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OCRN3, MSN, NP 7,970 Views

Joined: Dec 25, '12; Posts: 395 (48% Liked) ; Likes: 512

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  • Mar 26

    Not a corrections nurse but have friends and an ex-wife that work at Donovan in SD. My understanding is that the "Limited Term" slots are designated that simply for accounting purposes. Meaning that they generally rollover in to a full time "permanent" slot. But I'm sure that it also depends on how good a nurse you prove to them you are. Meaning that if you are a crappy nurse then you will probably not be extended a permanent offer. I've been to Midland and I've been to Blythe. Both are podunk towns with little going for them. So, which do you want? A higher paying job in corrections or high stress job in a Texas ED? Choose wisely...

  • Mar 26

    It's been said a thousand times but I'll say it once more - you should become an NP because you want to do the JOB. Not for schedule, or pay, or respect, etc. Examples like the one above are great for prospective NPs to see. Think long and hard about why you want to become a NP. Because at the end of the day only the job itself will make it worthwhile.

    I'd become an NP all over again even if I got paid the same wage as a RN with the same hours as a RN. I want to be a provider. I don't hate being a RN but it is not the role I want to fill.

  • Dec 31 '16

    way too long of a commute IMO. do a pro/con list, if you dont mind the long drive, go for it.

  • Dec 31 '16

    94 miles is quite far in good conditions/no traffic. Do-able for some, especially if you cluster your days. However, it is far and I might consider it too far if traffic and weather are also going to cause significant delays. Is there any possibility of moving closer to work? Maybe not right away, but if you love the job and think you'll be there long term? Maybe you could stick out the commute for 6 months or so and then start thinking about moving closer? That being said, I realize this may not be easy considering your child, school systems, your spouse, etc.

    The reason I focus on the commute is because to me it seems to be the only barrier. Everything else sounds perfect - better pay, in a specialty you like, good benefits. If it were me I'd try to make it work, but I am also unmarried with no kids. Best of luck and keep us posted!

  • Dec 31 '16

    90 miles one way. In the ED you usually rotate shifts and coming off a 12 hour shift driving home can be rough - plus if you live in the snow belt may be dangerous. As an RN I had a job that was 34 miles one way and I worked nights and it was awful driving home sleepy and I hated the drive even though I loved the job. When I was looking at NP positions I had an offer from a facility 1 hour away and I did the math. Account for the hours in commute, the depreciation/wear and tear on the car and the cost of fuel and that added up over time - plus in the ED you are going to lose weekends. Too bad you cannot try it out part time and keep your current job just to see if it works.

  • Dec 31 '16

    If you really want the job, consider clustering your days and sleeping where you work for a day/night or two. I know people who have done this and it paid off big time. Also, after you get experience, there are places desparate for ER help and paying well.

  • Dec 19 '16

    Quote from The_Physicist
    One would think that more advance education means higher pay. But I guess, the old supply and demand take precedence.
    You are correct and supply is increasing at a breakneck speed. Also consider what in my experience indicates a lack of business savvy and negotiation skills on the part of many who are coming out of school and accepting subpar wages.

  • Dec 19 '16

    Good thinking. I did get the job at SFGH. I will be starting soon!

  • Dec 18 '16

    If the commute works for you, go for it? My organized self would make a list of pros and cons to see the benefits and disadvantages in print.

  • Dec 18 '16

    Double the money? Heck yeah. Sounds like you found a killer offer in a dream specialty.

  • Dec 18 '16

    I have two jobs and work in Cali. I work a regular 8 to 5 job and then on the weekends if I want I pick up a shift or two at the urgent care. If I'm in the mood to work a ton I pick up a night shift at the urgent care during the week. It just depends on how much money I want to make that week.

  • Dec 18 '16

    If only Kaiser used NPs in the ED.

  • Dec 18 '16

    I have been an emergency NP for the past two years, the money is OK, but I want more.
    That said, I also want time for my family and travel.

    Has anyone found a way to balance life and work?

    I think for myself and my wife in the SF Bay area bringing in an extra 50 - 75K would make all the difference in the world.

    It sucks that an RN can work 3 shifts a week and it's called full time and they are getting more money than i am

    Maybe i'll start selling Medicinal MJ scrips.

    So this is more of a rant than a thread, but if you have any ideas on how to branch out and make more money, let me know! otherwise going back to med school is sounding better and better, I want to do more and get paid for it, but it's a long road through medschool and debt sucks.

  • Dec 18 '16

    So I see that at the age of 2 months, there are 6 vaccinations that are due. Do we have to prescribe all 6 on the same day? I feel that it's too much vaccination for just one visit. Do they need to be separated by a few days?


    Here is the immunization schedule: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedul...d-schedule.pdf

  • Dec 18 '16

    Don't know your location.. but an NP should be worth much more than 95K.


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