Being an HIV positive nurse - page 3

I am about to start nursing school and I am concerned about policies towards people with HIV. My partner is HIV positive and I am therefore at a relatively high risk for infection. If I become... Read More

  1. Visit  Pacs, RN profile page
    0
    Quote from Positive Attitude
    Erm, handling body fluids is a potential risk to the health worker rather than the patient, surely?

    There are a small number of specific procedures that health workers with certain infections (including HIV) should probably not carry out. Suturing, for example. But to put a blanket ban on all nurses with HIV from being involved in direct patient care sounds like out and out descrimination if you ask me.

    I have been a nurse for 26 years and HIV positive for 25 of them and I can assure you that absolutely NO patient has ever been put at risk by me.
    Well now, what you have said is a great compromise if you ask me. Good for you. What concerned me the most was us handling sharp needles in the first place. With a nurse like you, I'm now certain our patients will be safe from the spread of this virus. Thank you Positive Attitude.
  2. Visit  czyja profile page
    1
    Provider to patient transmission appears to almost non-existent in the developed world. The one or two cases that may have happened were in a surgical setting. There is no evidence (to my knowledge) that suggests HIV+ nurses cannot safely practice.

    Patient to provider transmission is, however, a very real risk.

    Here is a link to an excellent editorial on this subject in the Annals of Internal Medicine by Julie Gerberding.

    http://www.annals.org/content/130/1/64.full

    Pacs- I welcome any contrary evidence you might have.
    achotio likes this.
  3. Visit  Pacs, RN profile page
    0
    Quote from czyja
    Provider to patient transmission appears to almost non-existent in the developed world. The one or two cases that may have happened were in a surgical setting. There is no evidence (to my knowledge) that suggests HIV+ nurses cannot safely practice.

    Patient to provider transmission is, however, a very real risk.

    Here is a link to an excellent editorial on this subject in the Annals of Internal Medicine by Julie Gerberding.

    http://www.annals.org/content/130/1/64.full

    Pacs- I welcome any contrary evidence you might have.
    Interesting article, czyja. However, I'd like to quote a line from that article: "Despite a very thorough investigation, the mechanism and date of transmission could not be established with certainty, and the patient had had dental care in a region where HIV is highly prevalent before her infection was documented." Which means that the results of the study is not without its loopholes. Nevertheless, we must not forget that the Human Immunodeficiency Virus can remain dormant for years before it can be detected by standard screening. Also, the cost of advanced procedures to detect HIV infection with certainty can be very impractical.

    Still, I have to agree that with proper precautions, one can prevent transmissions risks at about 3-1% (again, still not zero). Also worth noting that while the study may be true for developed countries, the same may not be true for underdeveloped countries where clinical settings are......less than ideal. In any case, I already agreed with Positive Attitude's compromise regarding certain specific procedures a nurse with an HIV infection should not carry out. So I don't think it's of any issue anymore.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top
close
close