the MCAT and apply about two or three years after graduation (that will give me time to pay off my school loans and take the rest of my pre-med courses at a easier pace).

    If I don't get in, oh well--at least I tried. I could still probably get into a D.O. (osteopathic doctor) school and become a doctor that way or do the CRNA (nurse anesthetist) thing.

    Doing your premed will give you more options. I recommend you do the pre-med, take the MCAT and see how you do. If the scores and grades are decent enough, apply. Aways keep your options open.

    Nothing wrong with being a nurse, but if that isn't truly what you want to do, then move on. There will always be people out their that are called to nursing. Don't feel like you have to stay with it just because there is a shortage, or because they need more men. You will get alot of crap from other nurses once they find out you want to leave the profession to go into medicine, the profession that they feel has perpetuated their low public status as female handmaidens, but you have to do what is right for you. I think nursing is a great stepping stone for med school, although it is also a career track in itself.

    I remember my community college counselor once asked me, " If you were independently wealthy and never had to work , what would you want to do for the rest of your life?" I didn't have an answer at the time. As I continue with my studies, and reflect on my own experiences and desire to always learn and be challenged, the more and more I find medicine fitting the bill.

    If there is a will, there is a way!
    Interesting post. For myself, I think nursing is going to be the way to go, and I didn't mean to suggest I was "settling" for it. I do admire doctors' knowledge and envy their autonomy, but I see plenty of room to grow in both through nursing, too.
    A couple of my instructors have spoken of the "medical model" in tones that border on disparaging, at times, but I'm sure they recognize it has its place. Pretty much all of my instructors speak positively of "science-based nursing."
    In fact, I've had moments when I had to think pretty hard to come up with a scientific rationale for an intervention that, in reality, just felt intuitively like the right thing to do.
    I guess I'm just saying I see good points about nursing and medicine.
    A friend of mine is planning to use nursing as a stepping stone to veternary medicine. I don't see anything really wrong with that, although I do advise her not to say so too openly in the company of other nurses.
  12. 0
    Quote from nursemike?
    Interesting post. For myself, I think nursing is going to be the way to go, and I didn't mean to suggest I was "settling" for it. I do admire doctors' knowledge and envy their autonomy, but I see plenty of room to grow in both through nursing, too.
    A couple of my instructors have spoken of the "medical model" in tones that border on disparaging, at times, but I'm sure they recognize it has its place. Pretty much all of my instructors speak positively of "science-based nursing."
    In fact, I've had moments when I had to think pretty hard to come up with a scientific rationale for an intervention that, in reality, just felt intuitively like the right thing to do.
    I guess I'm just saying I see good points about nursing and medicine.
    A friend of mine is planning to use nursing as a stepping stone to veternary medicine. I don't see anything really wrong with that, although I do advise her not to say so too openly in the company of other nurses.
    I just can't remain in an ancillary position for the rest of my life. As a nurse I will always an assistant in the healing process of the patient. I want to be leader of the pack. I understand advanced practice nurses have more autonomy, etc. but they will always, in reality, be mid-level practitioners. I want the power, responsibility, authority, education, and suffice to say--financial compensation of a physician. I don't just want to care and nurture, I want to cure. Nursing cannot offer me these things.

    When I am in my clinical laboratory, I find myself constantly wanted to know more about the disease process and I am consistently told by my professors "you won't need to know that." I want to know it!

    Nursing care is the backbone of healthcare, hands down. The caring and nurturing patients receive from professional nurses is by no doubt equally important to the care provided by the physician. I just feel that my deeper inquiries into the nature of disease and the physiological response to infirmity lie more within the realm of medicine than nursing.
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    Quote from USFguy

    Nursing care is the backbone of healthcare, hands down. The caring and nurturing patients receive from professional nurses is by no doubt equally important to the care provided by the physician. I just feel that my deeper inquiries into the nature of disease and the physiological response to infirmity lie more within the realm of medicine than nursing.
    Sounds like you're going to make a really fine doctor.


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