Latest Likes For BigPappaCRNA

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BigPappaCRNA 873 Views

Joined Jan 13, '13. Posts: 50 (62% Liked) Likes: 79

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  • 10:56 am

    The job prospects are so limiting if you go the AA route. You would be eligible to work in less than a third of the states. You would never be able to be independent in any way. Your compensation would not keep up with a dynamic, independent CRNA. Your ability to actively pursue and work 24 hour shifts would be far, far more limiting as an AA. There is just no comparison for someone in your situation. AA is great for someone with no choices or options. You have both, and it would make no sense at all to choose the limiting path of AA.

  • Jun 27

    Quote from AndersRN
    That statement will change if you go to med school and decide to become an anesthesiologist...
    No. Actually, it won't. We learn the same facts. We use the same textbooks. We do the same job. We have the same results. Unless the subject is about advanced appreciation of break room Java, and stock portfolio performance, the two educations provide the same level of knowledge and understanding.

  • Jun 27

    Quote from offlabel
    So, a flight medic of 4 or 5 years with a BS in Chemistry or Biology is less qualified than an L and D BSN nurse with the same time on her unit?

    I would love to have the flight medic as a student. They would be great. They would still need to be nurses, we we practice under our nurse license. And, they would need a BSN if the program to which they were applying were MSN or DNP programs. But those are not my rules, or even program rules. That is University rules. But one does have to be an RN, to be a CRNA.

  • Jun 27

    Quote from AndersRN
    That statement will change if you go to med school and decide to become an anesthesiologist...
    No. Actually, it won't. We learn the same facts. We use the same textbooks. We do the same job. We have the same results. Unless the subject is about advanced appreciation of break room Java, and stock portfolio performance, the two educations provide the same level of knowledge and understanding.

  • Jun 25

    Quote from offlabel
    Whoa...I have no reason to doubt this statement, but if its true, there has to be way more to the story....Just at face value, this is an endorsement of AA equivalency to CRNAs by USGPAN...not doing any favors to CRNA's if this isn't just an outlier in their admissions. That's an off the street admission into anesthesia training, unless, like I said, there's more to the story.

    That said, as an in the trenches provider, it isn't hard to tell those CRNA's with strong CC backgrounds. If a candidate doesn't bring that to the table and the program accepts them, that's on the school. But they're not the ones that have to work with them.

    So what I'd say to the OP is, be as strong as possible for the sake of your future patients and the CRNA's you'll ultimately be working with.

    No AA equivalent. Just that fact that experience is experience is experience. It is about decisions and critical thinking and priority setting and communicating and achievement. You can and do get that in most any unit. As a CRNA educator for over two decades, I love ER nurses. They are very good at situational thinking. All those things I mentioned up above. There is nothing magical about ICU experience, and, in fact, 95% of what we do is quite boring, mundane, and routine. But ICU experience does give a little bit of an edge up on worst case scenario kind of patient presentations that we see once in a while. A full nursing education and 4-5 years of any type of acute care RN experience and you are light years ahead of any AA.

  • Jun 25

    Quote from offlabel
    ER and PACU experience alone are non starters for most programs. CC experience is a non negotiable for any worthwhile program, generally speaking.
    You are partially correct. Most programs want to see at least some critical care experience, but not all. Your comment about any "worthwhile" program requiring it is not accurate. Just the opposite is actually true. The crappy programs all puff up and posture and try to tell you how competitive they are (really program x, with a class size of near 200?). While the better programs are actually far more open minded and flexible. Hell, the assistant director of the Army Program had exclusively OB experience, and I think that is a "worthwhile" program.

    Bottom line, don't guess, and don't take anyone's word here, including mine, just research the programs. Call them. They are very happy to help.

  • Jun 25

    Quote from offlabel
    Whoa...I have no reason to doubt this statement, but if its true, there has to be way more to the story....Just at face value, this is an endorsement of AA equivalency to CRNAs by USGPAN...not doing any favors to CRNA's if this isn't just an outlier in their admissions. That's an off the street admission into anesthesia training, unless, like I said, there's more to the story.

    That said, as an in the trenches provider, it isn't hard to tell those CRNA's with strong CC backgrounds. If a candidate doesn't bring that to the table and the program accepts them, that's on the school. But they're not the ones that have to work with them.

    So what I'd say to the OP is, be as strong as possible for the sake of your future patients and the CRNA's you'll ultimately be working with.

    No AA equivalent. Just that fact that experience is experience is experience. It is about decisions and critical thinking and priority setting and communicating and achievement. You can and do get that in most any unit. As a CRNA educator for over two decades, I love ER nurses. They are very good at situational thinking. All those things I mentioned up above. There is nothing magical about ICU experience, and, in fact, 95% of what we do is quite boring, mundane, and routine. But ICU experience does give a little bit of an edge up on worst case scenario kind of patient presentations that we see once in a while. A full nursing education and 4-5 years of any type of acute care RN experience and you are light years ahead of any AA.

  • Jun 25

    Quote from offlabel
    ER and PACU experience alone are non starters for most programs. CC experience is a non negotiable for any worthwhile program, generally speaking.
    You are partially correct. Most programs want to see at least some critical care experience, but not all. Your comment about any "worthwhile" program requiring it is not accurate. Just the opposite is actually true. The crappy programs all puff up and posture and try to tell you how competitive they are (really program x, with a class size of near 200?). While the better programs are actually far more open minded and flexible. Hell, the assistant director of the Army Program had exclusively OB experience, and I think that is a "worthwhile" program.

    Bottom line, don't guess, and don't take anyone's word here, including mine, just research the programs. Call them. They are very happy to help.

  • Jun 23

    Quote from Nurse Cookie Swirl
    I've been accepted into a CRNA program that offers an MNA degree. I still have 2 interviews lined up for other schools. One is a DNP and the other school is a MSNA. I might want to teach in the future and I see most CRNA teaching jobs require an MSN. Do you think they'd hire me with a MNA degree?

    Any input would be appreciated!

    Thanks,
    -Swirl

    That all depends. If the school in which you want to teach is in a school of nursing, your MSNA may keep you from getting the job. They might not be able to hire you, even if they want to, with an MNA or MSNA.

  • Jun 19

    CRNAs can and do work in all 50 states. Completely independently of any MDA. I have simply NEVER heard of any ACT practice as you describe. If true, it is indeed the outlier. I haven't seen an MDA in over 10 years.

  • Jun 16

    They should not have huge class size. They should not be scrambling to find clinical sites for all their students at the last minute. Their attrition rate should be low. They should offer CRNA only sites through which to rotate. They should have hands opportunity for blocks and spinals and epidurals. There should be no need to ever worry about your numbers, any of your numbers. If the program constantly tells you how tough, hard, and rigorous they are, I would run away. If the program tells you to study for your interview, I would look elsewhere. If the current students aren't allowed to speak with prospective students freely and openly, I would look elsewhere. If the program is owned and ran by a Med group, I would look elsewhere. If they are not regionally accredited, I would look elsewhere. Of course there can be exceptions, but these should be at least some of the indicators of which prospective students to research. Carefully!!! Good luck.

  • Jun 6

    Quote from cocoa_puff
    I know Gonzaga University in Spokane WA offers CRNA only clinical in smaller, rural facilities, in addition to clinicals at a level II trauma center and a community hospital. Franciscan Skemp also offers CRNA only clinicals.

    As for the minimum one year ICU experience, it is the minimum for a reason. In that first year, you're not only learning how to be an ICU nurse, but you're also learning how to be a safe and competent nurse. It takes awhile to become proficient. Also, even with certification and leadership, you would be competing with more experienced ICU nurses for spots. When I apply for CRNA school, I plan to have at least 3-4 years of ICU experience. I want to get to the point where I can expertly handle anything on the unit, and I want to be seen as someone the other ICU nurses can come to for help. I want to do RRT, charge nurse, precepting, serving on committees, possibly even do a publicized research study. While you could probably get in somewhere with one year, a few extra years will make you a stronger candidate for CRNA school.

    Thank you thank you thank you. Finally someone gets it. Someone that is listening. It takes more than one year to be an adequate ICU nurse let alone to then move on to the challenges that lay head in a CRNA program. The smaller the program the more competitive, the more competitive the better you need to be, the better you need to be you need some ICU experience.

    The two schools you mentioned are excellent examples of small class size and outstanding clinical opportunities. Others are, of course, any of the military programs, Midwestern, Kaiser, National University, Arkansas State, Samuel Merritt. There are others, this list is hardly all of them. Just the ones that pop into my head right now.

  • Jun 4

    Quote from kLPantera
    What about the school rankings given by Search for Top CRNA Schools in Your Area which they claim to be ranked by actual data and not subjectiveness?
    Well, I just reviewed several programs on that website. It is highly inaccurate and woefully outdated. Of the first three programs at which I looked, they still have a program director listed who has been gone for over 5 years. They have a program listed in California which does not exist in California, and never did!! They have some listed which no longer exist. They don't even have any program listed in Arizona, even though there are two. Several reviews still list score requirements for the GRE with the old criteria.

    Maybe, maybe that site was relevant and valid at some point, but right now it is horribly outdated. Buyer beware.

  • Jun 4

    The rankings are highly, highly subjective. But they do look at certain benchmarks, and these are not really important. Let's look at 1st time board pass rate. Sure it is nice, but it tells you nothing about the program. It could quite literally be the worst program in the country, but have a high rate, because they have taught their students how to pass a test, rather than how to administer an anesthetic. I have seen some programs get cited by the COA for low rate, and the programs plan is to make the students attend 2,3, or 4 board review programs, all on the students dime. Then they actually have someone teaching their students, and their rate goes up, and now they look like they are "highly successful" even though it is a joke.

    This is is just one example of the rankings meaning nothing. But I will say, that those in the bottom third really are there for a reason. No matter the metric, there is no reasonable case that they should be in the top third. So, what does that mean? Well, is the 5th highest rated school better than the 12th? Probably not. But is the 20th highest rated program better than the 93rd? Most likely, yes.

  • Jun 4

    The rankings are highly, highly subjective. But they do look at certain benchmarks, and these are not really important. Let's look at 1st time board pass rate. Sure it is nice, but it tells you nothing about the program. It could quite literally be the worst program in the country, but have a high rate, because they have taught their students how to pass a test, rather than how to administer an anesthetic. I have seen some programs get cited by the COA for low rate, and the programs plan is to make the students attend 2,3, or 4 board review programs, all on the students dime. Then they actually have someone teaching their students, and their rate goes up, and now they look like they are "highly successful" even though it is a joke.

    This is is just one example of the rankings meaning nothing. But I will say, that those in the bottom third really are there for a reason. No matter the metric, there is no reasonable case that they should be in the top third. So, what does that mean? Well, is the 5th highest rated school better than the 12th? Probably not. But is the 20th highest rated program better than the 93rd? Most likely, yes.


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