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BigPappaCRNA 2,501 Views

Joined Jan 13, '13. Posts: 94 (68% Liked) Likes: 180

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  • Dec 13

    Yes. It is very much within the CRNA scope of practice. Done every day, all over the country, by CRNAs, everywhere. Having said that, there are less, and less Swan lines being placed. There are so many new and different technologies out there now that give very similar data, and do so with non-invasive technology. As to the OP, that is a very old term, but I am guessing it has something to do with putting up the wedge balloon during the last portion of placement, and letting the balloon "float" into position.

  • Dec 4

    You may get into a program, as there are a lot of them, and some of them are puppy mills. But the more important question is, "will I be able to graduate?" Only you will know for sure, but, anesthesia school is exponentially more difficult than your BSN. If you are able to objectively self assess why you did poorly in past classes, and why you will be better in much more difficult classes, than you will have your answer. But, for myself, before I quit my job, moved, spent 20-50K for the first year, etc, I would want to be damn sure I had a chance a success.

  • Dec 4

    Do nothing directly for school. Relax, chill, take a vacation, visit some friends or family, get your life in order. Get things squared away. Try to take care of all the little things in your life that will get in the way once school starts.

    And read "Watchful Care"

  • Dec 1

    You may get into a program, as there are a lot of them, and some of them are puppy mills. But the more important question is, "will I be able to graduate?" Only you will know for sure, but, anesthesia school is exponentially more difficult than your BSN. If you are able to objectively self assess why you did poorly in past classes, and why you will be better in much more difficult classes, than you will have your answer. But, for myself, before I quit my job, moved, spent 20-50K for the first year, etc, I would want to be damn sure I had a chance a success.

  • Dec 1

    You may get into a program, as there are a lot of them, and some of them are puppy mills. But the more important question is, "will I be able to graduate?" Only you will know for sure, but, anesthesia school is exponentially more difficult than your BSN. If you are able to objectively self assess why you did poorly in past classes, and why you will be better in much more difficult classes, than you will have your answer. But, for myself, before I quit my job, moved, spent 20-50K for the first year, etc, I would want to be damn sure I had a chance a success.

  • Nov 27

    Do nothing directly for school. Relax, chill, take a vacation, visit some friends or family, get your life in order. Get things squared away. Try to take care of all the little things in your life that will get in the way once school starts.

    And read "Watchful Care"

  • Nov 26

    Do nothing directly for school. Relax, chill, take a vacation, visit some friends or family, get your life in order. Get things squared away. Try to take care of all the little things in your life that will get in the way once school starts.

    And read "Watchful Care"

  • Nov 19

    Well, school does not get easier when you start CRNA school, and it is science intensive. Ask yourself, honestly, why you did not do well in some classes, and decide if that can be improved. Maybe you got sick, had a child, had to move, had money problems,etc, if not, maybe you should look elsewhere. I don't undertand quitting your current job, paying tens of thousands of dollars, maybe moving, all just to drop out after one semester. You have to be honest and objective with yourself. Certainly, take a graduate level statistics course, or chemistry course, or physiology course, and let that be your guide.

    I also would urge you NOT to apply to the big, giant, puppy mill programs. Of course they may accept you. They have a few hundred initial spots, so what do they have to lose? Apply to a smaller, leaner school, where, if you get accepted, you can be certain they feel that you will have what it takes to make it. Again, starting school is a major, life changing event. Just because you want it really badly does not mean you will succeed. Do away with some of the guess work.

    Good luck.

  • Nov 18

    Well, school does not get easier when you start CRNA school, and it is science intensive. Ask yourself, honestly, why you did not do well in some classes, and decide if that can be improved. Maybe you got sick, had a child, had to move, had money problems,etc, if not, maybe you should look elsewhere. I don't undertand quitting your current job, paying tens of thousands of dollars, maybe moving, all just to drop out after one semester. You have to be honest and objective with yourself. Certainly, take a graduate level statistics course, or chemistry course, or physiology course, and let that be your guide.

    I also would urge you NOT to apply to the big, giant, puppy mill programs. Of course they may accept you. They have a few hundred initial spots, so what do they have to lose? Apply to a smaller, leaner school, where, if you get accepted, you can be certain they feel that you will have what it takes to make it. Again, starting school is a major, life changing event. Just because you want it really badly does not mean you will succeed. Do away with some of the guess work.

    Good luck.

  • Oct 30

    The practice is dogma from days long ago. It is no longer required as it once was. Some people still probably insist on you doing it in school, and that is fine, but it just does not matter. Not even a little bit. Pretreat or not, same K+ shifts, same increase in IOP, same increase in abdominal pressure, same myalgias. It really just makes the patient look better at induction, but there is a literal ton of literature out there that says they will still have just as much myalgias. Like cricoid pressure, it is going to take several generations for this dogma to die.

  • Oct 29

    The practice is dogma from days long ago. It is no longer required as it once was. Some people still probably insist on you doing it in school, and that is fine, but it just does not matter. Not even a little bit. Pretreat or not, same K+ shifts, same increase in IOP, same increase in abdominal pressure, same myalgias. It really just makes the patient look better at induction, but there is a literal ton of literature out there that says they will still have just as much myalgias. Like cricoid pressure, it is going to take several generations for this dogma to die.

  • Oct 29

    The practice is dogma from days long ago. It is no longer required as it once was. Some people still probably insist on you doing it in school, and that is fine, but it just does not matter. Not even a little bit. Pretreat or not, same K+ shifts, same increase in IOP, same increase in abdominal pressure, same myalgias. It really just makes the patient look better at induction, but there is a literal ton of literature out there that says they will still have just as much myalgias. Like cricoid pressure, it is going to take several generations for this dogma to die.

  • Oct 24

    Don't try to study before school starts. It is a waste of time. You are going to school to learn that stuff. The two books I would recommend that you read before starting school are, "Watchful Care" and "What I was not (nessessarily) Taught about Anesthesia." If you had to choose just one, then let it be "Watchful Care."

  • Oct 24

    Don't try to study before school starts. It is a waste of time. You are going to school to learn that stuff. The two books I would recommend that you read before starting school are, "Watchful Care" and "What I was not (nessessarily) Taught about Anesthesia." If you had to choose just one, then let it be "Watchful Care."

  • Oct 24

    Don't try to study before school starts. It is a waste of time. You are going to school to learn that stuff. The two books I would recommend that you read before starting school are, "Watchful Care" and "What I was not (nessessarily) Taught about Anesthesia." If you had to choose just one, then let it be "Watchful Care."


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