20, male, I could use some advice.

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    I am 20 years old, male, going to a technical college taking just general courses this semester, I was planning on going into nursing but the more I research, the more I am skeptical. I was planning on getting my 2 year and then trying to find a job and once I've got my foot in the door I'd try and get my employer to fund my next two years for my BSN. It is not looking like any of this is possible anymore, like many people I was lead to believe there is a shortage of nurses and I figured being a male nurse I'd have a leg up on the women because theres a lot less men in the nursing world. My question to you is, should I even bother, I'd be willing to move anywhere in the country if I had to(seriously anywhere, even alaska). I know nobody is hiring new grads, much less a nurse with a 2 year degree and no experience...I've even been reading hospitals won't take nurses with anything but hospital experience so volunteering at blood drives and whatever would just be a waste of time? I apologize for the giant post, I really appreciate the advice.
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  3. 17 Comments so far...

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    I don't know where you are getting your information but it is WRONG!!! You will most likely start out working med-surg on night shift but unless you live in a community composed of nothing but nurses, you will have no problem getting a job.
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    I wouldn't say the advice you were given is wrong, but more and more hospitals, especially those in large urban areas, only want to hire new grads if they have a BSN. Why don't you call the nurse recruitment offices for the hospitals in you area and find out if they are BSN only or if they will hire AND and diploma new grads. The area I graduated nursing school from, has plenty of hospitals that hire new grads from 2 year programs, because that is most of what is in the area. Where as the current urban area I work in has the majority of its hospitals only wanting to hire BSN's
    big al lpn likes this.
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    Rule of thumb is metros, very desirable areas prefer BSNs. Everywhere not hiring new grads? False, but very true for California. A lot of my buddies end up going to Texas for their first job, there are opportunities out there you just have to give up on ideal locations til you have more experience. You might as well go for your BSN, prerequisites are pretty much the same, may take a little longer and depending on your school of Maui cost more. I paid nothing for my BSN but I took out loans for housing. Seems alot of places are less willing to help pay out your education and other bonuses.
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    I'm 23, a male, with ~ one year of RN experience. I'm almost finished with my RN to BSN. And I'm just now getting hired into an acute hospital for medical/surgical nursing. I've previously done non-acute nursing. I also live in a large metroplex in Texas. If you don't mind moving to less than ideal locations I'm sure you could get into a hospital without an issue.
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    Here's my experience.

    I had ZERO medical experience. Started Nursing school at 27, graduated with my associates at 29 in May 2012. Worked my butt off in school to get good grades, establish relationships with my instructors to get great recommendations, and applied to a BSN program before even taking NCLEX. Then when I got my license, I had my awesome reputation in school, and could put a BSN program on resume, even though I wasn't yet taking classes. I interviewed for and was hired at a community hospital on my FIRST application for a 16 week residency. At the end of the residency I was offered a full time days position on a telemetry unit. I am starting the BSN courses this September.

    My advice... Yes- it is competitive out there... But, if you WORK HARD every day in nursing school, and plan accordingly, you CAN set yourself up for success! Good luck!
    malamud69 likes this.
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    Quote from Rhody34
    Here's my experience.

    I had ZERO medical experience. Started Nursing school at 27, graduated with my associates at 29 in May 2012. Worked my butt off in school to get good grades, establish relationships with my instructors to get great recommendations, and applied to a BSN program before even taking NCLEX. Then when I got my license, I had my awesome reputation in school, and could put a BSN program on resume, even though I wasn't yet taking classes. I interviewed for and was hired at a community hospital on my FIRST application for a 16 week residency. At the end of the residency I was offered a full time days position on a telemetry unit. I am starting the BSN courses this September.

    My advice... Yes- it is competitive out there... But, if you WORK HARD every day in nursing school, and plan accordingly, you CAN set yourself up for success! Good luck!
    This is my story as well: No experience. Built good relationships. Worked hard.

    And this is anecdotal, but I think that having no experience gave me the best of both worlds: I wasn't marred by the jadedness that came with experience (e.g., I wasn't a know-it-all), and I wasn't encumbered by disappointment that came with unfulfilled expectations.
    Rhody34 likes this.
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    Quote from Caribbean Character
    I don't know where you are getting your information but it is WRONG!!! You will most likely start out working med-surg on night shift but unless you live in a community composed of nothing but nurses, you will have no problem getting a job.
    If the OP is from my area, his information is spot on correct. New grads from all walks of life (BSNs, ADNs and diplomas) are having trouble getting work up here. There are no jobs for non-BSN new grads and hospitals have cut their benefits, including tuition reimbursement.
    Esme12 and applewhitern like this.
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    There will always be need for nurses, especially with the baby boomers retiring.

    People often say they 'cannot find a job' and 'they aren't hiring new grads' but in reality, they can't get a job in the ED or ICU like they wish. You might have to grind out some time in med surg. And if there really aren't any jobs where you live, you can always try moving.

    Go for a wonderful career full of rewards, stress, good pay and headaches
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    Quote from Caribbean Character
    I don't know where you are getting your information but it is WRONG!!! You will most likely start out working med-surg on night shift but unless you live in a community composed of nothing but nurses, you will have no problem getting a job.
    In Florida it is VERY DIFFICULT for new grads to get work. I suggest networking heavily during your last two semesters. Don't wait until you graduate to start putting your name out there.


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