Doc Wannabe? - page 2

Another poster suggested this thread: Did you (or do you) want to be a doctor? I never did, but since I've been in nursing school, I've begun to think if I were younger, I would think hard about... Read More

  1. by   USFguy
    Quote from computronic2040
    I graduated from USF w/ an anthro/intl. studies degree, went back for pre-med and gave a pretty lackluster performance. I am still interested in public health and effecting change in the health at the macro level. But loans need to be repaid and nursing is a great segue into greater things.
    Are talking about University of San Francisco (where I go) or University of South Florida? I get alot of people thinking USF stands for the latter. I think there is also a University of Saint Francis, which makes thing even more complicated.

    GO DONS!!
  2. by   Ottalie
    I'm certainly a doc wanna be. I even went to talk with the pre-med advisor at the college where I'm working on my BSN. Sadly, he was very discouraging and pointed out my age. (25 is NOT too old to start thinking about med school, in my humble opinion)

    Then I went to speak with another college about their MSN/FNP program. They welcomed me with open arms; almost like they can't wait to get me in! So at this point I figure I'll get my FNP. If that doesn't fit, then I'll go back to my original plan of going to DO school.

    Personally, I think you should go where your heart leads. If nursing is not where you want to be, then by all means find your true passion and go for it.

    Otta
  3. by   nursemike
    Quote from Ottalie
    I'm certainly a doc wanna be. I even went to talk with the pre-med advisor at the college where I'm working on my BSN. Sadly, he was very discouraging and pointed out my age. (25 is NOT too old to start thinking about med school, in my humble opinion)

    Then I went to speak with another college about their MSN/FNP program. They welcomed me with open arms; almost like they can't wait to get me in! So at this point I figure I'll get my FNP. If that doesn't fit, then I'll go back to my original plan of going to DO school.

    Personally, I think you should go where your heart leads. If nursing is not where you want to be, then by all means find your true passion and go for it.

    Otta
    There was a resident at my hospital who was well into his 40's. My Dad's PCP isn't old, but he was a Marine before medical school, so he wasn't a baby when he started. I'll be 48 when I get my ASN--age is certainly a consideration in my future plans, but if I really wanted to be a doctor, it wouldn't stop me. (In all likelihood, as BSN will be my terminal degree, but one of my instructors is finishing her masters in her 50's, and that doesn't seem stupid. Heck, I can imagine being a lawyer, after my nursing career.)
  4. by   windsurfr
    USFguy-
    There is no real difference between the DO and the "medical model". The "medical model" that is thrown around so much is simply to acquire a very detailed knowledge of normal human anatomy/physiology/histology/etc. Then using that you learn the fundimentals of disease processes/pharmacology/etc. Then the third and fourth years you learn to diagnose and the basics of treatment formulation.
    The ONLY formal difference between MD and DO training is that DO's have a bit more experience with 'manipulation'. But since the evidence base of manipulation is dwindling, they are getting taught less and less.
    This idea that MD students learn the 'medical model' and DO's learn a more holistic approach is simply not true. That is used by DO admissions to recruit students, but once you actually talk to DO students you will realize there is no difference.
    There is no real difference between MD and DO. DO school is traditionally easier to get into because not as many people are aware of it. But once you are in it will be just as demanding as an MD program.
  5. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from Ottalie
    I'm certainly a doc wanna be. I even went to talk with the pre-med advisor at the college where I'm working on my BSN. Sadly, he was very discouraging and pointed out my age. (25 is NOT too old to start thinking about med school, in my humble opinion)

    Then I went to speak with another college about their MSN/FNP program. They welcomed me with open arms; almost like they can't wait to get me in! So at this point I figure I'll get my FNP. If that doesn't fit, then I'll go back to my original plan of going to DO school.

    Personally, I think you should go where your heart leads. If nursing is not where you want to be, then by all means find your true passion and go for it.

    Otta


    It has been my experience that many folks who call themselves college advisors, especially pre-med advisors often know least about the process. They are not as knowledable about the pre-med process from a nontraditional students standpoint. They tend to emphasis the obvious and point out factors that may knock an applicant out of the running. I suppose that it so the person stays realistic.

    BUT WHO CARES ABOUT BEING A REALIST???

    25 is certainly not too old! I agree.
    I also applaud your choice to become an NP.

    Here are a few websites you may enjoy:
    The Society of Non-Traditional Medical and Pre-Medical Students
    http://www.oldpremeds.net/


    The Student Doctor Network
    http://www.studentdoctor.net/
    (Some of the topics on SDN can be nurse-unfriendly, but it is a good pre-med resource)

    The American College of Nurse Practitioners
    http://www.nurse.org/acnp/index.shtml

    The American Academy of Nurse Practitioners
    http://www.aanp.org/default.asp

    Agape
  6. by   Ottalie
    Quote from windsurfr
    USFguy-
    There is no real difference between the DO and the "medical model". The "medical model" that is thrown around so much is simply to acquire a very detailed knowledge of normal human anatomy/physiology/histology/etc. Then using that you learn the fundimentals of disease processes/pharmacology/etc. Then the third and fourth years you learn to diagnose and the basics of treatment formulation.
    The ONLY formal difference between MD and DO training is that DO's have a bit more experience with 'manipulation'. But since the evidence base of manipulation is dwindling, they are getting taught less and less.
    This idea that MD students learn the 'medical model' and DO's learn a more holistic approach is simply not true. That is used by DO admissions to recruit students, but once you actually talk to DO students you will realize there is no difference.
    There is no real difference between MD and DO. DO school is traditionally easier to get into because not as many people are aware of it. But once you are in it will be just as demanding as an MD program.
    One little thing to point out about MD vs. DO- true, that DOs study manipulation, and the study is becoming less and less prevelant.
    One of the biggest differences comes down to clinical time while in school. MD students are generally affiliated with a large university hospital, DOs are not. DO students spend more time in rural hospitals and clinics. Most DOs work in IM or GP, although they are not restricted to those residencies.

    You are right though, the education is basically the same, and just as demanding.

    Otta
  7. by   menetopali
    Ott,

    25 isn't to old for med school. look at the average age at entry for many schools and its around 24. sombody has to be pulling that age up away from all those 22 year olds. i'm thirty and hoping to start a program in two years (one year to finish up prereqs and take the MCAT and one year interviewing and hoping to get a slot). besides, life experience and real-time experience in health care are both important to selection boards, or so says the 'get into med school' books.
  8. by   Trixiebell
    hi
    so i'm a girl and maybe should not be posting here, but this caught my eye, i'm a first yr med student and just about to switch into nursing (grad program in australia, dont know what you guys call it, ill be an RN)...
    i love the knowledge that comes with med, love the diagnosis, and hate not having time for patients or for me or my family...the 80 hour weeks in residency are considered just normal...maybe for a single person its okay...but i'm getting married, will have kids by then and have a brother i raised whose still at home with me...and im not up for never seeing them
    thats just my two cents...
    (although i now cop some serious grief, for selling out and going for the girly field...whatever that is meant to mean! ive been told that im a disapointment to everything that femenists fought for...i was always under the impression women fought for choice, but turns out i might be wrong...apparently we fought for choice as long as we went with the choice that puts our career ahead of everything else in life )
    nighty night
    elle
  9. by   nursemike
    Quote from Trixiebell
    hi
    so i'm a girl and maybe should not be posting here, but this caught my eye, i'm a first yr med student and just about to switch into nursing (grad program in australia, dont know what you guys call it, ill be an RN)...
    i love the knowledge that comes with med, love the diagnosis, and hate not having time for patients or for me or my family...the 80 hour weeks in residency are considered just normal...maybe for a single person its okay...but i'm getting married, will have kids by then and have a brother i raised whose still at home with me...and im not up for never seeing them
    thats just my two cents...
    (although i now cop some serious grief, for selling out and going for the girly field...whatever that is meant to mean! ive been told that im a disapointment to everything that femenists fought for...i was always under the impression women fought for choice, but turns out i might be wrong...apparently we fought for choice as long as we went with the choice that puts our career ahead of everything else in life )
    nighty night
    elle
    Hmm. It didn't even occur to me that I was being sexist putting this thread on a male forum. I'm sure a lot of women get asked why a nurse instead of a doctor. But it does seem kind of inevitable, if you're a dude.
    I agree with your idea of feminism. I have a cousin who got a lot of her height at an early age. I used to drive her to cheerleading practice and went to most of her games with her. I asked her one day if she had ever had any interest in playing basketball, instead of cheering for it. She told her friends, "He wants me to play basketball, because I'm tall." I wanted her to know she had the choice, but cheerleading was what she liked, and that was great. Much cuter uniforms, too.
    Anyway, best of luck with your choice. I'm sure we all have our reasons for choosing nursing, and an honorable choice it is. I think we can also all agree that there ain't nothin' dainty or frilly about nursing. One of my favorite things about healthcare is the company of smart, practical women who know how to roll up their sleeves and get things done.
    Nursing was feminist when feminism wasn't cool.
  10. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from Trixiebell
    hi
    so i'm a girl and maybe should not be posting here, but this caught my eye, i'm a first yr med student and just about to switch into nursing (grad program in australia, dont know what you guys call it, ill be an RN)...
    i love the knowledge that comes with med, love the diagnosis, and hate not having time for patients or for me or my family...the 80 hour weeks in residency are considered just normal...maybe for a single person its okay...but i'm getting married, will have kids by then and have a brother i raised whose still at home with me...and im not up for never seeing them
    thats just my two cents...
    (although i now cop some serious grief, for selling out and going for the girly field...whatever that is meant to mean! ive been told that im a disapointment to everything that femenists fought for...i was always under the impression women fought for choice, but turns out i might be wrong...apparently we fought for choice as long as we went with the choice that puts our career ahead of everything else in life )
    nighty night
    elle
    Tell 'em to "stick it" Elle. It is your choice and if you choose nursing, Then GOOD FOR YOU!


  11. by   Trixiebell
    Quote from nursemike?
    Hmm. It didn't even occur to me that I was being sexist putting this thread on a male forum. I'm sure a lot of women get asked why a nurse instead of a doctor. But it does seem kind of inevitable, if you're a dude.
    i didnt think it was esp. sexist, i suspect you guys get asked this a lot...what always drove me mad was when people asked me what i did, i said i was a med student and they invariable said, oh you'll be a nurse then?
    i find it amazing that its 2005 and we still think guys should be docs and girls be nurses...maybe its not so bad in america (fingers crossed) but down here i think we can be a bit, oh banish the though, chauvanistic?
    if people are really thinking about going into med though, think LONG and HARD...its not all its cracked up to be, i know its seen as this wonderful thing to do, but in all honesty it can be really frustrating, really long and it will take over your entire life from the day get go (i think im vitamin d deficient from never seeing the sunlight...)...
    off to class to learn all about lymph notes :uhoh21:
  12. by   Pacs, RN
    When I was young, I wanted to become a doctor. I took up nursing as a pre-medical course just so I can step into med school. And now that I am a medical student, it is only now that I realize that I REALLY LOVE NURSING.

    I told this to a friend and a colleague of mine. She said she suddenly imagined me as someone who gives the medical orders and then carrying them out at the same time. We both laughed at the thought but then again, I love both Nursing and Medicine. I plan to keep my RN title when I finally become a doctor: an RN, MD like my mentor in nursing school. I'll never forget my nursing origins.

    I am a doctor because I want to cure but I am also a nurse because I care.
  13. by   mofomeat
    Nice six year thread dredge :thu:

    I was actually coming here to post a similar topic to the one of the OP. I too occasionally muse about becoming a doctor instead. You know, 'take it all the way'.

    I think I could do it, but deep down inside i think i believe that I'm more cut out for nursing than being a doctor. For starters, I'm pushing 40 now. The age itself won't stop me from doing it, but it does mean I'll spend a good portion of my remaining working life in school. Secondly, I might be wishing to be a doctor for all the wrong reasons. While I find medicine and medical care fascinating as all get out, I think walking around in a white coat might go to my head.
    Finally, while I think I've got the smarts for med school, I don't think I have the mental stamina for it. There is simply mindblowing amounts of data to be rote learned and memorized, and I don't think I could stay motivated for several years of that.
    I haven't written it off completely yet, but I'm definitely more hesitant now than if I were facing this question 20 years ago.

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