Latest Likes For BigPappaCRNA

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BigPappaCRNA 739 Views

Joined Jan 13, '13. Posts: 35 (60% Liked) Likes: 60

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  • May 29

    So your post actually makes my point. Even Albany actually DOES accept Neuro-ICU. And, of course they do. My God, do you really think they would accept Neonatal ICU but not adult Neuro?!?!? Really?!?!? Listen carefully now, you are a great web surfer, there is no doubt. But you are not a good listener. Usually that is because one doesn't like what they are hearing because it goes against their preconceived ideas. I sit on admissions, info to "Assembly of School Faculty" every year. I consult with colleagues around the country every month. We frequently speak because we have potential students apply to 5, 10, sometimes 15 different schools. Students even ask questions about other programs and we help set them up for success. I do this. For a living. Believe what you want, as it makes no matter to me. But to the OP, please do your due diligence you will do just fine. If there is a program you really want to attend, just call them. Ask them. They will be only to happy to help you. There are a few that won't, and you can draw your own conclusions as to what kind of program it is. While performing your due diligence, make sure you go to a program that,

    1. Has small-ish classes. Avoid huge classes.
    2. Has at least some independent CRNA only rotations.
    3. Allows you to do regional anesthesia of all kinds and that you get far in excess your case numbers.
    4. Allows you to get far in excess of all your OB numbers. This is very important. 80-100 epidurals and spinals, and 40-50 C-Sections need to be the norm.

    To the OP, good luck.

  • May 28

    CRNAs can and do work in all 50 states. Completely independently of any MDA. I have simply NEVER heard of any ACT practice as you describe. If true, it is indeed the outlier. I haven't seen an MDA in over 10 years.

  • May 26

    So your post actually makes my point. Even Albany actually DOES accept Neuro-ICU. And, of course they do. My God, do you really think they would accept Neonatal ICU but not adult Neuro?!?!? Really?!?!? Listen carefully now, you are a great web surfer, there is no doubt. But you are not a good listener. Usually that is because one doesn't like what they are hearing because it goes against their preconceived ideas. I sit on admissions, info to "Assembly of School Faculty" every year. I consult with colleagues around the country every month. We frequently speak because we have potential students apply to 5, 10, sometimes 15 different schools. Students even ask questions about other programs and we help set them up for success. I do this. For a living. Believe what you want, as it makes no matter to me. But to the OP, please do your due diligence you will do just fine. If there is a program you really want to attend, just call them. Ask them. They will be only to happy to help you. There are a few that won't, and you can draw your own conclusions as to what kind of program it is. While performing your due diligence, make sure you go to a program that,

    1. Has small-ish classes. Avoid huge classes.
    2. Has at least some independent CRNA only rotations.
    3. Allows you to do regional anesthesia of all kinds and that you get far in excess your case numbers.
    4. Allows you to get far in excess of all your OB numbers. This is very important. 80-100 epidurals and spinals, and 40-50 C-Sections need to be the norm.

    To the OP, good luck.

  • May 26

    So your post actually makes my point. Even Albany actually DOES accept Neuro-ICU. And, of course they do. My God, do you really think they would accept Neonatal ICU but not adult Neuro?!?!? Really?!?!? Listen carefully now, you are a great web surfer, there is no doubt. But you are not a good listener. Usually that is because one doesn't like what they are hearing because it goes against their preconceived ideas. I sit on admissions, info to "Assembly of School Faculty" every year. I consult with colleagues around the country every month. We frequently speak because we have potential students apply to 5, 10, sometimes 15 different schools. Students even ask questions about other programs and we help set them up for success. I do this. For a living. Believe what you want, as it makes no matter to me. But to the OP, please do your due diligence you will do just fine. If there is a program you really want to attend, just call them. Ask them. They will be only to happy to help you. There are a few that won't, and you can draw your own conclusions as to what kind of program it is. While performing your due diligence, make sure you go to a program that,

    1. Has small-ish classes. Avoid huge classes.
    2. Has at least some independent CRNA only rotations.
    3. Allows you to do regional anesthesia of all kinds and that you get far in excess your case numbers.
    4. Allows you to get far in excess of all your OB numbers. This is very important. 80-100 epidurals and spinals, and 40-50 C-Sections need to be the norm.

    To the OP, good luck.

  • May 25

    So your post actually makes my point. Even Albany actually DOES accept Neuro-ICU. And, of course they do. My God, do you really think they would accept Neonatal ICU but not adult Neuro?!?!? Really?!?!? Listen carefully now, you are a great web surfer, there is no doubt. But you are not a good listener. Usually that is because one doesn't like what they are hearing because it goes against their preconceived ideas. I sit on admissions, info to "Assembly of School Faculty" every year. I consult with colleagues around the country every month. We frequently speak because we have potential students apply to 5, 10, sometimes 15 different schools. Students even ask questions about other programs and we help set them up for success. I do this. For a living. Believe what you want, as it makes no matter to me. But to the OP, please do your due diligence you will do just fine. If there is a program you really want to attend, just call them. Ask them. They will be only to happy to help you. There are a few that won't, and you can draw your own conclusions as to what kind of program it is. While performing your due diligence, make sure you go to a program that,

    1. Has small-ish classes. Avoid huge classes.
    2. Has at least some independent CRNA only rotations.
    3. Allows you to do regional anesthesia of all kinds and that you get far in excess your case numbers.
    4. Allows you to get far in excess of all your OB numbers. This is very important. 80-100 epidurals and spinals, and 40-50 C-Sections need to be the norm.

    To the OP, good luck.

  • May 25

    So your post actually makes my point. Even Albany actually DOES accept Neuro-ICU. And, of course they do. My God, do you really think they would accept Neonatal ICU but not adult Neuro?!?!? Really?!?!? Listen carefully now, you are a great web surfer, there is no doubt. But you are not a good listener. Usually that is because one doesn't like what they are hearing because it goes against their preconceived ideas. I sit on admissions, info to "Assembly of School Faculty" every year. I consult with colleagues around the country every month. We frequently speak because we have potential students apply to 5, 10, sometimes 15 different schools. Students even ask questions about other programs and we help set them up for success. I do this. For a living. Believe what you want, as it makes no matter to me. But to the OP, please do your due diligence you will do just fine. If there is a program you really want to attend, just call them. Ask them. They will be only to happy to help you. There are a few that won't, and you can draw your own conclusions as to what kind of program it is. While performing your due diligence, make sure you go to a program that,

    1. Has small-ish classes. Avoid huge classes.
    2. Has at least some independent CRNA only rotations.
    3. Allows you to do regional anesthesia of all kinds and that you get far in excess your case numbers.
    4. Allows you to get far in excess of all your OB numbers. This is very important. 80-100 epidurals and spinals, and 40-50 C-Sections need to be the norm.

    To the OP, good luck.

  • May 25

    Quote from GoVeg
    How can you say this when there are schools that don't accept neuro or say it is last on their list? I work neuro now and am switching because of this. It is very school dependent and yes, to some schools the unit does matter.

    Because I am actually one of the people sitting on those committees. For two different programs. Thousands of miles apart. Neuro is not frowned on any more than CVICU is preferred. This is a crazy myth the permeates this board, and it is pure dogma. I attend conferences with faculty from all over the country, and I know what they like and things about which they care not at all. Almost every post presented here as evidence actually makes the opposite point. Those lists are not in any particular order. Level I does not matter either. Far better to be in a large, busy, community ICU not crawling with residents and where critical
    thinking and assessment are necessary. So many, many myths on this site.

  • May 25

    Quote from sweetether
    I would strongly advice you against taking the Neuro ICU job. Schools do rank candidates according to their area of specialty. Generally, Surgical ICU and Cardiothoracic ICU are the most preferred, then Medical ICU, and Neuro and PICU/NICU are last on the list. Also, the trauma experience will gain favor for you as well. I would stay at the current level 1 trauma facility and work in the Medical ICU there.
    You are painfully misinformed and giving bad advice. Neuro ICU is fine. Just fine. The OP will be fine either route they choose.

  • May 25

    Quote from GoVeg
    How can you say this when there are schools that don't accept neuro or say it is last on their list? I work neuro now and am switching because of this. It is very school dependent and yes, to some schools the unit does matter.

    Because I am actually one of the people sitting on those committees. For two different programs. Thousands of miles apart. Neuro is not frowned on any more than CVICU is preferred. This is a crazy myth the permeates this board, and it is pure dogma. I attend conferences with faculty from all over the country, and I know what they like and things about which they care not at all. Almost every post presented here as evidence actually makes the opposite point. Those lists are not in any particular order. Level I does not matter either. Far better to be in a large, busy, community ICU not crawling with residents and where critical
    thinking and assessment are necessary. So many, many myths on this site.

  • May 25

    Quote from sweetether
    Ok BigPapaCRNA. Your profile says you are a prenursing student.... Your vocabulary sounds a lot like Richwade.... hmmm. Perhaps, it is you who is "painfully misinformed".
    Well I am a CRNA with 30 years experience. Over 20 as a faculty. I actually DO this for a living. You talk about it.

  • May 25

    Quote from sweetether
    Continue to live in ignorance. No point arguing with you anymore Richwade. Sounds to me like you are making a generalization based off of your anecdotal evidence.

    So many fallacies... anecdotal fallacy, hasty generalization, shifting the burden of proof, cherry picking...
    Except that I am actually a CRNA. I actually am a faculty member. I actually sit on multiple admission committees. I actually interact with my faculty colleagues. I actually GIVE anesthesia. I DON'T pass along third person information. I DO. You TALK. Good day.

  • May 21

    CRNAs can and do work in all 50 states. Completely independently of any MDA. I have simply NEVER heard of any ACT practice as you describe. If true, it is indeed the outlier. I haven't seen an MDA in over 10 years.

  • May 18

    Yes, actually, he is. He is an AA. He is not a CRNA. He has NEVER done this kind of anesthesia in an office setting, because legally, he can't. Don't worry about him.

  • May 17

    Yes, actually, he is. He is an AA. He is not a CRNA. He has NEVER done this kind of anesthesia in an office setting, because legally, he can't. Don't worry about him.

  • May 9

    I know nothing about this program, but if those things about which you write are true, go for it. Small class size is a huge plus. CRNA only rotations are a huge plus. 1800 hours is great, outstanding really. Don't get too hung up on the DNP thing. They are all kind of the same. The DNP comes from a school of nursing , while a DNAP comes from all others. Just not a big deal. As far as cost, to get all that at a cheap price is great.


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